Council

Tuesday 28 June 2022 at 10.30am

 

 

AGENDA

 


Council Meeting

28 June 2022

Northland Regional Council Agenda

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chamber

36 Water Street, Whangārei

on Tuesday 28 June 2022, commencing at 10.30am

 

Recommendations contained in the council agenda are NOT council decisions. Please refer to council minutes for resolutions.

 

RĪMITI (Item)                                                                                                                                                                 Page

1.0       Ngā Mahi Whakapai (Housekeeping)

Key Health and Safety points to note:

·         If the fire alarm goes off – exit down the stairwell to the assembly point which is the visitor carpark.

·         Earthquakes – drop, cover and hold

·         Visitors please make sure you have signed in at reception, and that you sign out when you leave. Please wear your name sticker.

·         The toilets are on the opposite side of the stairwell.

·         Please adhere to the recommended Covid alert guidance that applies.

2.0       Karakia Timatanga – Tauāki ā roto (Opening karakia)

3.0       Ngā Whakapahā (apologies)

4.0       Ngā Whakapuakanga (DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICTS OF INTEREST)

5.0       Ngā Whakaae Miniti me te Mahere Mahi (Council Minutes and Action Sheet)

5.1       Confirmation of Minutes - Council Meeting 24 May 2022 and Annual Plan Deliberations 24 May 2022                                                                                                                                                                 6

5.2       Receipt of Action Sheet                                                                                                                          16

6.0       Ngā Ripoata Putea (Financial Reports)

6.1       Financial Report to 31 May 2022                                                                                                        18

7.0       Ngā Take (Decision Making Matters)

7.1       Rates for the year 1 July 2022 to 30 June 2023                                                                              23

7.2       Adoption of Annual Plan 2022/23                                                                                                       43

7.3       Adoption of User Fees and Charges 2022/23 | Kaupapa Here a Utu                                   116

7.4       Biosecurity Operational Plan 2022-2023                                                                                        181

7.5       Submissions on freshwater and indigenous biodiversity national instruments               211

7.6       Te Mana o Te Wai Funding                                                                                                                  214

7.7       Tangata Whenua Environmental Monitoring Fund - draft allocation policy                     218

7.8       Formal endorsement of submission made into the National Adaptation Plan by the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee                                                                                                         224

8.0       Ngā Ripoata Mahi (Operational Reports)

8.1       Chair's Report to Council                                                                                                                     267

8.2       Chief Executive’s Report to Council                                                                                                 269

9.0       Receipt of Committee Minutes and Working Party/Group Updates

9.1       Receipt of Committee Minutes                                                                                                          303

9.2       Working Party Updates and Chairpersons' Briefings                                                                 322

10.0    Kaupapa ā Roto (Business with the Public Excluded)                                                           324

10.1    Confirmation of confidential minutes - council meeting 24 May 2022

10.2    Human Resources Report - May 2022

10.3    Regional Projects Reserve: Investment proposal for Kaipara Water Scheme

10.4    Purchase of Whangārei CBD Properties   


 

ACC - Accident Compensation Corporation

ALGIM - Association of Local Government Information Management

AMA - Aquaculture Management Area

AMP - Asset Management Plan/Activity Management Plan

AP - Annual Plan

BOI - Bay of Islands

BOPRC - Bay of Plenty Regional Council

CAPEX - Capital Expenditure (budget to purchase assets)

CBEC - Community, Business and Environment Centre

CCO – Council Controlled Organisation

CCTO – Council Controlled Trading Organisation

CDEM - Civil Defence Emergency Management

CEEF – Chief Executives Environment Forum

CEG - Co-ordinating Executive Group

CEO - Chief Executive Officer

CIMS - Co-ordinated Incident Management System (emergency management structure)

CMA - Coastal Marine Area

CPCA - Community Pest Control Areas

CRI - Crown Research Institute

DHB - District Health Board 

DOC - Department of Conservation

DP – District Plan

E350 – Extension 350 programme

ECA - Environmental Curriculum Award

ECAN - Environment Canterbury

EECA - Energy Efficiency Conservation Authority

EF - Environment Fund

EMA - Employers and Manufacturers Association

EOC - Emergency Operations Centre

EPA - Environmental Protection Authority

ETS - Emissions Trading Scheme

FDE - Farm Dairy Effluent

FNDC - Far North District Council

FNHL - Far North Holdings Limited

FPP - First Past the Post

GE - Genetic Engineering

GIS - Geographic Information System

GMO - Genetically Modified Organism

HBRC - Hawke's Bay Regional Council

HEMP - Hapū Environmental Management Plan

Horizons - Brand name of Manawatu-Wanganui Regional Council

HR - Human Resources

HSNO - Hazardous Substances & New Organisms Act 

HSWA - Health and Safety at Work Act 2015

IEMP - Iwi Environmental Management Plan

ILGACE - Iwi and Local Government Chief Executives Forum

IPPC - Invited Private Plan Change

IRIS - Integrated Regional Information System

KDC - Kaipara District Council 

KPI - Key Performance Indicator

LAWA – Land, Air, Water Aotearoa

LEA - Local Electoral Act 2001

LGA - Local Government Act 2002

LGNZ - Local Government New Zealand

LGOIMA - Local Government Official Information & Meetings Act 1987

LIDAR – Light detection and ranging

LTI – Long time injury

LTP - Long Term Plan

MBIE – Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment

MFE - Ministry for the Environment

MFL – Māori Freehold Land 

MHWS - Mean High Water Springs

MMH - Marsden Maritime Holdings Limited

MNZ - Maritime New Zealand

MOH - Ministry of Health

MOT - Ministry of Transport

MPI - Ministry for Primary Industries

MSD - Ministry of Social Development

NCMC - National Crisis Management Centre

NDHB - Northland District Health Board

NEMA – National Emergency Management Agency

NES - National Environmental Standards

NFT – Northland Forward Together

NGO - Non-Governmental Organisation

NIF - Northland Intersectoral Forum

NINC - Northland Inc. Limited

NIWA - National Institute of Water and Atmosphere

NORTEG - Northland Technical Advisory Group

NPS - National Policy Statement

NZCPS - New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement

NZRC - New Zealand Refining Company (Marsden Point)

NZTA – Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency

NZTE - New Zealand Trade and Enterprise

NZWWA - New Zealand Water and Wastes Association

OFI - Opportunity for Improvement\

OPEX – Operating Expenditures

OSH - Occupational Safety & Health

OTS – Office of Treaty Settlements

PCBU - Person Conducting Business or Undertaking

PGF – Provincial Growth Fund

PPE - Personal Protective Equipment

RAP - Response Action Plan

RBI - Regional Broadband Initiative

RCP - Regional Coastal Plan

RFI - Request for Information

RFP - Request for Proposal

RLTP - Regional Land Transport Plan

RMA - Resource Management Act 1991

RMG - Resource Managers Group (Regional Councils)

RMZ - Riparian Management Zone

ROI - Return on Investment

RP – Regional Plan

RPMP - Regional Pest Management Plan

RPMS - Regional Pest Management Strategy

RPS - Regional Policy Statement

RPTP – Regional Public Transport Plan

RRSAP – Regional Road Safety Action Plan

RSG – Regional Sector Group

RSHL - Regional Software Holdings Ltd

RTC - Regional Transport Committee

RTO - Regional Tourism Organisation

SIG – Special Interest Group

SIPO - Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives

SITREP - Situation Report

SOE - State of Environment (or) State Owned Enterprise

SOI – Statement of Intent

SOLGM - Society of Local Government Managers

STV - Single Transferable Vote

TAG - Technical Advisory Group

Tier 1 - Site level plan or response for an oil spill

Tier 2 - Regional level plan or response to an oil spill

Tier 3 - National level plan or response to an oil spill

TLA - Territorial Local Authority – City & District Councils

TON – Top of the North (regions)

TTMAC – Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party

TTNEAP – Tai Tokerau Northland Economic Action Plan

TMP - Treasury Management Plan

TOR - Terms of Reference

TPK - Te Puni Kōkiri (Ministry of Maori Development)

TUANZ - Telecommunications Users Association of NZ

UNISA - Upper North Island Strategic Alliance

WDC - Whangarei District Council

WHHIF - Whangarei Harbour Health Improvement Fund

WRC - Waikato Regional Council

WSMP - Workplace Safety Management Practices

 

 

 



Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 5.1

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Confirmation of Minutes - Council Meeting 24 May 2022 and Annual Plan Deliberations 24 May 2022

From:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist

Authorised by:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist, on 21 June 2022

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the minutes of the council meeting held on 24 May 2022 and the Annual Plan Deliberations held on 24 May 2022 be confirmed as true and correct record.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Minutes of the council meeting - 24 May 2022

Attachment 2: Minutes of the Annual Plan Deliberations - 24 May 2022   


Council Meeting  ITEM: 5.1

28 June 2022Attachment 1

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 5.1

28 June 2022Attachment 2

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 5.2

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Receipt of Action Sheet

From:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist

Authorised by:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist, on 21 June 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

The purpose of this report is to enable the meeting to receive the current action sheet.

 

Nga mahi tutohutia / Recommendation

That the action sheet be received.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Council Action Sheet - June 2022   


Council Meeting  ITEM: 5.2

28 June 2022Attachment 1

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 6.1

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Financial Report to 31 May 2022

From:

Vincent McColl, Financial Accountant and Taka Skipwith, Financial Accountant

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 21 June 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report is to inform council of the year to date (YTD) financial result to May 2022. Council has achieved a YTD surplus after transfers to and from reserves of $4.89M, which is $75K favourable to budget (April YTD per agenda was $1.5M favourable to budget and then updated verbally at the meeting to $1.1M).  This result includes May losses on externally managed funds of ($877K).

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Financial Report to 31 May 2022’ by Vincent McColl, Financial Accountant and Taka Skipwith, Financial Accountant and dated 14 June 2022, be received.

 

Background/Tuhinga

  

 

 


 

 

 

Revenue

Year to date revenue is $59.52M, which is $2.27M or 3.7% below budget. 

 


Expenditure

Year to date expenditure is $49.3M, which is $4.9M or 9.1% below budget. 

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 6.1

28 June 2022

The finance team are actively working towards including all unreported expenditure for this financial year and are identifying carry forward expenditure for the next financial year.


 

 

Salary Variances

Across council there is a $1.33M (April YTD: $1.28M) favourable salaries variance predominantly due to the time to complete recruitment of positions identified in the LTP (Long Term Plan) and some vacancies already present at the end of 2020/21. The salary variance is broken down below:

 

May YTD

April YTD

Gross salary variance

$1.25M

$1.19M

Add: unbudgeted KMR salaries offset with budgeted grant expenditure

$523K

$441K

Less: Subsidised work programmes

($152K)

($133K)

Less: Annual leave earned not taken

($286K)

($218K)

Net salary variance

$1.33M

$1.28M

 

 

Transfers to reserves

For the year to date there has been a net transfer to reserves of $5.3M compared to a budgeted net transfer to reserves of $2.78M.  This is predominantly due to:

Ÿ $1.68M more than budgeted transfers to flood infrastructure river reserves due to higher than budgeted subsidies for capital flood works.

Ÿ $130K higher than budgeted transfers from the investment growth reserves due, due to timing of economic development grants.

Ÿ $105K more than budgeted transfers to transport reserves due to lower than budgeted YTD expenditure. This consists of $112K for Far North transport reserve offset by ($7K) for the Whangarei transport reserve.

Ÿ $650K more than budgeted transfers to the Kaipara Moana Remediation reserve due to the Kaipara Maurikura not yet requiring funding this financial year.

Ÿ $1.5M lower than budgeted transfers from the enterprise system reserve representing lower costs than budgeted at this stage of the project.

Ÿ $99K lower than budged transfers to Sporting Facilities Reserve, due to works not occurring as budgeted.

Ÿ $1.1M lower than budget transfer to group investment reserves, due to poor return on long term funds.

 

 

Capital Expenditure

Capital expenditure of $5.64M is lower than the budget of $5.95M due to the timing of expenditure on flood works work programmes.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.1

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Rates for the year 1 July 2022 to 30 June 2023

From:

Casey Mitchell, Management Accountant; Kim Harvey, Assistant Management Accountant and Shivam Shivam, Planning and Reporting Officer

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 22 June 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

Under sections 23, 24, 57 and 58 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 (LGRA), the council is required to set its rates, due dates and penalty regime by resolution.

This paper provides for the council to set its rates, due dates, and penalty regime for the year commencing on 1 July 2022 and ending on 30 June 2023.

This paper has been prepared in accordance with the revenue and financing policy and rates section (including the funding impact statement) contained within the 2022-2023 Annual Plan.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Rates for the year 1 July 2022 to 30 June 2023 by Casey Mitchell, Management Accountant; Kim Harvey, Assistant Management Accountant and Shivam Shivam, Planning and Reporting Officer and dated 9 May 2022, be received.

2.         That council notes that it has had regard to section 100T of the Biosecurity Act 1993 and confirms that its analysis of Section 100T of the Biosecurity Act 1993, as included in the Long Term Plan 2021-2031, remains appropriate in relation to setting the Pest Management Rate for 2022-2023.

3.         That the Northland Regional Council resolves to set the following rates under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 (LGRA) for the financial year commencing 1 July 2022 and ending 30 June 2023:

a.         Targeted council services rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA. The rate is calculated on the total projected capital value, as determined by the certificate of projected valuation of each constituent district in the Northland region.  An additional $1.73 (including GST) per each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit is to be assessed across the Whangārei constituency to provide funding for the ongoing maintenance of the Hātea River Channel.  The rate is differentiated by location in the Northland region and assessed as a fixed amount per each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit in the Far North and Whangārei districts, and on each rateable rating unit (RU) in the Kaipara district.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                  Including GST

Far North District                                                                                                        $140.02 per SUIP

Kaipara District                                                                                                                $169.14 per RU

Whangārei District                                                                                                      $158.26 per SUIP

The Whangārei District targeted council services rate amount of $158.26 (including GST) per SUIP includes funding for the Hātea River Channel amount of $1.73 (including GST).

 

 

b.         Targeted land and freshwater management rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is assessed on the land value of each rateable rating unit in the region.  The rate is set per dollar of land value.  The rate per dollar of land value is different for each constituent district because the rate is allocated based on projected land value, as provided for in section 131 of the LGRA.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                  Including GST

Far North District                                                                    $0.0003835 per dollar of land value

Kaipara District                                                                        $0.0003565 per dollar of land value

Whangārei District                                                                 $0.0002780 per dollar of land value

               

c.         Targeted pest management rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is calculated on the total projected capital value, as determined by the certificate of projected valuation of each constituent district in the Northland region.  The rate is a fixed amount, differentiated by location in the Northland region.  The rate will be assessed on each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit in the Far North and Whangārei districts, and each rateable rating unit (RU) in the Kaipara District.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Far North District                                                                                                         $71.77 per SUIP

Kaipara District                                                                                                                 $86.69 per RU

Whangārei District                                                                                                       $80.23 per SUIP

 

d.         Targeted flood infrastructure rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is a fixed amount assessed on each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit in the Far North and Whangārei districts, and each rateable rating unit (RU) in the Kaipara District.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Far North District                                                                                                         $33.24 per SUIP

Kaipara District                                                                                                                 $33.24 per RU

Whangārei District                                                                                                       $33.24 per SUIP

 

e.         Targeted emergency and hazard management rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is calculated on the total projected capital value, as determined by the certificate of projected valuation of each constituent district in the Northland region.  The rate is a fixed amount, differentiated by location in the Northland region.  The rate will be assessed on each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit in the Far North and Whangārei districts, and each rateable rating unit (RU) in the Kaipara District.  The rate is set as follows:

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Far North District                                                                                                         $40.15 per SUIP

Kaipara District                                                                                                                 $48.50 per RU

Whangārei District                                                                                                       $44.88 per SUIP

 

f.          Targeted emergency services rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is a fixed amount assessed on each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit in the Far North and Whangārei districts, and each rateable rating unit (RU) in the Kaipara District.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Far North District                                                                                                         $11.60 per SUIP

Kaipara District                                                                                                                 $11.60 per RU

Whangārei District                                                                                                       $11.60 per SUIP

 

g.         Targeted regional sporting facilities rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is a fixed amount assessed on each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit in the Far North and Whangārei districts, and each rateable rating unit (RU) in the Kaipara District. The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Far North District                                                                                                         $16.60 per SUIP

Kaipara District                                                                                                                 $16.60 per RU

Whangārei District                                                                                                       $16.60 per SUIP

 

h.         Targeted regional economic development rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  This rate is assessed on the land value of each rateable rating unit in the region.  The rate is set per dollar of land value.  The rate per dollar of land value is different for each constituent district, because the rate is allocated based on projected land value, as provided for in section 131 of the LGRA.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                  Including GST

Far North District                                                                    $0.0000260 per dollar of land value

Kaipara District                                                                        $0.0000242 per dollar of land value

Whangārei District                                                                 $0.0000188 per dollar of land value

 

 

 

 

 

i.          Targeted Whangārei transport rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is a fixed amount assessed on each rateable separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit (SUIP) in the Whangārei District.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Whangārei District                                                                                                       $38.47 per SUIP

 

j.          Targeted Far North transport rate

A targeted rate as authorised by the LGRA.  The rate is a fixed amount assessed on each rateable separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit (SUIP) in the Far North District.  The rate is set as follows:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Far North District                                                                                                            $8.79 per SUIP

 

k.         Targeted Awanui River management rate

A targeted rate set under the LGRA, set differentially by location and area of benefit as defined in the Awanui River Flood Management Plan, and as defined in the following table:

The rate is set differentially as follows:

Category

Description

Rate including GST

 

UA

Urban rate class UA (floodplain location) $285.53 direct benefit plus $28.19 indirect benefit per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit (SUIP).

$313.72 per SUIP

 

UA

Urban rate class UA – commercial differential.

$941.16 per SUIP

 

UF

Urban rate classes UF (higher ground) $28.19 direct benefit plus $28.19 indirect benefit per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit.

$56.38 per SUIP

 

 

UF

Urban rate class UF – commercial differential.

$169.14 per SUIP

 

Rural

Rural rate differentiated by class, $11.75 per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit (SUIP) of indirect benefit plus a rate per hectare for each of the following classes of land in the defined Kaitāia flood rating district as illustrated in the following maps and table.

$11.75 per SUIP

 

Class

Description

Rate including GST

 

A & B

High benefit: rural land which receives high benefit from the Awanui scheme works due to reduced river flooding risk and/or reduced duration of flooding and/or coastal flooding – all rateable land other that in the commercial differential.

 

$23.33 per hectare

 

A & B commercial differential

$69.99 per hectare

C

Moderate benefit: land floods less frequently and water clears quickly – all rateable land other that in the commercial differential.

 

$10.90 per hectare

 

C commercial differential

$32.70 per hectare

F

Contributes runoff waters and increases the need for flood protection - all rateable land other that in the commercial differential.

$0.77 per hectare

 

F commercial differential

$2.31 per hectare

 

The rating classifications are illustrated in the following maps:

 

 

 

 

I.             Targeted Kaihū River management rate

 

A targeted rate set under the LGRA, and set differentially by location and area of benefit as defined in the following table:

Class

Description

Rate Including GST

 

A

Land on the floodplain and side valleys downstream of Rotu Bottleneck.

$23.13 per hectare

B

Land on the floodplain and tributary side valleys between Ahikiwi and the Rotu Bottleneck and in the Mangatara Drain catchment upstream of SH12.

$11.39 per hectare

F

Land within the Kaihū River rating area not falling within Class A and Class B.

$1.60 per hectare

Urban Contribution – A contribution from the Kaipara District Council instead of a separate rate per property:

$5,015 per annum

The rating classifications are illustrated in the following map:

l.          Targeted Kaeo-Whangaroa rivers management rate

A targeted rate set under the LGRA, set on a uniform basis in respect of each rateable separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit falling within the former Whangaroa Ward rating rolls of 100-199, as illustrated in the map below:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Former Whangaroa Ward                                                                                         $54.52 per SUIP

                                                                                                                                                                               

m.       Targeted Whangārei urban rivers management rate

A targeted rate set under the LGRA and assessed on all rateable properties defined by reference to the differential categories and differentiated by location (illustrated in the map below) and, for some categories, land use.  It is set as a fixed amount per each rateable separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit, as follows:

Category

 

Including GST

1

Commercial properties located in the Whangārei Central Business District flood area:

 

$351.22 per SUIP

2

Residential properties located in the Whangārei Central Business District flood area:

 

$172.08 per SUIP

3

Properties located in the contributing water catchment area (including properties falling in the Waiarohia, Raumanga, Kirikiri and Hātea River Catchments):

$42.13 per SUIP

 

Differential categories for the Whangārei urban rivers management rate:

Residential properties in the Whangārei central business district

Residential properties in the Whangārei central business district (CBD) flood area are defined as all rating units which are used principally for residential or lifestyle residential purposes, including retirement villages, flats etc.

Residential properties also includes multi-unit properties, these being all separate rating units used principally for residential purposes, and on which is situated multi-unit type residential accommodation that is used principally for temporary or permanent residential accommodation and for financial reward, including, but not limited to, hotels, boarding houses, motels, tourist accommodation, residential clubs and hostels but excluding any properties that are licensed under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

Commercial properties in the Whangārei central business district

Commercial properties in the Whangārei CBD flood area are all separate rating units used principally for commercial, industrial or related purposes or zoned for commercial, industrial or related purposes in accordance with the Whangārei district plan.  For the avoidance of doubt, this category includes properties licensed under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol 2012; and private hospitals and private medical centres.

 

n.         Targeted Taumārere rivers management rate

A targeted rate set under the LGRA, set on a uniform basis in respect of each rateable separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit falling within the Tamārere, as illustrated in the map below:

                                                                                                                                                Including GST

Taumārere                                                                                                                      $67.15 per SUIP

 

Map

Description automatically generated

4.         That the Northland Regional Council resolves the following with respect to payment dates for rates and the penalty regime::

Far North District constituency:

The Northland Regional Council resolves that all rates within the Far North District constituency are payable in four equal instalments, on the following dates:

Instalment

Due date for payment

Instalment 1

20 August 2022

Instalment 2

20 November 2022

Instalment 3

20 February 2023

Instalment 4

20 May 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Northland Regional Council resolves to add the following penalties to unpaid Far North District constituency rates:

·      In accordance with section 58(1)(a) of the LGRA, a penalty of ten percent (10%) will be added to any portion of each instalment of Far North District constituency rates assessed in the 2022/23 financial year that is unpaid on or by the respective due date for payment as stated above.  These penalties will be added on the following dates:

Instalment

Date penalty will be added

Instalment 1

27 August 2022

Instalment 2

27 November 2022

Instalment 3

27 February 2023

Instalment 4

27 May 2023

 

Kaipara District constituency:

The Northland Regional Council resolves that all rates within the Kaipara District constituency are payable in four equal instalments, on the following dates:

Instalment

Due date for payment

Instalment 1

20 August 2022

Instalment 2

20 November 2022

Instalment 3

20 February 2023

Instalment 4

20 May 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Northland Regional Council resolves to add the following penalties to unpaid Kaipara District constituency rates:

·     In accordance with section 58(1) (a) of the LGRA, a penalty of ten percent (10%) of so much of each instalment of the Kaipara District constituency rates assessed in the 2022/23 financial year that are unpaid after the relevant due date for each instalment will be added on the relevant penalty date for each instalment stated below, except where a ratepayer has entered into an arrangement by way of direct debit authority, and honours that arrangement.  These penalties will be added on the following dates:

Instalment

Date penalty will be added

Instalment 1

21 August 2022

Instalment 2

21 November 2022

Instalment 3

21 February 2023

Instalment 4

21 May 2023

·     In accordance with section 58(1)(b) of the LGRA, a penalty of ten per cent (10%) of the amount of all Kaipara District constituency rates (including any penalties) from any previous financial years that are unpaid on 5 July 2022 will be added on 7 July 2022.

·     In accordance with section 58(1)(c) of the LGRA, a penalty of ten per cent (10%) of the amount of all Kaipara District constituency rates to which a penalty has been added under the point immediately above and which remain unpaid on 10 January 2023 will be added on 11 January 2023.

 

Whangārei District constituency:

The Northland Regional Council resolves that all rates within the Whangārei District constituency are payable in four equal instalments, on the following dates:

Instalment

Due date for payment

Instalment 1

20 August 2022

Instalment 2

20 November 2022

Instalment 3

20 February 2023

Instalment 4

20 May 2023

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Northland Regional Council resolves to add the following penalties to unpaid Whangārei District constituency rates:

·     In accordance with section 58(1)(a) of the LGA, a penalty of ten percent (10%) will be added to any portion of each instalment of Whangārei District constituency rates assessed in the 2022/23 financial year that is unpaid on or by the respective due date for payment as stated above.  These penalties will be added on the following dates:

Instalment

Date penalty will be added

Instalment 1

24 August 2022

Instalment 2

23 November 2022

Instalment 3

23 February 2023

Instalment 4

24 May 2023

·     In accordance with section 58(1)(b) of the LGRA, a penalty of ten per cent (10%) will be added to any Whangārei District constituency rates (including any penalties) from any financial year prior to 1 July 2022 that still remain unpaid as at 5 July 2022.  This penalty will be added on 7 September 2022. 

 

The district councils have advised that their rates adoption dates are as follows:

·      Far North District Council – 30 June 2022

·      Kaipara District Council – 28 June 2022

·      Whangarei District Council – 30 June 2022.

Should their collection and/or penalty dates change through the rate setting process we will need to amend our resolution accordingly.

 

Background/Tuhinga

The Northland Regional Council is scheduled to adopt its 2022-2023 Annual Plan at the council meeting to be held on 28 June 2022.  Following the adoption of the Revenue and Financing Policy and the 2022-2023 Annual Plan, all formal requirements to resolve the rates for the year ended 30 June 2023 are in place and permit the following resolution to proceed.

The final rates have been calculated in accordance with the resolutions made by council on 24 May 2022; and the updated rating units, separately used or inhabited parts of a rating unit (SUIPs), capital values and land values provided by the district councils.

Under section 23 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 (LGRA) the council is required to set its rates by resolution.  This paper provides for the council to set rates for the year commencing on 1 July 2022 and ending on 30 June 2023.

Rates for the 2022/23 year are set out on a GST inclusive basis.  This means that the amount of the rates stated includes the council’s GST obligations.  Penalties are added to the amount of unpaid rates.

Section 24 of the LGRA requires that the council state the due date for payment of the rates in its resolution setting rates.

Under section 55 of the LGRA, the council may provide for a discount on the rates if payment is made by a specified date before the due date or dates, in accordance with a policy made under section 55. Currently no council in Northland applies this policy.

Section 57 of the LGRA states that a local authority may, by resolution, authorise penalties to be added to rates that are not paid by the due date.  The resolution must state how the penalty is calculated and the date the penalty is to be added to the number of unpaid rates.  Section 58 of the LGRA sets out the penalties that may be imposed.

Pursuant to section 23(5) of the LGRA, within 20 working days after making a resolution, make the resolution publicly available on an Internet site maintained by it or on its behalf to which the public has free access.

Pursuant to section 28(4) of the LGRA the rating information database was made available for public inspection during May/June.

The full details of the rates calculations and rates collected from each constituent district of the Northland region will be as set out in the tables below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table One: Valuations by district (including equalised values)

SUIP = Separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit.

Gross no. rating units (Kaipara) or SUIPs (others)

Net no. rating units (Kaipara) or SUIPs (others)

Capital Value
$000's

Land Value
$000's

Equalised Capital Value
$000's

Equalised Land Value
$000's

Equalised CV%

Equalised LV%

Far North District

37,327

 36,351

$20,832,903

$10,194,639

$29,017,995

$14,313,191

34.86%

33.31%

Kaipara District

 14,634

 14,524

$10,861,036

$6,039,908

 $14,005,327

$7,908,075

16.82%

18.41%

Whangārei District

 46,421

 45,073

$39,437,762

 $20,400,298

 $40,225,797

$20,743,990

48.32%

48.28%

Total Valuation -

Northland

98,382

 95,948

$71,131,701

 $36,634,845

 $83,249,119

 $42,965,256

100.00%

100.00%

 


 

 

Table Two: Northland Regional Council rates for the 2022/23 financial year

 

Budgeted Rates 2022/23 (including GST)

Far North District

Kaipara District

Whangārei District

Total $
(gross)

Total $
(net)

Targeted council services rate

Rate per SUIP

$140.02

        

 

 

$5,226,527

$5,089,867

Rate per RU

 

           $169.14

 

 

$2,475,195

$2,456,589

Rate per SUIP

 

 

$158.26

$7,346,587

$7,133,253

 

 

 

 

$15,048,309

$14,679,709

 

Targeted land and freshwater management rate

Rate per $ of Actual LV

$0.0003835

 

 

 $3,909,644

 $3,878,687

Rate per $ of Actual LV

 

$0.0003565

 

$2,153,227

$2,142,590

Rate per $ of Actual LV

 

 

$0.0002780

$5,671,283

$5,621,215

 

 

 

 

$11,734,154

$11,642,492

Targeted pest management rate

Rate per SUIP

$71.77

 

 

 $2,678,959

$2,608,911

Rate per RU

 

$86.69

 

$1,268,621

$1,259,086

Rate per SUIP

 

 

$80.23

$3,724,357

$3,616,207

 

 

 

 

$7,671,937

$7,484,204

Targeted flood infrastructure rate

Rate per SUIP

$33.24

 

 

$1,240,749

 $1,208,307

Rate per RU

 

$33.24

 

$486,434

$482,778

Rate per SUIP

 

 

$33.24

$1,543,034

$1,498,227

 

 

 

 

$3,270,217

$3,189,312

Targeted emergency and hazard management rate

Rate per SUIP

$40.15

 

 

$1,498,679

$1,459,493

Rate per RU

 

$48.50

 

$709,749

 $704,414

Rate per SUIP

 

 

$44.88

$2,083,374

 $2,022,876

 

 

 

 

$4,291,802

$4,186,783

Targeted regional sporting facilities rate

Rate per SUIP

$16.60

 

 

$619,628

$603,427

Rate per RU

 

$16.60

 

$242,924

$241,098

Rate per SUIP

 

 

$16.60

$770,589

$748,212

 

 

 

 

 $1,633,141

$1,592,737

Targeted regional economic development rate

Rate per $ of Actual LV

$0.0000260

 

 

$265,061

$262,965

Rate per $ of Actual LV

 

$0.0000242

 

$146,166

$145,446

Rate per $ of Actual LV

 

 

$0.0000188

$383,526

$380,129

 

 

 

 

$794,752

$788,540

Targeted emergency services rate

Rate per SUIP

$11.60

 

 

$432,993

$421,672

Rate per RU

 

$11.60

 

$169,754

$168,478

Rate per SUIP

 

 

$11.60

$538,484

$522,847

 

 

 

 

$1,141,231

$1,112,997

Targeted Whangārei transport rate

Rate per SUIP

 

 

$38.47

$1,785,816

$1,733,958

Targeted Far North transport rate

Far North District

$8.79

 

 

$328,104

 $319,525

Targeted Awanui River management rate

Far North District - Rural

 

 

 

$190,286

$190,041

Far North District - Urban

 

 

 

$850,144

$838,734

 

 

 

 

$1,040,430

$1,028,775

Targeted Kaihū River management rate

Kaipara District (Kaihū river area only)

 

 

 

$79,869

$79,869

Targeted Kaeo-Whangaroa rivers management rate

Far North (Kaeo only)

$54.52

 

 

$121,860

$118,043

Targeted Taumārere rivers management rate

Far North (Otira-Moerewa/Kawakawa only)

$67.15

 

 

$116,102

$113,278

Targeted Whangārei urban rivers management rate

Rates per SUIP

 

 

 

$1,163,385

$1,142,580

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total rates

 

 

 

Gross $

Net $

Far North District

 

 

 

 $17,478,737

$17,112,950

Kaipara District

 

 

 

$7,731,941

$7,680,348

Whangārei District

 

 

 

$25,010,434

$24,419,504

TOTAL RATES

 

 

 

$50,221,110

$49,212,802

 


 

 

Options 

 

 

No. 

Option 

Advantages 

Disadvantages 

1 

Adopt the recommendations presented in this report 

Legally generate the rating revenue required to fund the council’s 2022/23 work programmes. 

None 

 

2 

Do not adopt the recommendations presented in this report 

None 

Inability to legally strike the 2022/23 rates.  Consequently, unless alternative funding streams were obtained, the council would fail to deliver all its 2022/23 work programmes. 

 

The staff’s recommended option is to adopt the recommendations presented in this report. 

 

Considerations

 

1.   Environmental Impact 

The work programmes that comprise the Annual Plan 2022-2023, funded by rates to the degree discussed in this paper, significantly increase council’s ability to respond to environmental issues and opportunities. 

The risks and impacts of these proposals have been considered by council by way of a series of workshops, and in council’s deliberations on the proposals by way of extraordinary council meeting on 24 May 2022. 

 

2.    Community views 

The impact of the 2022-2023 Annual Plan budgets on council’s rates has been consulted on with the community through the 2022-2023 Annual Plan consultative procedure in accordance with s82 of the Local Government Act 2002

 

3.    Māori impact statement 

Consultation on the council’s rates funding requirement was undertaken with māori as part of the 2022/2023 Annual Plan consultation process using existing relationship channels. 

 

4.    Financial implications 

This report discusses setting of rates for the 2022/23 financial year.  The financial impacts of the recommendations in this report are significant as it determines council’s ability to collect rate revenue. 

 

5.    Implementation issues 

No implementation issues are anticipated in setting rates for the 2022/23 financial year. 

 

6.    Significance and engagement 

The council’s 2022-2023 Annual Plan has been developed in accordance with sections 93 and 93A-93G of the Local Government Act 2002, and contains details of the proposed rates.  

The rates being set have been established as part of the 2022-2023 Annual Plan process that included consultation with the public who have had the opportunity to fully consider the issues and present their views to the council, which have in turn been taken into consideration.  

Consequently, this resolution is required to enact previous decisions of council through the annual plan process and is an administrative decision that does not itself trigger the Significance and Engagement Policy. 

The decisions in this report are in accordance with sections 76 to 82 of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002. 

The public will have access to the final 2022-2023 Annual Plan and rates resolution through the council’s website. 

 

7.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance 

This report has been independently reviewed by Lizzy Wiessing - Barrister, and meets all the statutory requirements under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 for the setting of 2022/23 rates.

 

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.2

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Adoption of Annual Plan 2022/23

From:

Nicola Hartwell, Corporate Planner

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 15 June 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

This report presents council’s Annual Plan for 2022/23.

 

The Annual Plan 2022/23 underwent a period of public consultation, with deliberations on the proposals taking place on 24 May 2022. 

 

Recommendations

1.         That the report ‘Adoption of Annual Plan 2022/23’ by Nicola Hartwell, Corporate Planner dated 26 May 2022, be received.

2.         That council sets and adopts the Annual Plan 2022/23 included as Attachment 1 pertaining to this item of the 28 June 2022 council agenda.

3.         That council authorises Bruce Howse, Group Manager – Corporate Services to make any necessary minor drafting, typographical, rounding, or presentation corrections to the Annual Plan 2022/23 prior to final publication of the document.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Set and adopt the Annual Plan 2022/23

The relevant activities can be funded and delivered as planned, and rates set in a timely manner for the 2022/23 financial year

None

2

Do not set and adopt the Annual Plan 2022/23

None

Council will be in breach of its statutory obligations and the relevant council activities will not receive funding to allow delivery of the service

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1, to set and adopt the Annual Plan 2022/23.

 

 

 

Considerations

1.         Environmental Impact

The initiatives presented as part of the Annual Plan 2022/23 enable more efficient delivery of services, and reduced vehicle emissions, with otherwise minimal environmental impact.

2.         Community views

The views of the community on the Annual Plan 2022/23 were obtained during a period of consultation in accordance with sections 82 and 83 of the LGA. Community views have been provided to council by way of links to full submissions and a summary of submissions report.

Council has considered the proposals included in the Annual Plan 2022/23 by way of a deliberations meeting held on 24 May 2022 that centred upon the public feedback received.

3.         Māori impact statement

While there were no proposals in the Annual Plan 2022/23 that were considered to have significant and specific impacts on Māori over and above those of the general public, the process of consultation included engagement with Māori. This occurred by way of a letter circulated via electronic direct mail to all iwi and hapū groups on council’s database.

4.         Financial implications

Financial implications are addressed in the Annual Plan 2022/23 and the Annual Plan Supporting Information document.

5.         Implementation issues

Nil

 

6.         Significance and engagement

Section 76AA of the LGA directs that council must adopt a policy setting out how significance will be determined, and the level of engagement that will be triggered.  This policy assists council in determining how to achieve compliance with the LGA requirements in relation to decisions.

The proposals set out in the Annual Plan 2022/23 triggered council’s significance and engagement policy, and the process of consultation and engagement has now been carried out.  The results of this engagement were summarised and provided to council to inform council’s deliberations on 24 May 2022 and its decision-making process. 

7.         Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

Section 95 of the LGA provides that council must adopt an annual plan before the end of each financial year.  If the Annual Plan 2022/23 is not adopted by council before 30 June 2022, council will be in breach of s 95(1) of the LGA. 

Background/Tuhinga

The Annual Plan 2022/23 identifies funding variations for council activities planned in its Long Term Plan 2021-31, highlighting the impact on council’s budget and regional rates.  The Annual Plan 2022/23 adds an extra $1.7 million in capital expenditure to replace council’s maritime vessel, to be funded by lending from the Local Government Funding Agency and repaid from the council services rate over 15 years.  The plan also adds $188,216 of additional operational expenditure to increase and improve the Whangārei CityLink public transport service. 

The proposed changes increase the total region-wide rate take in 2022/23 from the 13.79% approved in the LTP 2021-31, to 13.89% (0.1% difference). 

The Whangārei Transport rate increases by an extra $4.80 (approximately) per Whangārei ratepayer, for a year-on-year average increase of just over approximately $65 for Whangārei ratepayers.

There will be an increase in the region-wide rate of approximately $0.80 per ratepayer beginning in 2023/24, as a result of capital expenditure funding outlining in this annual plan.  

Council consulted on the proposed changes pursuant to ss 82 and 83 of the LGA during a month long period running from 26 March to 29 April 2022.  Council deliberated on the proposed changes and public feedback received on 24 May 2022. 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Annual Plan 2022 for adoption   


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.2

28 June 2022Attachment 1

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.3

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Adoption of User Fees and Charges 2022/23 | Kaupapa Here a Utu

From:

Robyn Broadhurst, Policy Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 22 June 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

This report presents council’s user fees and charges, and associated policy, contained within the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 schedule for setting and adoption by council.

 

This schedule underwent a period of public consultation concurrently with the Annual Plan 2022/23.

Recommendations

1.         That the report ‘Adoption of User Fees and Charges 2022/23 | Kaupapa Here a Utu’ by Policy Specialist and dated 11 May 2022, be received.

2.         That council sets and adopts the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 included as Attachment 1 pertaining to this item of the 28 June 2022 council agenda.

3.         That council authorises Group Manager – Corporate Excellence to make any necessary minor drafting, typographical, rounding, or presentation corrections to the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 prior to final publication of the document.

 

Options

Section 150 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) sets out the process by which a local authority may prescribe fees and charges in respect of any matter provided for, either under a bylaw or under any other enactment if the enactment does not authorise the local authority to charge a fee. Section 36 of the Resource Management Act 1991 authorises local authorities to fix charges and specifies that such charges must be fixed in the manner set out by section 150 of the LGA.

Council has completed a review of fees and charges and followed the relevant process for consultation required under sections 82 and 83 of the LGA.

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Set and adopt the User Fees and Charges 2022/23

Policy, fees and charges can be updated for the 2022/23 financial year

None

2

Do not set and adopt the User Fees and Charges 2022/23

None

Fees and charges will not be updated for the 2022/23 financial year, resulting in inaccurate costs, and the inability of council to recover the costs of activities

 

The staff’s recommended option is option 1, to set and adopt the User Fees and Charges 2022/2023.

Considerations

1.         Community views

The views of the community on the changes to the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 were obtained during a period of consultation in accordance with sections 82 and 83 of the LGA. Community views have been provided to council by way of links to full submissions and a summary of submissions report.

Council has considered the proposals included in the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 by way of a deliberations meeting held on 24 May 2022 that centred upon the public feedback received.

2.         Māori impact statement

While there were no proposals in the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 that were considered to have significant and specific impacts on Māori over and above those of the general public, the process of consultation included engagement with Māori. This occurred by way of a letter circulated via electronic direct mail to all iwi and hapū groups on council’s database.

3.         Financial implications

The User Fees and Charges 2022/23 sets out the fees and charges for the 2022/23 financial year, which make up a portion of council’s income sources. An estimation of the income received from these fees and charges, that contributes to budgeted income for the 2022/23 financial year, is reflected in the financial statements set out in council’s Annual Plan 2022/23.

4.         Significance and engagement

Section 76AA of the LGA directs that council must adopt a policy setting out how significance will be determined and the level of engagement that will be triggered. This policy assists council in determining how to achieve compliance with the LGA requirements in relation to decisions.

Consultation on the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 has been completed, achieving compliance with council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

5.         Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

The decision to confirm and adopt the User Fees and Charges 2022/23 is in accordance with section 150 of the LGA and is consistent with the policy and legislative requirements of the various pieces of legislation that council sets charges under. These are detailed in sections 2.1 – 2.6 of the User Fees and Charges 2022/23, and in addition to the LGA include the Resource Management Act, Northland Regional Council Navigation Safety Bylaw, Maritime Transport Act, the Biosecurity Act, and the Building Act.

 

Background/Tuhinga

The User Fees and Charges 2022/23 schedule contains the fees and charges that council is authorised to set under the various pieces of legislation that it works under. These are reviewed annually and have been done so, and consulted on, in conjunction with the process of developing the Annual Plan 2022/23.

All applicable fees and charges in the schedule have been adjusted for inflation with a rate of 2.4% applied as set by BERL.

In addition to the inflationary increase, the Pilotage and Shipping Navigation and Safety Services Fees have also been increased. Further minor amendments were made for clarity, including the removal of a note under tables 3.6.2 and 3.6.4 relating to the number of offices attending a site visit, which was the result of feedback received during consultation and subsequent council deliberation.

Vehicle rates (section 3.9.5) have also been updated in line with that set by IRD.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: User Fees and Charges 2022/23   


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.3

28 June 2022Attachment 1

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.4

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Biosecurity Operational Plan 2022-2023

From:

Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity, on 14 June 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

The attached Operational Plan has been prepared as a requirement of the Biosecurity Act 1993 section 100B and should be read in conjunction with the Northland Regional Pest and Marine Pathway Management Plan 2017–2027 (hereafter referred to as the Pest Plan).   It includes all species listed in the Pest Plan and describes how biosecurity programmes will be implemented during the 2022-2023 financial year.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Biosecurity Operational Plan 2022-2023’ by Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity and dated 14 June 2022, be received.

2.         That council approve the Biosecurity Operational Plan 2022-2023 in accordance with the Biosecurity Act section 100b.

3.         That council authorises the GM Biosecurity to make any necessary minor drafting, typographical, rounding, or presentation corrections to the Biosecurity Operational Plan 2022-2023.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Council approves the whole Operational Plan

Implementation of the rules and activities can proceed under the revised plan.

Nil

2

Council may request amendments on the grounds that the Operational Plan is inconsistent with the Pest Plan

Improved consistency with the Pest Plan is achieved.

The process for their confirmation by council will cause delays in implementation.

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option1.

Considerations

1.         Environmental Impact

This decision will have no foreseeable impact on the ability of council to respond to the impacts of climate change within the following year.

 

 

2.         Community views

Community views have been sought through the development of the Pest Plan and respective Long-Term Plans and Annual Plans.  Based on community feedback the Pest Plan and annual budgets have been set which this Biosecurity Operational Plan now implements.

 

3.         Māori impact statement

Similarly, Māori feedback and input has been sought through the development of the Pest Plan and respective Long-Term Plans and Annual Plans.  Based on this feedback the Pest Plan and annual budgets have been set which this Biosecurity Operational Plan now implements.  In addition, tāngata whenua members of the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council sit on the Biosecurity and Biodiversity Working Party and have had an opportunity to provide feedback and input into this Operational Plan.

4.         Financial implications

Budget for implementation is allocated as part of the current Long-Term Plan and Annual Plan.  Regular review of the Operational Plan will be undertaken as additional and any external funding allocations are confirmed. 

5.         Implementation issues

There are no known barriers to implementation of the current plan at this stage.

 

6.         Significance and engagement

In relation to Section 100B this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against the council’s Significance and Engagement Policy because the pest plan has previously been consulted on.  This decision concerns its implementation and is provided for in council’s Long-Term Plan and is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tāngata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

7.         Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

 The Operational Plan is consistent with the requirements of the Biosecurity Act 1993, section 100B and is consistent with the Pest Plan.

Background/Tuhinga

The Northland Operational Plan aims to be a concise and accurate reflection of the content of the Pest Plan.  Reviews of the Operational Plan can be undertaken during the year, and staff believe this will be important as additional government funding for activities such as the national plan for kauri protection and PF2050 become clearer.

Section 100B of the Biosecurity Act states that the Operational Plan will be completed within three months of the end of the financial year and is now presented for council approval having been considered and endorsed by the Biosecurity and Biodiversity Working Party in May.

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Biosecurity Operational Plan 2022-2023   


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.4

28 June 2022Attachment 1

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.5

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Submissions on freshwater and indigenous biodiversity national instruments

From:

Ben Lee, Planning and Policy Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Jonathan Gibbard, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 15 June 2022

 

Executive Summary | Whakarāpopototanga

Government has released an exposure draft of prosed changes to the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (2020) and the National Environmental Standards for Freshwater (2020). It is recommended that council make a submission, and the content be approved by a small group of councillors and signed by the chair.

Government has also released on the Draft National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity – Exposure draft.  It was only released on 9 June 2022 and at the time of writing staff had not had time to consider it.  Staff will provide a verbal update at the council meeting as to whether council should make a submission.  If council decides to make a submission, it is recommended the content be approved by a small group of councillors and signed by the chair.

 

Recommendations

1.         That the report ‘Submissions on freshwater and indigenous biodiversity national instruments’ by Ben Lee, Planning and Policy Manager and dated 7 June 2022, be received.

2.         That council make a submission on the exposure draft of proposed changes to the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (2020) and the National Environmental Standards for Freshwater (2020).

3.         That councillors_________ be delegated authority to approve the content of a submission on behalf of council on the exposure draft of proposed changes to the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (2020) and the National Environmental Standards for Freshwater (2020), and the submission to be signed by the Chair.

4.         That council (make / don’t make) a submission on the Draft National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity – Exposure draft.

5.         That councillors ______ be delegated authority to approve the content of a submission on behalf of council on the Draft National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity – Exposure draft, and the submission to be signed by the Chair.

6.         That a draft of any submission made under resolution 3. or 5. will be circulated to non-elected members of the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party for comment prior to being lodged.

 

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Council makes submissions (either its own and/or a regional council sector submission)

The government is aware of council concerns with the proposals and council’s submission informs government decisions.

Staff time to prepare submissions

2

Council does not make submissions

No staff time taken up with preparing submissions

The government is not aware of councils concerns and therefore no chance of influencing government decisions. 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1.

Considerations

1.         Environmental Impact

The decision will not have a direct impact on the environment. There may be some indirect impact on Northland’s environment, but it will depend on the contact of the submission

2.         Community views

The government proposals are likely to be of interest to communities.  However, the decision to make council submissions does not require public / community consultation.

3.         Māori impact statement

The government proposals are likely to be of interest to Māori.  It is recommended a draft of any submission will be circulated to non-elected members of the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party for comment prior to being lodged. 

4.         Financial implications

There are no financial implications associated with this decision.

5.         Implementation issues

There are no implementation issues associated with this decision

6.         Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because it is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement. (Note recommendation that the views of the non-elected members of the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party on draft submission(s) be sought for comment prior to being lodged)

7.         Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

There are no known legislative compliance or risks associated with this decision.

 

Background | Tuhinga

Exposure draft of proposed changes to the NPS-FM and NES-F (including wetland regulations)

The Ministry for the Environment (MfE) consulted on proposed amendments to wetland provisions in the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPS-FM) and the National Environmental Standards for Freshwater (NES-F) from 1 September to 27 October 2021. Council made a submission.

Following consultation, MfE analysed submissions and prepared a report summarising submissions and providing advice and recommendations to the Minister. Decisions made based on that report enabled drafting of proposed amendments to wetland provisions.

Given the number and complexity of the proposed amendments to the wetland provisions, MfE have provided further context and policy rationale for those amendments.

Read Managing our wetlands: Policy rationale for exposure draft amendments 2022 

Additionally, since the NPS-FM and NES-F were gazetted in August 2020, MfE officials have maintained a record of technical issues and provisions that require clarification. These amendments aim to improve clarity, reduce complexity of drafting, and in some cases correct errors, without fundamentally changing policy.

Read the Overview of technical corrections and clarifications in the NPS-FM exposure draft

MfE have proposed drafting for these amendments and is seeking feedback on whether the drafting is clear, and if there are any unintended consequences arising from the drafting. Feedback opened 31 May 2020 and closes 10 July 2022.

Staff recommend council make a submission. At the time of writing staff had yet to prepare draft submission, and therefore recommend delegating the lodging of a council submission to a small number of councillors (staff have no view as to which councillors – but just that it be a small number for administrative ease).  It is anticipated this can be achieved via email with these councillors.

Councillors should also be aware that the regional council sector is also making a submission.  Council’s submission therefore may not cover the entire range of issues as they may be adequality addressed in the sector submission, and rather focus on issues particularly relevant to Northland (for example the way the NES-F deals with coastal wetlands) and reiterate the points made in council’s  previous submission. 

Exposure draft of the National Policy Statement - Indigenous Biodiversity

Government released the Draft National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity — Exposure draft (draft NPS – IB) on 9 June.  It is open for submissions until 21 July 2022. Staff had not determined whether council should make a submission at the time of writing.  Staff will provide a verbal recommendation at the council meeting.

There will be a sector led submission that staff will input into.

The draft NPS-IB has objectives, policies, and implementation requirements to help protect precious flora and fauna.

More information about the draft NPSIB can be found here.

Public consultation on the previous iteration of the draft NPS-IB took place between November 2019 and January 2020.  Council made a submission which supported the intent but raised major concerns over the complexity, cost implications (for councils, landowners and consent applicants) and implementation generally.

The draft NPS-IB takes into account submissions received during the November 2019 to January 2020 public consultation period.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.6

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Te Mana o Te Wai Funding

From:

Ben Lee, Planning and Policy Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Jonathan Gibbard, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 15 June 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

Council has allocated $250,000 per year ongoing, starting from next financial year (1 July 2022), for implementing Te Mana o Te Wai (as directed by the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management).  The recommendations within this report reflect the advice of Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party (TTMAC) on how this funding should be spent.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Te Mana o Te Wai Funding’ by Ben Lee, Planning and Policy Manager and dated 24 May 2022, be received.

2.         That the allocation of the $250,000 Te Mana o Te Wai funding for 2023/2024, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 is based on the following priorities:

a.         1st priority: Supporting tangata whenua participation in the freshwater planning process.

b.        2nd priority: Developing a mātauranga Māori freshwater framework.

c.         3rd priority:

i.          Implementing the mātauranga Māori freshwater framework, and

ii.         Investigating the use of mechanisms available under the Resource Management Act 1991 to involve tangata whenua in freshwater management (such as using transfer of functions and joint management agreements)

3.      That the allocation of the $250,000 Te Mana o Te Wai funding for 2022/2023 is as follows:

​Activity

22/23

A)  Supporting tangata whenua in the freshwater planning process

$150k

B)  Developing a Freshwater Mātauranga Māori framework​

$100K

C)  Implementing the Mātauranga Māori freshwater framework​

$0

D)  Investigating the use of mechanisms available under the Resource Management Act 1991 to involve tangata whenua in freshwater management (such as using transfer of functions and joint management agreements)

$0

 

4.      That Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party advice is sought early 2023 on the allocation of the 2023/2024 Te Mana o Te Wai funding.

5.      That Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party advice is sought on a scope of work for developing a mātauranga Māori freshwater framework.

6.      That council will approve a scope of work for developing a mātauranga Māori freshwater framework upon receiving advice from Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party.

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Confirm the priorities for the $250,000 Te Mana o Te Wai funding for the next three years.

Provides clear direction to plan for the expenditure of the fund.

Consistent with TTMAC advice.

None

2

Do not confirm the priorities.

None

No direction for staff to plan for expenditure of the fund.

Goes against TTMAC advice.

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1.

Considerations

1.         Environmental Impact

The decision (to identify the priorities for spending) will not have a direct impact on the environment.  However, the priorities recommended will support activities benefiting the environment over time.

2.         Community views

No views, other than TTMAC, have been sought on how the Te Mana o Te Wai funding should be spent.

3.         Māori impact statement

The recommendations are consistent with the advice of TTMAC.  No other Māori views have been sought and nor are they considered necessary.  The views of TTMAC are considered to provide an appropriate level of understanding of Māori views given the nature of the decision.

4.         Financial implications

There are no financial implications.  The decision is about how to spend budgeted funds.

5.         Implementation issues

There are no implementation issues in respect to a decision to support tangata whenua participation in the freshwater planning process (1st priority).  It will help address an issue of potentially underfunding the tangata whenua involvement aspects of the freshwater planning process.

 

The development of a mātauranga Māori freshwater framework (2nd priority) will be led by the Environmental Services group.  Any issues with implementation of the mātauranga Māori freshwater framework (3rd priority) will be considered during its development and when council approves it.  The same applies to investigating the use of mechanisms available under the Resource Management Act 1991 to involve tangata whenua in freshwater management (3rd priority).

 

6.         Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, the recommendations are of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because it is about the allocation of a budget already set in council’s Long-Term Plan and the recommendations reflect the advice of TTMAC.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

 

7.         Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

The establishment of the $250,000 Te Mana o te Wai fund was as a result of the policy direction in the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management.  There is no relevant policy or legislative direction for the specific allocation of the funding.

 

Background/Tuhinga

In 2020 central government released its National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM).

 

It requires freshwater to be managed in a way that gives effect to Te Mana of te Wai[1], including by

·    involving tangata whenua,

·    prioritising the health and wellbeing of water bodies, then the essential needs of people, followed by other uses,

·    enabling the application of mātauranga Māori, to the management of freshwater, and

·    investigating use of transfer of powers, joint management agreements and mana whakahono a rohe.

 

Council has allocated $250,000 a year ongoing starting in the next financial year (starting 1 July 2022) as part of its commitment to implement Te Mana o Te Wai.  The funding is to support tangata whenua in freshwater management. No decisions have been made about how the funding will be allocated, except for advancing $111,000 from next year’s budget to assist the Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group (TWWAG) in their work on the freshwater plan change[2] this current financial year.

Council sought advice from TTMAC on how the Te Mana o Te Wai funding should be allocated (19 May 2022 TTMAC meeting).  The advice was that for the first three years the priorities are:

1st priority – Supporting tangata whenua participation in the freshwater planning process (principally providing funding for TWWAG’s work and supporting tangata whenua participation in the planning process)

2nd priority – Developing a mātauranga Māori freshwater framework, which could include:

§ How mātauranga Māori is used for monitoring progress towards freshwater target attributes states and environmental outcomes in the freshwater plan change

§ Supporting kaitiaki to undertake their own freshwater monitoring mahi

§ Involving tangata whenua in the development of council freshwater monitoring programmes (e.g. wetlands, threatened species, and sediment)

§ Supporting kaitiaki to undertake activities to improve te mnan  o te wai

o    3rd priority:

§ Implementing the mātauranga Māori freshwater framework – allocation of funds to tangata whenua to undertake freshwater mātauranga Māori activities

§ Investigating the transfer of functions, joint management agreements etc.

 

Based on these priorities, the proposed general estimated allocation would be as follows:

 

​Priorities

22/23

23/24

24/25

1.  Supporting tangata whenua in the freshwater planning process* 

$150k

($111k already allocated + additional estimated $39k) 

$50k

$50k

2.  Developing a Freshwater Mātauranga Māori framework​

$100K

$0

$0

3.a.  Implementing the Mātauranga Māori freshwater framework​

$0

$150k

$150k

3.b.  Investigate transfer of functions, JMAs etc

$0

$50k

$50k

*There is already budget for Māori involvement in freshwater water planning i.e. not all being funded out of TMOTW funding.

If council is comfortable with this approach, then the proposed next steps are:

·    Firm up the funding for the first year (22/23) for supporting tangata whenua in the freshwater planning process (the first priority).  This will depend on TWWAG’s 22/23 workplan and the programme for tangata whenua engagement on the plan change (estimate August/September). 

·    Prepare a scope of work for developing the mātauranga Māori freshwater framework​. TTMAC recommended they provide advice to council on the scope of work.  Council would then confirm the scope of work.

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.7

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Tangata Whenua Environmental Monitoring Fund - draft allocation policy

From:

Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement and Jonathan Gibbard, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 22 June 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

Council has a fund of $20,000 a year to support environmental monitoring by tāngata whenua. The fund is intended to support tāngata whenua to undertake their own monitoring, however it is often underutilised and there is limited guidance for staff on how this fund should be allocated. A policy to guide allocation of the fund would clarify this situation for staff and tāngata whenua and help ensure the fund is fully allocated.

 

A draft policy has been developed with advice from the Māori Technical Advisory Group (MTAG) and was endorsed by Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party (TTMAC) at the 19 May working party meeting. It is recommended that the draft policy attached be adopted by council.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Tangata Whenua Environmental Monitoring Fund - draft allocation policy’ by Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist and dated 7 June 2022, be received.

2.         That council adopt the Tāngata Whenua Environmental Monitoring Fund draft allocation policy.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

That council adopt the draft allocation policy.

There is greater clarity on the purpose of the fund (for staff and applicants) and guidance on allocation of the fund. 

None

2

Council does not adopt the draft allocation policy

None

A lack of clarity on the purpose of the fund remains and little guidance for those making allocation decisions

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1

 

 

Considerations

1.         Environmental Impact

The adoption of the policy will have no negative impact on the ability of council to respond to climate change or environmental issues. The policy will better enable tāngata whenua to provide information that will support environmental management by both tāngata whenua and council. 

2.         Community views

There are unlikely to be strong community views on adoption of the allocation policy given the Tāngata Whenua Monitoring Fund is already in place and the allocation policy will assist decision makers ensure the fund is targeted appropriately and fully allocated.

3.         Māori impact statement

Impacts on Māori are likely to be positive due to a clearer policy basis for allocating the monitoring fund. The policy has also been developed with input from MTAG and was endorsed by TTMAC at the 19 May meeting.

4.         Financial implications

There are no known financial implications of adopting the draft allocation policy given the fund is already established.

5.         Implementation issues

No implementation issues are expected given the tāngata whenua monitoring fund is already in place and the allocation policy will assist decision makers ensure the fund is targeted appropriately and fully allocated.

6.         Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, the recommendations are of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because it is about the allocation of a budget already set in council’s Long-Term Plan.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tāngata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

7.         Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

There are no known risk or legislative compliance issues associated with adoption of the policy.

Background/Tuhinga

Council has a fund of $20,000 a year to support environmental monitoring by tāngata whenua. The fund is intended to support tāngata whenua to undertake their own monitoring, however it is often underutilised and there is limited guidance for staff on how this fund should be allocated. A policy to guide allocation of the fund would clarify this situation for staff and tāngata whenua alike.

Staff have worked with MTAG to develop a policy to guide allocation decisions for this fund. The policy will provide clarity as to the scope and purpose of the fund and provide consistency in decision making. The draft allocation policy was endorsed by TTMAC at the 19 May 2022 meeting with a minor amendment to include reference to ‘operational tāngata whenua entity’ in the application criteria. It is recommended that the draft allocation policy attached is adopted by council.   

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Tāngata whenua Environmental Monitoring Fund – Allocation Policy   


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.7

28 June 2022Attachment 1

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.8

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Formal endorsement of submission made into the National Adaptation Plan by the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee

From:

Tom FitzGerald, Climate Change Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience, on 13 June 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

This report provides the final submission into the draft National Adaptation Plan from the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee (the JCCAC). The Submission was drafted by staff from across the four (4) councils and was subject to a short but intensive review and feedback period with elected members and Tiriti partners.

 

Submissions closed with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) on 3 June 2022.

 

There are no existing delegations to the JCCAC with respect to joint submissions.

 

As per council’s Delegation’s Manual (2019), the Executive Leadership Team has delegated authority to make submissions on council’s behalf where timeframes are such that formal council approval cannot be sought prior to their lodgement. This is the case for submissions deemed to be politically significant.

 

The final submission was signed by council’s CEO on behalf of the JCCAC and submitted. It is attached for noting and endorsement.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Formal endorsement of submission made into the National Adaptation Plan by the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee’ by Climate Change Manager and dated 10 June 2022, be received.

2.         That the attached final Submission be formally received and retrospectively approved.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Submission approved

A collaborative regional submission representing the views of the four (4) northern councils is a significant achievement.

Retrospectively approving the submission confirms the strength and integrity of the regional partnership to address the climate crisis. It also positions Te Taitokerau as a leader in collaborative climate governance and serves to shine a light on the unique challenges we face.

None.

2

Submission not approved

None.

The submission has already been received by the Ministry for the Environment. If council were to not approve, the submission would have to be requested to be formally withdrawn.

As our partner councils and Tiriti partners did not lodge their own submissions, they are relying on council approval to ensure their voices are heard. Not approving would have significant ramifications on the strength and integrity of our partnership and weaken the implementation of climate response actions.

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1.

 

Considerations

1.         Environmental Impact

This decision to approve this submission will have no direct impact on the environment.

However, a joint submission from Te Taitokerau councils provides greater opportunity to influence the direction and final content of New Zealand’s first ever National Adaptation Plan, thereby allowing improved likelihood of good adaptation outcomes in our region and for our communities.

2.         Community views

The call for public submissions into the National Adaptation Plan was open from late April to 3 June 2022. Every New Zealander and every organisation had a chance to provide their own submission. Whilst the consultation period could have been longer, it is unknown how many submissions were received by the Ministry for the Environment.

 

No specific consultation on the National Adaptation Plan has been undertaken in Northland.

There will be significant opportunities for engagement with local communities as each of our partner District Councils undertakes their own site-specific climate adaptation plans.

3.         Māori impact statement

The draft submission was consulted on directly with members of the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party in late May 2022. Iwi/hapū representatives on the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee were also given specific opportunity provide guidance, feedback and input into the submission and formally endorsed the draft submission at their meeting of 30 May 2022.

No specific consultation on the National Adaptation Plan has been undertaken with Māori in Northland. The Ministry for the Environment conducted five (5) online workshops during the consultation period specifically with and for Māori. A document setting out an indigenous worldview framework for the National Adaptation Plan (the Rauora Framework) accompanied the consultation package. This Framework had been developed by the Iwi Chairs Forum.

There will be significant and specific opportunities for meaningful engagement with iwi, hapū and whanau as each of our partner District Councils undertakes their own location-specific climate adaptation plans. The Te Taitokerau Climate Adaptation Strategy has Māori values at its core and seeks to embed them in council processes. Amongst other things, this will include opportunities for self-directed adaptation by iwi and hapū at scale.

4.         Financial implications

The final submission (and indeed submissions from many of our local government colleagues) highlight the vagaries of financing significant, far-reaching challenges around adaptation – particularly the criticality of central government support.

There are no direct financial implications.

5.         Implementation issues

This decision provides no additional implementation issues.

 

6.         Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy and no additional consultation or engagement is deemed necessary.  

7.         Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

 It is anticipated that the implementation of the National Adaptation Plan will have significant bearing on the way council operates. However, at this stage the architecture of how actions identified in this Plan filter down to a regional scale are unknown. These challenges and opportunities are outlined in our submission.

There are no direct risks posed by the decision to approve this submission retrospectively.

A decision to NOT retrospectively approve this submission (Option 2 above) poses unknown reputational risks to council, particularly with regard to the nature and successful operation of the collaborative approach to climate change adaptation in Te Taitokerau.

Background/Tuhinga

The Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019 introduced a number of new mechanisms to help us address the climate crisis. These include the introduction of the new Climate Commission, and the requirements for a national Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) and a National Adaptation Plan (NAP). The final ERP was released in full on 16 May 2022.

 

A draft NAP was released for public consultation on 27 April 2022.

 

The NAP will have significant bearing and influence the way we can enable on-ground adaptation and deals with significant issues like roles and responsibilities, funding, and managed retreat.

Staff prepared a detailed submission that represents the key region-wide issues and opportunities with the proposed NAP.

 

The submission represents the views of members of the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee. Each member council has undertaken their own internal consultation and approval process – including canvassing the views of relevant staff, Tiriti partners and elected members.

The final submission is attached.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Submission into the draft National Adaptation Plan by the Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee   


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.8

28 June 2022Attachment 1

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 8.1

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Chair's Report to Council

From:

Penny Smart, Chair

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Penny Smart, Chair, on

 

Purpose of Report

This report is to receive information from the Chair on meetings/events attended, and correspondence sent for the month of May 2022.

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Chair's Report to Council’ by Penny Smart, Chair and dated 14 June 2022, be received.

 

Meetings/events attended

During this period, I attended the following meetings/events/functions:

·        Regional Sector Meeting

·        Big Fish filming at Kaipara Service Centre

·        Farewell event for Fish and Game Regional Manager

·        LGNZ Reforms updates webinars

·        Meeting with Northland Rescue Helicopters representative

·        Baylys Beach AGM

·        3 Waters meeting with Minister for Local Government

·        NZAGRC State of science webinar

·        Northland Mayoral Forum

Correspondence

During May 2022 I sent out the following correspondence:

Date

Addressed To

Subject

03.05.2022

Eight successful Tertiary Students who live in and/or whakapapa to Te Taitokerau

Tū I te ora Scholarship

03.05.2022

Future for Local Government Review Panel

Future for Local Government Review – follow up

06.05.2022

Chairperson, Environment Committee

Chairperson, Primary Production Committee

NRC response to the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment Space invaders report: A review of how NZ manages wees that threaten native ecosystems

18.05.2022

Minister of Forestry, Parliament, Wellington

Sediment and Forestry Issues in Northland

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 8.2

28 June 2022

 

TITLE:

Chief Executive’s Report to Council

From:

Malcolm Nicolson, Tumuaki - Chief Executive Officer

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Malcolm Nicolson, Tumuaki - Chief Executive Officer, on

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Chief Executive’s Report to Council’ by Malcolm Nicolson, Tumuaki - Chief Executive Officer and dated 30 May 2022, be received.

 

8.2.1   Highlights

Education Days

A dune lake education day was held at Rotokawau with the help from Enviroschools, Biosecurity, Land Management, Te Uri o Hau and the Taurua whānau. 60 students from both Poutō primary and Te Kopuru school learnt about tuna and fish, biosecurity and kākahi (freshwater mussels). The inclusion of kākahi into this event was important due their presence in the lake and the significance of kākahi to Māori history in the area.

 

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Northland Regional Council Environmental Awards – Kiwi Coast ‘Outstanding Group or Project Award’

A new addition to council’s environmental awards this year, the award aims to recognise the outstanding achievements of Northland groups and projects who have proven their commitment to restoring the health of their local native forests and wildlife, including kiwi.  The winner of the inaugural award was Bay Bush Action Project for a truly outstanding, community led project with proven results in forest health regeneration and steadily increasing kiwi populations        


 

 

Kiwi Coast outstanding group or project award winners Bush Bay Action.

 

8.2.2   CEO’s Office

Current Legal Proceedings

Department

Description

Status

Consent decision appeal

Two separate consent applications for replacement and new consents relating to a proposed expansion of, Doug’s Opua Boat Yard in Walls Bay, Ōpua

Court has advised that a hearing is required for these appeals.  The council evidence to be with the Court by 15 June 2022.

Consent decision appeal

Irrigation of avocado orchards and horticulture crops

Court Hearing was held over a two week period from Monday 9 May to Friday 20 May 2022, with an additional day on Wednesday 22 May 2022.  The Hearing was not closed and is adjourned until the end of June.  The Court will undertake a site visit in mid June.

 

A write-off of $12,391.74  (excluding GST) was approved from the account of Otehei Bay Holdings Limited following the direction from the District Court to reach a settlement on unpaid costs sought by council in relation to the processing of a consent application originally made the company.

 

8.2.3   CORPORATE SERVICES

Fraud Declaration

I am not aware of any fraud nor am I investigating any incidence or suspected incidence of fraud at this time.

Enterprise System Update

 

8.2.4   regulatory services

Consents in Process

During May 2022, a total of 119 Decisions were issued.  These decisions comprised:

Ÿ Moorings

2

 

 

Ÿ Coastal Permits

27

 

 

Ÿ Land Discharge Permits

10

 

 

Ÿ Water Discharge Permits

4

 

 

Ÿ Land Use Consents

49

 

 

Ÿ Water Permits

20

 

 

Ÿ Bore Consents

7

 

 

The processing timeframes for the May 2022 consents ranged from:

Ÿ 224 to 2 calendar days, with the median time being 43 days;

Ÿ 42 to 2 working days, with the median time being 22 days.

Forty-eight applications were received in May 2022.

Of the 187 applications in progress at the end of May 2022:

Ÿ 29 were received more than 12 months ago;

Reasons for being more than 12 months old:

-    Awaiting additional information (including CIAs)

12

-    Consultation with affected parties/stakeholders

4

-    On-hold pending new rules becoming operative

6

-    Other

7

Ÿ 20 were received between 6 and 12 months ago (most awaiting further information from the applicant);

Ÿ 138 less than 6 months.

Appointment of Hearing Commissioners

No commissioners were appointed in May 2022.

Consents Decisions and Progress on Notified Applications in Process, Objections and Appeals

The current level of notified application processing activities at the end of May 2022 is (by number):

Ÿ Applications Publicly/Limited Notified During Previous Month

1

Ÿ Progress on Applications Previously Notified

4

Ÿ Hearings and Decisions

0

Ÿ Appeals/Objections

2

 

COMPLIANCE MONITORING

The results of compliance monitoring for the period 1 – 31 May 2022 (and year-to-date figures) are summarised in the following table and discussed below.

Classification

Total

Full compliance

Low risk non-compliance

Moderate non-compliance

Significant non-compliance

Not exercised during period

Air Discharge

34

28

4

0

0

2

Bore Consent

9

8

1

0

0

0

Coastal Discharge

25

18

5

2

0

0

Coastal Permit

131

64

23

30

7

7

Land Discharge

179

81

41

10

1

46

Land Use Consent

154

85

1

0

0

68

Water Discharge

116

78

17

9

2

10

Water Permit

95

60

2

0

0

33

Water Take

232

136

62

8

0

26

Total

975

558

156

59

10

192

Percentage

 

57.2%

16.0%

6.1%

1.0%

19.7%

Year to date

6477

4482

816

427

77

675

Percentage

 

69.2%

12.6%

6.6%

1.2%

10.4%

Coastal

Compliance reports following monitoring inspections for all marine farms were provided to consent holders. Follow-up enforcement action on marine farms will now be prioritised where moderate to significant non-compliances were recorded.  Final coastal structure inspections for the Far North were undertaken and reporting on coastal permit inspections to consent holders was ongoing.

Water, Waste, Air and Land Use (WWALU) Compliance Monitoring

Ÿ Contaminated Land Management

Nine incidents involving the discharge of hazardous substances and 17 enquiries regarding contaminated land were received and responded to.  320kg of hazardous waste was disposed of at the amnesty day, and 5 sites were added to the Selected Land-Use Register.

·   Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants 

WWTP/Consent Status  

Issues (June 2022)  

Enforcement Action/Response   

Far North District  

Ahipara  

Expires 2033  

Ongoing non-compliance with bacteriological consent limits  

Under AN   

FNDC investigating land disposal options; UV system to be installed in 2022/2023 to reduce bacteriological concentrations  

Hihi  

Expires 30 November 2022  

No recent issues; replacement consent application yet to be received  

None currently  

Kāeo  

Expires 31 October 2022  

No recent issues; replacement consent application yet to be received  

None currently  

Kaikohe  

Expired 30 November 2021; Replacement consent application in process  

Intermittent non-compliances with ADW flow, ammonia & bacteriological consent limits.  

System overdue for de-sludging  

None currently  

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent  

Kaitaia  

Expired 30 November 2021; Replacement consent application in process

No recent issues; FNDC discussing with iwi/hapu potential consent conditions  

Under AN (reticulation overflows)  

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent  

Kawakawa  

Expires 2036  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Kerikeri  

Expires 2036  

No obvious issues from new plant (commissioned in December 2020)  

  

Under AN   

Kohukohu  

Expired 2016; Replacement consent application on hold  

Occasional issues with bacteriological conditions of consent; CIA still awaited before public notification occurs 

None currently  

Opononi & Ōmāpere  

Expired 2019; Replacement consent application publicly notified and on hold  

Non-compliances with bacteriological consent limits; desludging overdue; still intended to jointly process with Kohukohu replacement consent application  

Under AN  

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent; desludging to be undertaken 

Paihia  

Expires 2034  

Plant upgraded 2019; alkalinity issues preventing optimal ammonia treatment  

None currently   

Alkalinity improvement project still in progress  

Rangiputa  

Expires 2032  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Rāwene  

Expires 2023  

System overdue for de-sludging  

Infringement notices issued in February 2022 in relation to a discharge from the reticulation  

Russell  

Expires 2024  

Occasional non-compliances with E. coli consent limit post UV  

Under AN  

Infringement notices issued January 2022  

Taipā  

Expires 2029  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Whatuwhiwhi  

Expires 2025  

Elevated TSS levels (consent limit may be unnecessarily restrictive)  

FNDC to seek consent variation to address TSS levels – however this is not a priority  

Whangarei District  

Hikurangi  

Expires 2025  

Intermittent issues with plant performance  

None currently  

Plant performance being reviewed to identify improvements  

Ngunguru  

Expires 2035  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Ōākura  

Expires 2025  

Occasional spikes in E. coli  

None currently  

Portland  

Expires 2024  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Ruakākā  

Expires 2046  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Tutukaka  

Expires 2024  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Waiōtira  

Expires 2030  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Waipū   

Expires 2030  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Whāngārei City  

Expired 30 April 2022; Replacement consent application in process

Odour issues; replacement consent application received and will be publicly notified shortly  

Abatement notice issued requiring actions to be implemented to mitigate the odour emanating from the treatment plant 

Kaipara District  

Dargaville  

Expires 30 June 2022: Replacement consent application in process  

Non-compliances with WQ discharge volume consent limits, replacement consent application received

Under AN  

Glinks Gully  

Expires 2024  

No recent issues  

None currently  

Kaiwaka  

Expires 31 October 2022  

No recent issues; replacement consent application yet to be received   

None currently  

Mangawhai  

Expires 2042  

Odour complaints and occasional exceedances of TDS consent limit  

Under AN  

 

Maungaturoto  

Expires 2032  

Intermittent non-compliances, generally due to high rainfall  

Under AN  

Te Kopuru  

Expires 2044  

Intermittent minor non-compliances  

Second aerator installed 2020 

Environmental Incidents

There were no environmental incidents reported in May which resulted in a significant environmental impact.

ENFORCEMENT

Abatement Notices, Infringement Notices and Formal Warnings

The following is a summary of the abatement and infringement notices issued:

Action Type

Number

Abatement Notice

14

Infringement Notice

3

Other Enforcement

Ÿ Open burning on industrial/trade property – Whangārei

Charges were laid in the Whangārei District Court on 27 November 2020 against an individual for open burning on industrial/trade premises; the burnt items also included prohibited items. Witnesses from both sides gave evidence in court on 25 May 2022. Then the next step is to file submissions by June 2022. The set date for the decision to be released is 4 July 2022 at 10am.

Ÿ Farm dairy effluent – Parapara

Charges were laid in the Kaitaia District Court on 6 May 2021 against a farm owner for offences which occurred in August 2020. There are four charges against the farm owner. According to the doctors’ reports confirming that the farm owner has mental health issues, the judge concluded the farm owner is to be discharged under section 25(1)(d) of the Criminal Procedure (Mentally Impaired Persons) Act. The case is concluded with no order for costs to the NRC.

·   Vessel occupying CMA & removal of asbestos from CMA – Town Basin, Whangārei

An enforcement order was applied for on 23 November 2021 against an individual for occupying the coastal marine with a boat without consent, and for reimbursement of costs associated with work to remove and dispose of cladding material containing asbestos that had been deposited within the coastal marine area. A settlement on these matters was reached and has been executed. 

·   Earthworks & vegetation clearance within a wetland – Teal Bay

Charges were laid in the Whangarei District Court on 7 December 2021 against four parties for offences that occurred in December 2020. The offences relate to unconsented earthworks within wetland. NRC will put a proposal to the defendants’ lawyers for negotiation in charges.

 

8.2.5   ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

land management

Sustainable Hill Country and Regional Priorities

Milestones

Status

Farm Environment Plans (FEPs)

A change in process and reporting template from Farm Environment Plans to Soil Conservation Plans resulted in a slow start to the completion of plans. Consequently, by the middle of the year we had underdelivered on the number of plans/hectares covered leaving us in a position of playing catchup.  A late flurry of completed plans (particularly large farms) meant we have now met the hectare target by completing 85 plans covering 27,864ha (100% of hectare target achieved). 

Poplar and Willow nursery

Objective

Status

Harvest

Harvest is underway with delivery scheduled for later this month. We have orders for 8,440 subsidised poplar and willow trees, exceeding our 7000 target (120% of target achieved).  We have additional demand for 1009 trees for non-erosion control purposes such as shelter belts and livestock shade.  These trees will be supplied at full price if there is stock remaining after the subsidised tree orders for soil conservation purposes have been satisfied.

 

Whangārei urban awa project

Key updates for this project:

·   The deed variation to include the Otaika catchment and extend the timeframe until January 2024 has been signed by both parties.

·   The Year 3 annual work plan and Year 2 Quarter 3 report have been accepted by MFE.

·   Planting projects continue to lag behind the projected KPI.  There are currently only three projects approved for this planting season.  The extension of the project into the Otaika catchment will hopefully improve this.

·   The recruitment process to replace the previous Project Manager has been completed, with an internal applicant successful.   Having a full-time team member focusing on this project again will help extend the outreach to landowners and achieve KPI’s.

 

biodiversity

Māori Partnerships

The Roto Tapokapoka Tūhono Wānanga (Dune Lakes Partnerships Wānanga) was held at Lake Waikare, in the Te Roroa rohe of Kai Iwi Lakes.  This was considered a landmark wānanga, a first in gathering around 40 kaitiaki from 6 different hapū and iwi together to connect, build relationships and develop a vision for our dune lake taonga.  With the FIF Dune Lakes Project is in its final year, we explored how hapū and iwi would like to work with NRC to look after dune lakes and what a partnership might look like moving forward.  Each region shared their aspirations and expectations while learning practical monitoring skills and sharing understandings about the ecology and cultural significance of ngā roto in Te Tai Tokerau.   Feedback has been very positive from each of the iwi/hapū that came. 

 

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Aquatic weed and pest fish control

Staff removed 107 invasive tench (Tinca tinca) from Lake Kapoai, Te Koporu.  Adult tench had a mean length of 402mm and a mean weight of 0.85kg. A wider range of net mesh sizes were used compared to previous attempts and this was successful in targeting adult tench, providing insight into the size range of tench in the lake.

CoastCare

Biodiversity staff held a field trip with Renew School year science 13 students, which followed a pre visit lesson earlier in the week to introduce dune ecology, function and monitoring methods.  We started with a 5-minute bird count, checked lizard shelters and then measured the four vegetations transects set up last year.  The school has been set up as a site admin on the coastal monitoring database and will be entering the vegetation data collected.

 

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Dune monitoring with Renew School: checking lizard shelters, vegetation monitoring and five-minute bird count

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Wetlands

Council staff continue to work with MWLR, as part of an Envirolink funded project, to identify what enhancements would be required to councils current wetland monitoring programme to meet the requirements of the NPS-FM.

Biodiversity staff are part of the Kaimaumau Ecosystem Technical Advisory Group (TAG) advising a multi-agency Governance Group on recovery of the wetland after a major fire swept through the area over summer.   A site visit was made with mana whenua, Department of Conservation, and ecologists from the TAG considering issues around weed spread, drains, threatened species management and restoration opportunities

 

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Motutangi drain running through the Kaimaumau Wetland with firebreak and weedy wattle regeneration.

 

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Regeneration of native species in a heavily burnt area of manuka peat bog.

 

 

 

Natural resources

Coastal/Water Quality Operations

·   Consultation with tangata whenua on new water quality State of the Environment sampling sites is being undertaken. 

·   Quarterly litter surveys were undertaken at Hātea and Onerahi sites (results pending).  An additional four sites were also included (Church Bay, Pacific Bay, Matapōuri and Sandy Bay), all of which returned low yields of plastic pollution.

·   All freshwater continuous water quality monitoring stations have been installed as per the recent monitoring network review and LTP budget.  These stations collect data every 15 minutes, providing a wealth of information on the water quality of the site.  

Natural Resources Science

Air quality and carbon emission

·   Comparison of council’s CO2-e (carbon dioxide equivalent) monthly emissions between 2021 and 2022 is presented in the graph below. The council’s monthly carbon emission in 2022 recorded lower than 2021 emission.  The decreased emission in 2022 is attributed to the current COVID-19 restrictions.  The graph is based on live data and therefore the figures for the last few months are subject to change.

 

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Freshwater quality

·   The contract for procuring a LiDAR based high resolution digital river network (DRN) model with the Water Technology NZ Ltd is progressing well.  The Rivers team is providing technical assistance.

·   The draft GIS layers for the Northern Wairoa catchment has been reviewed and the deliverables are due by mid-June 2022.

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An example snapshot of DRN catchments (dark grey lines) with river lines at 2ha (dark blue), and 0.2ha (light blue) scales in Tangiterōria. Dark brown dots indicate start and end points of each river segment. The yellow jagged lines are currently available coarser catchments (i.e. NIWA river network model).

 

·   A river water quality workshop was presented by the Freshwater and Monitoring team to the Year 11 students from Whangārei Boys High School in the beginning of May, which received positive feedback from the school.

·   Works related to the development of a NEMS (National Environmental and Monitoring Standards) protocol for sampling and processing planktonic cyanobacteria are ongoing. This NEMS protocol will mainly focus on lakes to assist in implementing the NPS-FM cyanobacteria attributes. The final draft of this NEMS protocol is currently being reviewed by the NEMS working group.

Natural Resources Data

·   Data automation project for processing continuous data:

The contract for services for Phase 1 “feasibility and discovery” of the project is being finalised with Orbica Limited. This initial phase will involve regular workshops and meetings with Orbica Limited to define the needs, complete a gap analysis at NRC and understand the current data processing and handling methods. The contract for services for Phase 2 “Planning, Research & Development” will be finalised by the end of June 2022.

·   The data team has contracted a consultant from HyQuest Solutions to help us with the final phases of the implementation of the KiEco biological database and historical data import.

Hydrology

Rainfall

·   May 2022 was drier than normal.

·   Overall autumn was a classic La Niña rainfall distribution across the region, with wetter than normal conditions on the East and dry to the North and the West.

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Rivers

·    River flows generally reflect rainfall distribution across the region. The Kaihū and the Awanui Rivers are quite low for this time of year (note though, that flows are categorised relative to time of year, so flows are not as low as typical summer conditions; there are no water resourcing concerns).

·    Most rivers on the east recorded “Normal” or “Above Normal” flows.

 

Groundwater

Groundwater levels continue to be categorised as “Normal” to “Above Normal”

 

POLICY AND PLANNING

Review of the Regional Policy Statement

Work is underway on the 5 yearly review of the RPS required under section 35 of the RMA.  MTAG has selected a consultant to assist them in providing input to the review from a tangata whenua perspective and the district councils have had an initial briefing on the process.  The project will be completed by the end of the year ready for consideration when the new council is convened and available for decision making.

Proposed Regional Plan Appeals

Staff continue to work towards resolving the remaining appeals on a range of topics. Key points arising since the last report are:

·   Council is due to report progress to the Court on topics 1 (coastal activities), 6 (damming and diverting water and land drainage), 10 (infrastructure, energy, and natural hazards) and 1A (vehicles on beaches) by 30 June.  If appeals remain unresolved after 30 June, council staff will confer with parties and request that these matters be set down for a hearing.  

·   In January’s CEO report staff advised that the Environment Court approved the process for mapping Outstanding Natural Landscapes in the Coastal Marine Area. Part of this process was to map cultural landscapes of significance to Tangata Whenua with support of a consultant with expertise in engagement with Tangata Whenua and Landscape Architecture. Unfortunately, staff were not successful in securing the required expertise within the allocated budget.  At the time of writing, a workshop with council was scheduled for 21 June to discuss the next steps for councils before seeking direction from the Environment Court on how to proceed.

Freshwater Plan Change

Staff gave a presentation to key stakeholders (e.g., District Councils, Northland DHB, Fish and Game, Doc, Forest & Bird) on our freshwater plan change process, freshwater framework, and the opportunity for these parties to engage at this point in the freshwater plan change process.

Staff also met with Auckland Regional Council staff to discuss our respective freshwater plan change processes, particularly our alignment of planning provisions in the Kaipara catchment.

The NIWA mitigation scenario and costing information will be presented to the next Primary Sector Liaison Group meeting (21 June).

A meeting has been scheduled for 15 July with the ‘Wai Māori Group’ - a subgroup of the iwi members of ILGACE (Iwi and Local Government Chief Executives).

Staff will be presenting to the executive management team of Te Rūnanga-A-Iwi O Ngāpuhi on 22 June.

TTMAC approved the ‘Stage 1’ report prepared by the Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group (TWWAG) at their 9 June meeting.  The Stage 1 report sets out freshwater matauranga Māori to set the foundation for TWWAGs development of recommended freshwater planning provisions.

 

8.2.6   BIOSECURITY

WILD ANIMAL CONTROL

Feral deer

·    Deer farm escape:  A lone deer escape reported from a Paparoa deer farm was resolved  with the farmer and council working together to recapture a young stag.  However, continued surveillance with game cameras (left in situ after the recapture), have identified a further escapee – a red hind still on the outside of the fence.  Council staff are continuing to work with the farmer to recapture the escapee.


A second deer identified by game camera
still outside the fence of the Paparoa deer farm.

·    Reported fallow deer release:  Extensive enquiries into the report of 20 fallow deer released at the Tangihua Range have produced no evidence to support the report after several days of investigation.  The release information came from word of mouth that the liberation occurred rather than an actual sighting of the animals.  Regardless of this, a leaflet drop to residents has been undertaken around the location.  

·    Kaitāia fallow deer sighting:  A reported fallow deer sighting near Kaitāia last month is being followed up by the deer response contractor using thermal surveillance, tracker dogs and ground hunting.  There are historic reports going back to 2020 of the fallow deer sightings in the area so it appears there is a small herd there.  There are 19 landowners who have given permission to respond in the vicinity.  

Feral pigs

There has been a small number of enquiries in relation to access to council pig traps as winter sets in and pig damage to pasture and sightings increase.

FRESHWATER PESTS

·    Grass carp removal, Lake Swan:  A grass carp removal operation at Lake Swan on the Poutō Peninsula involved setting 32 gill nets over two days and captured 11 grass carp.

·    Tench removal, Lake Kapoai:  A joint Biosecurity-Biodiversity operation to remove tench from Lake Kapoai on the Poutō Peninsula was conducted over 2½ days and removed 117 tench.

Tench removal, Lake Kapoai, Te Kōpuru; (clockwise from top left): 
Setting gill nets, field examination of removed tench, measuring tench, Lake Kapoai, some of the 117 removed fish.

KAURI PROTECTION

Waitangi marae wānanga

A council kauri protection officer arranged a wānanga for approximately 20 rangatahi at Waitangi marae.  Biosecurity officers presented topics including kauri protection, pest animals, pest plants, Predator Free 2050 and marine biosecurity.  The young people were very engaged and the possibility for extending this to a day of practical application was discussed for further opportunities such as this in the future.

Waitangi Treaty Ground hygiene stations

Discussions are underway with Waitangi Treaty Ground staff and the Ministry for Primary Industries regarding installation of hygiene stations at the grounds and advocacy for kauri protection. 

PARTNERSHIPS

Northland Regional Council – Kiwi Coast partnership

·    Annual Regional Pest Control Workshop:  For the first time the wānanga was an online workshop (or “Zui”).  The online workshop was well received with 176 people registered from Northland, wider New Zealand and even Australia, Europe, and USA!  Topics covered were based on three themes of “Northland Research and Results”, ‘Perspectives and Projects’, and “Trappers and Tools”.  The online workshop was very well received by participants and received a lot of unsolicited positive feedback which is best summed up as “brilliant job”.

Kiwi Link High Value Area

·    Pest control results 2021:  Pest control results for 2021 have been collated with a grand total of 9,038 pest removed during the year.  Over half the total pest (4,598) were possums, of which over half (2,830) were trapped by the Owhiwa Landcare and Whareora Landcare groups.  In the five years the Kiwi Link project has been running a total of 36,487 pests have been removed from the project area. 

Whangārei Heads High Value Area

·    Annual kiwi call count:  The annual kiwi count is well under way with keen counters at most of the 20 sites throughout the Whangārei Heads area counting kiwi calls and working out approximate kiwi locations.  The call counting period started well with a good week of calm weather, but the wind, rain, and surf noise (and busy lives) are making things tricky for those trying to finish their four nights counting. 

Tutukaka High Value Area

·    Predator control:  Whilst possum catches have generally decreased since January, the high value area’s total catch for2020-2021 is 1,026.

·    Biodiversity – uncommon species:   A special kākā sighting was made in Sandy Bay in mid-May (Figure 2.), in an area where they have not been seen before.  It is hoped that these sightings are an indicator of the habitat improvements being achieved.

 

 A special kaka sighting in Sandy Bay.
 
 

 

Tānekaha Community Pest Control Area

A scheduled transmitter change for Ellis the kiwi in the Tānekaha Community Pest Control Area provided the opportunity for kiwi liaison with Ngāti Hau.

 

 

 A Ngāti hau member with Ellis the kiwi
 at his transmitter change.

PREDATOR FREE

Predator Free Whangārei

·    Project area activities:  The project has been busy with continuous servicing of traps and bait stations in Working Block 1 and surrounding areas.  Both possums and kiwi are being detected by trail cameras in the project area.

Whangārei Heads PF2050 project trail camera detections since August 2021 of possums (left - red) and kiwi (right – green).

 

MARINE BIOSECURITY

Hull surveillance

In the past month, divers surveyed 372 vessels as part of the hull surveillance programme with an additional 20 vessels surveyed by kaitiaki using a pole camera.  Most vessels surveyed were based in berths at either Marsden Cove Marina or Ōpua Marina.  There was 18 incidents of Sabella spallanzanii (Mediterranean fanworm), two incidents of Styela clava (clubbed tunicate) and 58 incidents of Eudistoma elongatum (Australian droplet tunicate) found on vessel hulls.  Eudistoma elongatum were present in small buds which is typical for this time of year because of colder water temperatures.  Most incidents where S. spallanzanii was found located on vessels were determined to be local recruitment and were removed by divers.  However, one detection was the result of a vessel moving when it was unclean and arriving infected with Sabella- the owner was subsequently directed to haul and clean and this was undertaken the following day at the owner’s cost.  In addition, there were two incidents of Clavelina lepadiformis (lightbulb ascidian) at Marsden Cove Marina where this species is known to be present.

Table 1:  Hull Surveillance Programme Results to 9 June 2022

Hull Surveillance Programme Results

Total this period

Total
YTD

Pathways Plan Compliance if Moving*

 

     

Number of vessels surveyed this period    

392

1999

% Pathways Plan Compliance if Moving (all vessels) *  

53.1

52.5

Vessels found with Marine Pests    

 

   

Sabella spallanzanii (fanworm)    

18

59

Styela clava (clubbed tunicate)    

2

47

Undaria pinnatifida (Japanese kelp)    

0

0

Eudistoma elongatum (Australian droplet tunicate)   

58

86

Pyura doppelgangera (sea squirt)    

0

0

* This is the percentage of vessels surveyed that complied with the acceptable level of ‘light fouling’ as defined in the Marine Pathway Plan. Note: actual compliance is higher given not all these vessels will move from one designated place to another.

Hutchwilco Boat Show

Council marine biosecurity staff attended the Hutchwilco Boat Show in Auckland alongside colleagues from the Top of the North Marine Biosecurity Partnership (DOC, MPI, Auckland Council, Gisborne District Council, and Bay of Plenty, Waikato, and Hawkes Bay regional councils).  This event provides an excellent opportunity to engage with boaties from all regions about the importance of keeping vessels clean and communicate important, up to date information about current marine biosecurity issues.

Top of the North staff explaining identification tips for
 marine pests to visitors at the Hutchwilco Boat Show

Student Seminars  

Marine biosecurity staff have continued engagement with both the Bay of Islands College and NorthTec students studying management of environmental and biodiversity issues.  The Papa Taiao class at Bay of Islands College aims to have a marine biosecurity focus on their upcoming assessment, using Mediterranean fanworm in Ōpua as a case study.  Students will use eDNA sampling to delimit the current population of this pest thus adding a valuable element to council’s ongoing efforts.  NorthTec students will also take a more analytical approach to marine biosecurity by working with staff to assess gaps and challenges faced by those working in Biosecurity in New Zealand.

Top of the North Webinar Series

Council marine biosecurity staff, along with other council representatives from the Top of the North (TON) partnership, presented a webinar about marine pests in the Top of North region.  The webinar attracted more than 40 participants from all over New Zealand who were engaged and encouraged about the progress the TON collaboration has made in recent years.  The webinar series (jointly coordinated by TON and the Top of the South partnerships) has been running for most of the year, attracting hundreds of viewers.  The series has provided accurate and accessible information to boat owners, regulators, treaty partners and important stakeholders about marine biosecurity issues and the progress Aotearoa has made in this space.   

PEST PLANTS

Eradication Plants

·    Batwing passionflower:  The Kamo bush blocks grid search and control rounds are nearly complete and are on track for completion in early June. 

·    Spartina:  A drone survey of inlet in the Whangārei and Kaipara Harbours has been conducted to identify new infestation areas.  Results of the survey will be available in June.

Progressive containment plants

The resumption of fieldworks has allowed a much-needed catchup on inspections that had fallen behind schedule.

·    Mile a minute:  Five reports generated by a recent mailout at Bayleys Beach were followed up with a further 16 new infestation sites identified in the extended survey area. 

·    Manchurian wild rice:  The second round of Manchurian wild rice control is 95% complete and are on track for completion by mid-June.  The quarterly report to the Ministry for Primary Industries has also been completed.

·    Manchurian wild rice infestation – Matakohe forestry block:
An infestation of wild rice was found in a forestry block in Matakohe early in the new year.  The infestation has been treated twice with pleasing results.  

Treatment of a Matakohe forestry block Manchurian wild rice infestation
is showing good results.

Sustained control plants

Staff continue to work through the backlog of sustained control pest plant species requests that built up whilst Covid-19 restrictions impacted on delivery of this work.  A total of 13 notices of direction were in different stages of enforcement during the month.

 

8.2.7   GOVERNANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

MĀORI ENGAGEMENT

Te Whāriki Core Cultural Competency Programme

As an ongoing commitment to develop staff and council cultural competency a Level 1 Te Whariki workshop was facilitated by the Kaiarahi Kaupapa Maori for new council staff at Terenga Paraoa Marae on May 16, 2022. 

Facilitators David Tapine presenting importance of te reo Māori me ōna waiata o Te Taitokerau.

Te Tiriti Health Check

This work is progressing well for recommendations to be provided to council by August 2022.  This will be conducted in Partnership with TTMAC to guide and advise the process alongside independent contractors as noted below:

Independent contractors Paul Beverley, Buddle Findlay and Tai Ahu, Whaia Legal have been engaged to work at Governance, Executive Leadership Team and TTMAC with leadership in the process provided by the tangata whenua caucus of TTMAC. 

A full staff survey is being worked on and due to go live shortly aligned with the Te Arawhiti framework and its recommendations.

Analysis and recommendations will be provided by independent contractors focused on areas of development as identified by TTMAC which include Governance, Relationships with Maori, service design and delivery.

Kete of resources developed and shared end May with iwi, hapū and promoted via appropriate communications platforms.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Investment and Growth Reserve – Projects Report

Project

Update

Future developments/ reporting

REL

Received draft repayment proposal. Made changes following council workshop and discussion with lawyers and provided revision back to Maher Jammal.

Waiting for response from Jammal.

Hundertwasser Art Centre with Wairau Māori Art Gallery

Received final project costings and marketing report as per funding agreement.

Completed.

Other Work Undertaken

Ÿ Water storage – Council workshops held to present investment options of the Kaipara and Mid-North water storahe schemes being developed by the Te Tai Tokerau Water Trust.  Multiple discussions were held in preparation for this with members of the Trust and Tupu Tonu.

Ÿ Walking and Cycling – Led meeting of key stakeholders (district councils, Waka Kotahi, DoC, WAC, Bike Northland, Te Araroa Northland Trust, etc) on implementation of the Strategy.

Ÿ Digital – Provided briefing to the Northland Mayoral Forum on various digital-related actions including information for the hope-to-soon-be-arranged meeting with the Minister.

Ÿ Land Use Geospatial Layer Project – RFP was published on GETS on 17 May, and answers to questions provided.  Tender closes Monday 13 June. 

Ÿ TTMAC – Assisted with organising an update on economic development to be provided to TTMAC by Northland Inc members.

Ÿ CLUES scenarios and costings – Continued working with the Policy and Planning Team on scenario costings and additional scenario options.

ONLINE CHANNELS

Most popular content on Facebook:  Facebook post of congratulations for our Marketing and Engagement Manager, Natasha Stubbing. Co-winning the Taituarā — Local Government Professionals Aotearoa Emerging Leader Award (26 May 2022). Reaching 4,434 customers with engagement of 808.

*Engaged – number of people who ‘reacted’, commented, or shared the post

Key Performance Indicators 

Jan-22 

Feb-22 

Mar-22 

Apl-22 

May-22 

WEB 

 

 

 

 

 

# Visits to the NRC website 

41,600 

34,400 

35,900 

37,900 

31,600 

E-payments made 

7 

16 

14 

7 

11 

# subscription customers (cumulative) 

1,263 

1,385 

1,378 

1,368 

1,366 

SOCIAL MEDIA (CUMULATIVE) 

 

 

 

 

 

# Twitter followers  

1,567 

1,566 

1,564 

1,570 

1,580 

# NRC Facebook fans  

10,510 

10,600 

10,600 

10,600 

10,700 

# NRC Overall Facebook Reach 

157,700 

207,200 

189,900 

62,700 

44,000 

# NRC Engaged Daily Users 

2,755 

4,807 

8,442 

3,838 

3,507 

# CDEM Facebook fans  

26,117 

26,200 

26,300 

26,300 

26,300 

# CDEM Overall Facebook Reach 

214,100 

171,100 

103,300 

111,100 

37,000 

# CDEM Engaged Daily Users 

26,600 

19,500 

5,564 

7,168 

1,895 

# Instagram followers 

1,488 

1,506 

1,520 

1,526 

1,540 

 

ENVIROSCHOOLS / EDUCATION

Enviroschools’ sustainability milestones celebrated
On 4 May, Cr Jack Craw arrived on his bike to Geckos Early Learning Centre to celebrate them becoming a Bronze Enviroschool.  They are enjoying a ‘wild’ area housing lizards and insects, growing their own kai and creating a uniquely-Aotearoa space of plants and structures.  The centre looks forward to further exploring te ao Māori through pūrākau and ngā atua.

On 9 May, Renew School also celebrated becoming a Bronze Enviroschool with Cr Jack Craw.  The students’ plant and animal pest control mahi, stream studies and involvement in the wider community is admirable. 

On 23 May Cr Joce Yeoman joined in Oromahoe School’s Enviroschools Silver celebration.  This school community includes a junior class of skink experts, meaningfully embraces te ao Māori with embedded tikanga and looks forward to exploring leadership at all levels of the school.

Teachers pest control workshop held
 On 24 May, 20 teachers gathered to learn more about using trapping hardware, how to integrate pest control into the curriculum and how to help their local ngahere thrive.  The Enviroschools and Biosecurity teams ran the workshop in conjunction with Tiakina Whangarei and the Pukenui Forest Trust.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

2022 Whakamānawa ā Taiao Environmental Awards

Winners of the fourth annual Whakamānawa ā Taiao Environmental Awards were announced on Thursday 26 May, at a celebration in Dargaville attended by over 150 finalists and supporters.

The 2022 overall winner of Te Tohu Matua - Supreme Award went to Te Kotahitanga e Mahi Kaha Trust - Project Ngā Wai Ora o Ngāpuhi for their community focused restoration of waterways around Kaikohe. The project won the Environmental Action in Water Quality Improvement award and also placed Highly Commended in the Kaitiakitanga category.

The 2022 category winners are:

Ÿ Environmental action in the community - Vision Kerikeri and Friends of Wairoa Stream

Ÿ Environmental action in pest management - Kerikeri Peninsula Conservation Charitable Trust

Ÿ Environmental action in education - Tangiteroria School

Ÿ Environmental action in water quality improvement - Te Kotahitanga e Mahi Kaha Trust - Project Ngā Wai Ora o Ngāpuhi

Ÿ Environmental leadership - Hori Parata

Ÿ Kaitiakitanga - Te Toa Whenua

Ÿ Youth environmental leader - Curtis Robinson & Jayden Edwards - Junior Fishery Officers.

Also new in 2022 is the Kiwi Coast Outstanding group or project award, recognising high achieving Northland groups and projects who have proven their commitment to restoring the health of their local native forests and wildlife, including kiwi. This special award has been introduced to broaden the reach of the awards and to support NRC partners to celebrate and recognise mahi specific to their core focus.

The Kiwi Coast Outstanding Group or Project Award went to Bay Bush Action.

More information about the Whakamānawa ā Taiao Environmental Awards programme, details of all the winners and photos from the awards celebration is available at awards.nrc.govt.nz. A full-page spread will also feature in the Northern Advocate in late June.

Emerging Leader Award

Our Marketing & Engagement Manager, Natasha Stubbing, has been named one of two winners of the AskYourTeam Emerging Leader of the Year Award at the 2022 LGFA Taituarā Local Government Excellence Awards.

The award recognizes an emerging leader, aged 35 or under, who has a proven track record of designing or delivering innovative and successful programmes, projects, processes or practices with an identifiable community impact.

As her prize, Natasha will travel with the Taituarā President and Chief Executive to the ICMA Conference in Columbus, Ohio in September this year.

2022 Tū i te Ora Scholarship winners

The eight recipients of Northland Regional Council's Tū i te Ora Scholarships programme for 2022 were confirmed as: Aya Morris, Fern Donovan, Josh Otene, Maria Secker, Rosa Harper, Shavonne Toko, Taiawhio Wati, and Tayla Bamber. Each received $3000 toward their tertiary studies.

More details on the winners and what they are studying can be found here: https://www.nrc.govt.nz/our-northland/story/?id=74458

Communications   

Ÿ Communications issued in May included seven media releases covering the following topics:   

Ÿ Duck shooters, eel fishers asked to help stop weed spread

Ÿ Air Force to help Piroa/Brynderwyn conservation work

Ÿ ‘Wallaby’ spotted in Kaipara likely a hare

Ÿ First region-wide climate adaptation strategy adopted in Northland

Ÿ Eight $3000 Tū i te ora Scholarships awarded

Ÿ Young leader recognised at national awards

Ÿ Project Nga Wai Ora ō Ngāpuhi named Whakamānawa ā Taiao

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL INFORMATION (LGOIMA) REQUESTS

Total LGOIMAs

Apr 2020 to May 2021

Apr 2021 to May 2022

14

16

Number of LGOIMAs not responded to within 20 working days

0

 

CUSTOMER SERVICES

Telephone inbound call statistics and enquiries

   

Mar 2022

April 2022

May 2022

Call volume via Customer Services 

2254

1847

2072

Average wait time 

7.6 secs

5.4 secs

7.8 secs

 

Telephone call volume over the last three years

 

1 July 2018 –
30 June 2019

1 July 2019 –
30 June 2020
 

1 July 2020 –
30 June 2021

Call volume via Customer Services 

20,812

30,566 

31,130

Mailroom email processing performance

 

March

April

May

Mail processed

851

716

913

Satisfaction monitoring

No compliments in the month of May.

The complaint is being resolved

Feedback cards, compliments, and complaints

Compliments received  

Total

Feedback cards

0

Total compliments recorded

0

 

Complaints received  

Total

Ÿ City Link

1

Total complaints recorded

1

 

8.2.8   COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

TRANSPORT 

 

REGIONAL TRANSPORT PLANNING 

 

Speed Limit Rule 

Settings of Speed Limit Rule

A new Setting of Speed Limits Rule came into effect on 19 May 2022.  This new Rule replaces the 2017 Rule and creates a new focus on speed management and promotes a regionwide approach to setting safe and appropriate speeds on both the local and State Highway network. 

 

Regional Speed Management Plans 

The purpose of the Regional Speed Management Plan is to ensure regional consistency in the approach to setting safe and appropriate speed limits.  The Plans are also intended to enable better integration of speed management with infrastructure investment by aligning with the RLTP. 

 

The District Council, as a Road Controlling Authority (RCA) has the principal role of identifying proposed speed limits.  This includes undertaking the technical assessment of the proposed speed limit that ensures the proposed limits are compliant with the technical requirements set out in the new Rule and must be considered under the Rule. 

 

The Regional Transport Committee (RTC) has a role to prepare the Consultation Draft Regional Speed Management Plan.  This includes: 

·           Compiling the information received from the District Councils into a single cohesive plan. 

·           Determining if the approaches to speed limits across the region are consistent and working with the RCA’s to make appropriate changes to ensure consistency. 

·           Provide the Regional Council with the Consultation Draft. 

 

The RTC role is principally that of coordinator, editor and approver of the Draft Speed Management Plan.  Once finalised, the RTC is responsible for providing the Draft Plan to the Director of Waka Kotahi for certification.  

 

The Regional Council has a new role to facilitate public consultation on the Draft Plan.  Consultation includes but is not limited to publishing the Plan and accepting written submissions.   

 

PASSENGER TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION 

*Bus Link figures are reported one month in arrears, due to the required information being unavailable at the time of the agenda deadline. 

Bus Link stats for April 2022   

(revenue ex GST) 

Actual    

Budget    

Variance    

Year/Date Actual    

Year/Date Budgeted    

Variance    

CityLink passengers 

20,577 

25,289 

4,712 

223,410 

264,040 

40,630 

CityLink fares  

$23,996 

$32,623 

$8,627 

$249,835 

$340,612 

$90,777 

Mid North link  

passengers 

 

99 

 

96 

 

3 

 

1,370 

 

1,464 

 

94 

Mid North Link 

 fares 

$354 

$480 

$126 

$5,033 

$7,320 

$2,287 

Hokianga Link  

passengers  

66 

48 

18 

730 

726 

4 

Hokianga Link 

 fares  

$410 

$334 

$76 

$3,865 

$5,760 

$1,895 

Far North Link  

passengers  

276 

377 

101 

2,342 

3,823 

1,481 

Far North Link  

fares  

$553 

$954 

$401 

$5,615 

$9,671 

$4,056 

Bream Bay Link passengers 

73 

24 

49 

465 

258 

207 

Bream Bay Link 

 fares collected 

$502 

$87 

$415 

$2,831 

$929 

$1,902 

Hikurangi Link  

passengers  

22 

24 

2 

199 

246 

47 

Hikurangi Link  

fares  

$58 

$63 

$5 

$478 

$673 

$195 

 

Bus Link stats for May  2022 

(revenue ex GST) 

Actual    

Budget    

 

Variance 

Year/Date Actual    

 

Year/Date Budgeted   

Variance   

CityLink Passengers    

31,953 

27,027 

4,926 

255,287 

291,067 

35,780 

CityLink Revenue    

$36,130 * 

$34,865 

$1,266 

$305,637 

$375,476 

-$69,839 

Mid North Link Passengers    

228 

108 

120 

1598 

1572 

26 

Mid North Link Revenue    

$893* 

$540 

$353 

$5,787 

$7,860 

$2,073 

Hokianga Link Passengers     

94 

54 

40 

828 

780 

48 

Hokianga Link Revenue    

$367 * 

$376 

-$9 

$4,410 

$5,426 

$1,016 

Far North Link Passengers     

334 

405 

-71 

2,676 

4,227 

1,551 

Far North Link Revenue    

$710 * 

$1,024 

-$314 

$5,920 

$10,695 

$4,775 

Bream Bay Link Passengers    

38 

24 

14 

503 

282 

221 

Bream Bay Link Revenue    

$312 * 

$86 

$226 

$2,987 

 

$1,015 

 

$1,972 

Hikurangi Link Passengers    

24 

-19 

204 

270 

-66 

Hikurangi Link Revenue    

$14* 

$63 

-$56 

$485 

$735 

-$250 

* = 50% Farebox + 50% Waka Kotahi 

 

*The fares collected are recorded at 50% actual fares taken + the 50% funded by Waka Kotahi (to be claimed) 

 

Waka Kotahi have stated that the government's COVID-19 Farebox Recovery Funding Policy will be terminated on 30 June 2022. Staff will be working on the potential financial impact that move may have on all Northland Regional Council contracted bus services. 

 

National Bus Driver Shortage 

The national driver shortage continues to have an impact on our Citylink services with the current CityLink contractor being unable to provide the necessary levels to implement our proposed School Services.   

 

Half Price Fares 

There was a definite increase in passengers carried during the month of May due in large to the half price fares. However, this government initiative, which has been open to all passengers, will cease at the end of August 2022 and will only be available to Community Card holders. 

 

Rose Street Bus Terminus Upgrade 

The Stage 1 project for the upgrade of the Rose Street bus terminus is scheduled for completion at the end of June 2022. The CityLink service bus stops will then move back from their temporary location in Vine Street. 

 

Youth Week – Free CityLink buses  

Northland Regional Council teamed up with Whangarei Youth Space and Whangarei District Council to provide free bus passes for Youth week 9-14 May 2022, to encourage our youth to try public transport, this resulted in 562 free tickets being presented.      

 

Total Mobility (TM) 

*Total Mobility Scheme figures are reported one month in arrears, due to the required information being unavailable at the time of the agenda deadline. 

 

Total Clients 

Monthly Actual Expend 

Monthly Budgeted Expend 

Monthly Variance 

Year/Date Actual Expend 

Year/Date Budgeted Expend 

Annual Variance 

 

April 2022 

 

1,284 

$20,710 

$25,000 

-$4,290 

$193,229 

$250,000 

-$56,771 

 

Total Mobility half price fares 

From Friday 1 April 2022 until Wednesday 31 August 2022, Total Mobility journeys will have an additional discount applied to the already subsidised fare. This has been made available as part of the Government’s 50% public transport Initiative. These fares are 100% claimable from Waka Kotahi, for the month of April, the fares forgone were $10,305, making the sum of Total Mobility figures - $31,015.    This government initiative will cease at the end of August 2022. 

 

Total Mobility Scheme – Far North  

NRC staff continue to work on the Far North Total Mobility Scheme, going live 1 July. The Far North District Council endorsed the development of a Total Mobility Scheme as one of the planning activities in its “Far North District Council Integrated Transport Plan”.   $31,000 local share to assist the NRC in the development of trial Total Mobility services in 2022 has been included in the Far North District Council Long Term Plan 2021-2031.  The Far North Scheme will have an annual operational budget for the first year of $75,000.  40% ($31,000) of this is funded through local share and 60% ($45,000) through national funding assistance.    

 

ROAD SAFETY UPDATE 

Road Trauma Update 

Road Fatalities Statistics for the period 1 January 2021 – 10 June 2021  

Fatalities Jan – June 2021 

Far North 

Whangārei 

Kaipara 

Northland 

National 

Local roads 

2 

2 

1 

5 

80 

State highways 

5 

2 

4 

11 

67 

TOTAL 

7 

4 

5 

16 

147 

 

Road Fatalities Statistics for the period 1 January 2022 – 10 June 2022 

Fatalities Jan – June 2022 

Far North 

Whangārei 

Kaipara 

Northland 

National 

Local roads 

3 

2 

0 

5 

96 

State highways 

3 

2 

2 

7 

71 

TOTAL 

6 

4 

2 

12 

167 

 

Motorcycle Safety - Ride Forever (R4E) Rider Training Update 

·            R4E – 2020/2021 – 186 riders completed the three courses   

·            R4E – 2021/2022 – 165 riders have completed courses to date: 

o   Bronze Course – 72 

o   Silver Course – 45 

o   Gold Course – 48 

     

Waka Kotahi & NZ Police Road Safety Promotion/Media themes for May 2022 

Road safety promotional and media related themes for the above-mentioned months will concentrate around: 

·            Speed, Safe Vehicles, Drugs & Young Drivers 

At the local level, Northland continues to produce radio, print, bus backs along with other social media to promote road safety messages specific to Northland and complimenting the ‘Road to Zero’ and ‘Safe System Approach.’ 

 

 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

National Partnership Charter 

Over the past 15 months NEMA and the CDEM Group Managers have collaborated on the development of a Partnership Charter that sets out how NEMA and CDEM Group offices will collaboratively work together. This is a new initiative, having been developed by NEMA officials and the 16 CDEM group managers. 

 

The purpose of the Partnership Charter is to outline a shared vision for an effective and enduring strategic partnership at the regional and national level, which will provide a strong “back-bone” that supports the broader emergency management sector and stakeholders, and the roadmap to achieving this. It includes:  

 

•  A shared Kaupapa (vision)  

• How our functions align and support each other  

• How NEMA and Groups work together  

• Partnership aspirations  

• What actions to take to support the achievement of our partnership aspirations. 

 

Trifecta Programme  

At the National Emergency Managers Development Group (NEMDG) meeting in May, NEMA officials ran a workshop to further refine and develop policy proposals for the Bill. The purpose of the NEMDG session was to gather any final feedback to inform the proposals to be presented to Minister Allan. Consultation with Minsters and departments will then follow before final approval from cabinet is sought, hopefully in late July and August, which will allow sufficient time for the Bill to be drafted and go into the House towards the end of the year (post local body elections).  

 

Recently released cabinet papers, which can be located at: https://www.civildefence.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/publications/Proactive-Release-Emergency-Management-System-Reform.pdf summarise the policy proposals forming the changes to the new bill.  

 

 

 

 

The key areas where changes are being made are:  

 

1.     Clarifying the roles and responsibilities of CDEM Groups and local authorities. NEMA is proposing to allocate separate functions through the Bill to clarify that: CDEM Groups are responsible for regional coordination and governance; and local authorities are responsible for delivering local emergency management in their communities and for participating in the CDEM Group.  

2.     Enabling equitable outcomes. NEMA is proposing to include a requirement in the Bill for CDEM Groups and their local authorities to consult with disproportionately impacted communities in their regions when preparing the CDEM Group Plan.  

3.     Roles and responsibilities lead and support agencies. NEMA proposes a new provision in the Bill that enables the making of regulations which establish the roles and responsibilities of (lead and support) agencies with regards to the management of hazards and emergencies. 

4.     Strengthening Māori participation. NEMA proposes six changes through the Bill to strengthen Māori participation in emergency management including: adding a Te Tiriti / Treaty clause. Māori members on Joint Committees and CEGs and establishing a National Māori Emergency Management Advisory Group. 

  

Monitoring, Alerting and Reporting (MAR) Centre 

As part of NEMA’s response to the 2018 TAG Report, work to stand up a 24/7 ‘awake’ capability 

to replace the current ‘on call’ Duty System is nearing completion. This capability (the MAR 

Centre) will be focussed on gathering and sharing information during the early stages of an 

event (including sending National Warning System messages or Emergency Mobile Alerts) or 

until the NCC/NCMC is activated. 

 

Service Level Agreements  

The Service Level Agreements between the Northland Regional Council and the Far North, Kaipara and Whangārei District Councils are currently being reviewed to ensure alignment with the recently reviewed Northland CDEM Group Plan 2021-2026. 

 

RNZ Kaitaia Mast removal 

Northland Civil Defence have been advised that the Radio New Zealand (RNZ) Kaitaia AM transmission mast located at Waipapakauri is at risk of structural failure and is beyond repair. It is required to be removed urgently and is unlikely to be replaced. The Kaitaia site provides AM radio transmissions for the northernmost areas of Northland from 20km north of Kerikeri to the top of Cape Reinga. 

 

Tsunami Information Boards  

An annual regional wide check of all the tsunami information boards has been completed. Only one board has had to be replaced. 

 

Northland Lifelines Group  

The Northland Lifelines Group met on Friday 13 May 2022.  The agenda included presentations on the response to Cyclone Dovi by Northpower and Top Energy and an update on the draft results of the Northland Region Infrastructure Climate Change Assessment by Tonkin and Taylor. 

 

MARITIME 

There were 18 Maritime Incidents reported in May. Seven incidents involved abandoned vessels or vessels that were sinking and were removed by Maritime staff. A collision in Whangarei Harbour between a fishing vessel and pleasure craft was also being investigated. 

 

A logging truck that crashed into the Hokianga Harbour had 250 litres of Diesel removed by Maritime staff that prevented a spillage into the Harbour. The truck was then recovered. 

The rest of the incidents mainly involved moorings and damaged aids to Navigation. 

 

The ‘Waikare’ was out of the water for 10 days for antifouling.  Once the vessel was antifouled and back in the water the Ninepin weather buoy was removed for servicing and maintenance.  

 

12 large navigation signs were refurbished, and new sign panels installed. 

 

The port and harbour safety management systems received their 3 yearly reviews by a panel of experts drawn from other ports and regions, along with a Maritime NZ representative. This is part of the national peer review system that is in place. The results of the review have not yet been received; however, the review did go well with visits to the Bay of Islands and Marsden point.  

 

The Harbourmaster, along with staff Peter Thomas, and Cathy Orevich participated in a national oil spill exercise Whai Manu in Auckland over three days. The exercise was testing systems from a high level of incident control from Wellington, through to a full incident command centre based at the spill in Wellington. These large-scale exercises are only held every few years.   

 

 

 

NRC have nine staff on the national response team, probably the highest representation amongst the regions. All costs of staff time are borne by the oil pollution fund.  

 

The navigational safety bylaw review has been progressing but will most likely go on hold Maritime NZ have informed that the related maritime rule part 91 is being reviewed at the same time. Staff will update council at a workshop.  

 

RIVERS AND NATURAL HAZARDS 

RIