Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee

Monday 7 March 2022 at 1.00pm

 

 

AGENDA

 

 


Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee

7 March 2022

Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee Agenda

 

Meeting to be held in the Remotely via Zoom link

on Monday 7 March 2022, commencing at 1.00pm

 

Recommendations contained in the agenda are NOT decisions of the meeting. Please refer to minutes for resolutions.

 

MEMBERSHIP OF THE Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee

Chairperson, NRC Councillor, Councillor Amy Macdonald

Deputy Chairperson, WDC Representative Delaraine Armstrong

FNDC Councillor David Clendon

KDC Representative Fiona Kemp

WDC Councillor Anna Murphy

KDC Mayor Jason Smith

FNDC Representative Antony Thompson

NRC Representative Rihari Dargaville

 

 

 

 

RĪMITI (Item)                                                                                                       Page

1.0      Ngā Mahi Whakapai/Housekeeping

2.0      Ngā Whakapahā/apologies   

3.0      Ngā Whakapuakanga/declarations of conflicts of interest

4.0      Ngā Whakaae Miniti (Confirmation of Minutes)

4.1      Confirmation of Minutes - 29 November 2021                  3

5.0      Receipt of Action Sheet

5.1      Receipt of Action Sheet                                                          9

6.0      Reports

6.1      Adopting Terms of Reference                                             11

6.2      Joint Strategy update                                                           16

6.3      Peer review of the Joint Strategy                                       82

6.4      Update on branding and identity process, including snapshot                                                                                 94

 


Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee                                                    item: 4.1

7 March 2022

 

TITLE:

Confirmation of Minutes - 29 November 2021

From:

Erica Wade, Personal Assistant - Environmental Services

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience, on 03 February 2022

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the minutes of the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee meeting held on 29 November 2021, be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee Minutes - Unconfirmed   


Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee  ITEM: 4.1

7 March 2022Attachment 1

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Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee                                                    item: 5.1

7 March 2022

 

TITLE:

Receipt of Action Sheet

From:

Erica Wade, Personal Assistant - Environmental Services

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience, on 03 February 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

The purpose of this report is to enable the meeting to receive the current action sheet.

 

Nga mahi tutohutia / Recommendation

That the action sheet be received.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Schedule of Actions   


Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee  ITEM: 5.1

7 March 2022Attachment 1

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Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee                                                    item: 6.1

7 March 2022

 

TITLE:

Adopting Terms of Reference

From:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience, on 21 February 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

Terms of Reference (ToR) is a requirement under the Local Government Act 2002 for establishing a Joint Committee. The ToR sets out the Joint Committee roles and responsibilities, its membership, service of meetings, meeting frequency, quorum, appointment of Chair and Deputy and remuneration. This report presents a previously revised ToR based on amendments put forward by Far North District Council and now includes the completion of recent work by councils to align their Non-Elected Member Allowances Policies. Staff are seeking endorsement of the ToR and a recommendation for adoption by each member council.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.        That the report ‘Adopting Terms of Reference’ by Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience and dated 17 February 2022, be received.

2.        That the attached Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee Terms of Reference are endorsed.

3.        That the Joint Committee recommend the revised Terms of Reference be adopted by each member council.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

The Joint Committee endorses the ToR as attached and recommends the revised ToR to be adopted by each member council.

The Joint Committee meets the requirements under the Local Government Act 2002.

Each council remunerates their hapū/iwi appointees in accordance with either their respective remuneration policy or with NRC’s non-elected members allowances policy.

Improved consistency in remuneration has been reached in a way that meets councils’ needs.

Iwi/hapū representatives’ remuneration between councils is inconsistent, noting that the discrepancy in remuneration between councils is minor.

2

The Joint Committee does not endorse the ToR.

The Joint Committee may delay endorsement and put forward another recommendation calling for full consistency between council policies. 

The Joint Committee arrangements are consistent with Local Government Act 2002 requirements.

 

The staff’s recommended option is option one.

 

Considerations

1.        Environmental Impact

Adopting a clear ToR will enable the Joint Committee to guide and support the region to proactively respond to the impacts of climate change now and in the future.

2.        Community views

Adaptation to climate change is of significant interest to the community however community concerns are more likely to be related to the adaptation programmes and actions of member councils than the terms of reference specifically.

3.        Māori impact statement

While the decision on the ToR will have an impact on the remuneration of tangata whenua representatives on the Joint Committee, there are no known impacts on Māori generally, over and above that of the general public, from this decision. 

4.        Financial implications

The Joint Committee recommendation for member councils to adopt the ToR will require remuneration for tangata whenua members nominated by each council. There are therefore some financial implications however this is considered minor, and each council has confirmed this will be accommodated within current operational budgets.

5.        Implementation issues

There are no known implementation issues associated with the decision.

6.        Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because it is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that this decision can be made without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

 

7.        Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

 The recommendation by the Joint Committee for each council to adopt the revised ToR is consistent with the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002 relating to joint committees and is considered to be low risk.

Background/Tuhinga

The ToR presented in this report has had minor amendments to the terminology used and a change to the remuneration clause.  These changes are based on amendments put forward by Far North District Council in December 2020 and reflect work councils have undertaken to review and align their Non-Elected Members Allowances Policies.

A report seeking endorsement and recommendation to each member council for adoption of the terms of reference came to the Joint Committee on April 2021. The Joint Committee requested that councils review their non-elected member allowances policies and come up with a consistent policy. Since this request, Northland Regional Council has reviewed their policy and increased the total remuneration amount per meeting. The Far North and Kaipara district councils also aligned their non-elected members allowance polices with that of the NRC to payments of $240.00. The Whangarei district council rate is currently $280.00; therefore, WDC are waiting to review their policy in its entirety after the 2022 elections.

Wording in the draft ToR on remuneration presented to the Joint Committee meeting in April 2021 stated; “Respective iwi / hapū representatives will be remunerated and reimbursed by the nominating council in accordance with either the non-elected members remuneration policy of that council or alternatively the Northland Regional Council Appointed Members’ Allowances Policy”.

Since the review of the NRC non-elected members allowances policy, the draft ToR has been updated to reflect the work done by councils to align this and now states “Respective iwi / hapū representatives will be remunerated and reimbursed by the nominating council in accordance with either the non-elected members remuneration policy of that council or alternatively the Northland Regional Council non-elected members allowances policy.”

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

·    That the report ‘Adopting Terms of Reference’ Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience and dated 17 February 2022 be received.

·    That the Joint Committee endorse the attached revised ToR and recommend they be adopted by each member council (the Joint Committee cannot confirm its own ToR). It should be noted that the ToR do allow for subsequent amendment subject to the approval of all member councils, so they can be adjusted in future if necessary.

 

 

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Revised Terms of Reference   


Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee  ITEM: 6.1

7 March 2022Attachment 1

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Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee                                                    item: 6.2

7 March 2022

 

TITLE:

Joint Strategy update

From:

Jan van der Vliet, Natural Hazards Advisor and Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience, on 23 February 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report advises that all partner councils aim to adopt the Draft Te Tai Tokerau Climate Change Adaption Strategy at the respective council meetings by the end of April 2022.

 

The Strategy document, following the endorsement by the Committee, has incorporated the minor changes / amendments as discussed and identified / noted in the minutes, recommendation two of the last Committee meeting on 29 November 2021.  The Chair and Deputy Chair have authorised the amendments.

 

The Strategy document includes the Foreword by the Joint Committee Chair and Deputy Chair.  This was not included at the time of the above referred meeting for which we are seeking endorsement.

 

The full Te Tai Tokerau Climate Change Adaptation Strategy document is attached to this report.

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

·   That the report ‘Joint Strategy update’ by Jan van der Vliet, Natural Hazards Advisor and Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist and dated 9 February 2022, be received.

·   That the included Foreword to the Te Tai Tokerau Climate Change Adaptation Strategy be endorsed by the Committee.

 

Background/Tuhinga

Not relevant

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Te Tai Tokerau Climate Adaptations Strategy   


Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee  ITEM: 6.2

7 March 2022Attachment 1

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Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee                                                    item: 6.3

7 March 2022

 

TITLE:

Peer review of the Joint Strategy

From:

Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience, on 23 February 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report summarises the findings of an independent review of the Draft Te Tai Tokerau climate change adaptation strategy and accompanying documents (the Climate risks overview, community adaptation profiles and priority actions).  The review was undertaken by climate change policy expert, Dr Judy Lawrence and was commissioned to assess:

·          whether the strategy will enable effective adaptation in the context of the impacts and risks presented

·          whether the Strategy can be monitored for its effectiveness in adapting to climate change impacts

The review makes observations from the perspective of the national climate change risk assessment and the national mandate for adaptation to reduce climate change impacts and risks in a timely and effective manner.

Recommendations include additional actions and reprioritisation of actions.  Overall, the review is positive and complimentary of the collective approach applied in developing the draft strategy.  

A copy of the review is Attached.  At this point staff do not recommend changing the draft strategy in response to the recommendations of the review; this is because there are central government initiatives pending that are likely to lead to other changes (including the national climate change adaptation plan due in August 2022).

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

1.    That the report ‘Peer review of the Joint Strategy’ by Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist and dated 9 February 2022, be received.

 

2.    The Committee agree to incorporating the findings of the peer review into a wider review of the strategy later this year once pending central government initiatives are available (such as the National Adaptation and Emissions Reduction plans). 

 

Background/Tuhinga

An independent review of the Draft Te Tai Tokerau climate change adaptation strategy and accompanying documents (the Climate risks overview, community adaptation profiles and priority actions) was made available in early January 2022.  The review was undertaken by climate change policy expert, Dr Judy Lawrence was commissioned to assess whether the strategy will enable effective adaptation in the context of the impacts and risks presented and whether the Strategy can be monitored for its effectiveness in adapting to climate change impacts.

The review makes observations from the perspective of the national climate change risk assessment and the national mandate for adaptation to reduce climate change impacts and risks in a timely and effective manner.

 

Overall, the review was complimentary of the comprehensive regional and collective approach to developing a Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for the Northland Region.  Key findings from the review are summarised below:

 

 

 

 

Overall comments

·    The Vision, Mission Principles and Objectives are all sound.  The vision of “resilient to climate change” could be teased out further to avoid misinterpretation in a climate change context and would be improved by replacing “resilient” with “adaptive”

·    By aligning (cross jurisdictional boundary impacts) and enabling specific individual adaptations, the strategy has potential for consistency with regional values and culture and greater cost-effectiveness than councils’ acting alone.

·    The ability of responses to be flexible will be paramount in the short-term to avoid locking in one “solution” only or “business as usual”, which will not be fit for purpose under changing climate conditions.

·    Taking the strategy to action in the face of change and accelerating and worsening of impacts will require clear prioritisation of effort in a timely and connected manner with governance and institutional mechanisms to embed them while also learning by doing.

·    Infrastructure and drought adaptations are critical because lack of integrated decisions will worsen the impacts on potable water supplies and human health effects arising, and access issues through disruption to roads will impede movement of people and goods and services vital for a resilient Northland.

 

The strategy

·    Comprehensive preparation and the ability to be “fleet of foot” will need to be embedded into statutory planning policies, plans and processes.  While the strategy recognises this, there are additional actions and ways of communicating them that could strengthen flexibility and the ability to implement risk reduction in an ongoing manner.

·    Working collaboratively will enable such interconnections to be maximised for effective adaptation.  However, these fundamental principles of cross jurisdiction and collaborative adaptation require consistent approaches (methodologies and assessment tools) and a planning framework to assess the adaptability of the actions and to build the capacity to adapt.

·    External risks highlighted include the need for governance from central government.  It would be helpful to say on what would make a difference in reducing the risks.

·    There are unused provisions in the RMA which could assist in the implementation of the Northland Strategy and their use need not wait until government changes the RM legislation.

·    Preparation through the planning system will enable actions being taken sooner in preparation for when funding issues are addressed in legislation, thus reducing the delay in adaptation action.  The Strategy could highlight the opportunities available mandated by the law currently as a means of addressing the implementation gap.

·    Risk assessments, adaptive planning and emissions reductions planning can go hand in hand. Risk assessments can be used to prioritise different infrastructure across time and space.

·    The methodologies used for the risk assessment are aligned with the National Risk Assessment and the national guidance for hazard management.

·    Overemphasising nature-based solutions will raise expectations of protection that cannot be realised and delay more effective adaptations options that will inevitably be needed.

·    The water availability issues are stark for Northland and well identified.  The provision of potable water supplies is a national key climate change risk which could drive Northland priorities for water availability, and which are stated as unresolved.

·    A comprehensive plan for water use in the face of climate change would be a good precaution, rather than only ad hoc actions (rainwater tanks) and the promise of more certainty from models.  This is an area for a more robust set of priority actions.

·    The review section does not outline how the reviews will be implemented.  There is also a lack of clear proactivity in the review actions.

 

Community adaptation profiles

·    The first pass community adaptation risk profiles are particularly useful in identifying priority areas for attention.  The methodology is an exemplar for other regions, since it is not just a snapshot of hazards, but a risk assessment for the future using a range of scenarios.

·    A decision maker may conclude that periodic inundation can be adapted to, and that permanent inundation (total loss) is some distance in the future.  This could therefore be misleading since adaptation thresholds are likely to occur well before 2080.  It would be wise to present the material in Table 3 in a way that does not imply responses can wait until 2080.

 

Priority Actions

·    The priority actions list is a static table.  For management purposes and to realise changing adaptation needs it could be complemented with a dynamic way of linking dependencies between priority issues and finding synergies between them that could reduce siloed decision making around each issue.

·    Priority action 26 could apply to all domains not just ecosystems and biodiversity and could be added as an overriding action in this context.

·    Some existing actions will need to change as hazards worsen and risks increase.  These would be picked up via the monitoring system that is embedded in organisational processes in a transparent manner as anticipated in the Strategy.

·    Most of the actions relate to getting more information, continuing BAU actions or developing community engagement. Additional actions around developing planning and monitoring frameworks and prioritizing administrative processes could be added so as not to delay decisions on actions while more information is sought.

 

Climate risk overview

·    The climate risk overview is a thorough assessment of the regional impacts and risks.

·    While different agencies are noted with different responsibilities how these agencies interface for decisions on the different risks is unclear

·    While different agencies are noted with different responsibilities how these agencies interface for decisions on the different risks is unclear.  To do this effectively will require tailored processes to avoid single agency actions that embed further climate change impacts.

·    The language assumes “protect” type of adaptation, this could be misunderstood in the context of an adaptive plan which anticipates the risk through planning and provides flexibility

·    The notes on Māori impacts seems counterintuitive.  The text talks about prioritising Māori vulnerability yet there is the intention not to do an adaptation implementation plan.  This may not be the intention, but the language suggests otherwise and should be clarified to avoid misunderstandings.

·    The use of impact chains is a clear way of demonstrating impacts across domains of interest, however the chains are light on Governance implications however the coastal flooding example has mixed up impacts with governance solutions.  Further work on the governance implications would enable this to be clarified.

 

The review has identified some useful commentary on the strategy and associated documents for consideration by the Committee.  Staff do not recommend any changes to the documents at this point given:

·    Any material changes at this point would potentially delay adoption of the draft strategy by councils (intended for April council meetings).

·    The government will be releasing a National Adaptation Plan and an Emission Reduction Plan later this year.  It would be more efficient to incorporate the peer review findings into a wider review once these central government initiatives are available.

·    The peer review did not identify any major omissions or significant issues that require urgent changes.

 

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Te Tai Tokerau Draft Climate Change Adaptation Strategy Peer Review   


Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee  ITEM: 6.3

7 March 2022Attachment 1

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Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee                                                    item: 6.4

7 March 2022

 

TITLE:

Update on branding and identity process, including snapshot

From:

Mary De Ruyter, Communications Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience and Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement, on 23 February 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

The branding and identity workshop was held on January 26 at Hihiaua Cultural Centre, Whangārei. Level, a Whangārei-based strategic marketing and design agency, facilitated the session. 

The kōrero covered many topics including identifying the values and goals of the climate adaptation group, how we hope to empower and collaborate with communities, thinking more deeply about the different views people hold about climate change, and more. Level is beginning their work with this material.

Leading on from the workshop, the timeline of deliverables for the launch of the branding and identity has been reviewed.  Deciding on the best pūrākau (ancient stories) to share, in a culturally safe and respectful manner, and weaving that into the project identity is a process that cannot be rushed.  It’s also a vital part of the branding and identity process, reflecting the partnership inherent in this mahi. (See background section for more details.)

Update to timeline and deliverables:

·   Delay the larger public-facing launch of the Joint Climate Adaptation Te Tai Tokerau until the branding mahi is done.

·   Next step: CATT and the comms team are currently discussing the next step. We need to establish an appropriate engagement approach, and the planning/design for this may involve the CATT group, the comms team, and participation from Justice Hetaraka and Ripeka Read. We will be meeting soon to talk through how best to run this.

·   By end of April 2022: Create an interim website that hosts the strategy and details including a list of those involved, but with no identifiable branding; this is similar to the start of the Kaipara Moana Remediation Programme.  Hosting the strategy on an independent website from the beginning sends a clear message that no one organisation leads this mahi. The website will be launched when the final council approves strategy. When the project name is decided upon and identity established, the placeholder URL can be redirected to the new, branded website.

·   Estimated July 2022: Be ready with all collateral (snapshot in English and Te Reo, website, social media messaging etc) to launch the Joint Climate Adaptation Te Tai Tokerau in a region-wide coordinated way, once branding and identity work are complete.

 

Holding back the snapshot and other comms until the branding is finalised ensures the story people are hearing is complete from the start and is a much stronger position from a comms perspective.  

The social media that accompanies our region-wide public Joint Climate Adaptation Te Tai Tokerau launch will discuss topics that are relevant to Northlanders (risks around roading, river floods and biodiversity, water resilience, and coastal adaptation), and offer much more scope for engagement than only the strategy launch.

The comms team has done work on editing the snapshot, focusing on making the text more understandable and creating a greater sense of urgency.  We will continue to develop this in parallel with our other collateral (website, social media, etc).  The te reo version will be redone when the final text is established.

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Update on branding and identity process, including snapshot’ by Mary De Ruyter, Communications Specialist and dated 9 February 2022, be received.

 

Background/Tuhinga

A key element of the branding work is kōrero with Northland tohunga around the pūrākau it’s appropriate to share regarding climate change. The idea was raised of holding a public event that also offers an opportunity for wider engagement.  If it was appropriate to do this, councillors from all four councils and the public can be invited to attend, offering an opportunity to hear stories and learn different perspectives of climate change. This element of the branding/identity is still to be worked through.  Consideration will be given to who is contacted, and how the kōrero is shared (intimate setting vs symposium vs online symposium vs ‘tohunga talks’ event).

The opportunity to involve Justice Hetaraka and Ripeka Read in those processes because of their relationships with the tohunga, their experience in hearing and sharing kōrero, and their talent around communication.  If they are keen to be involved, there will need to be a discussion around what time and resources are needed.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil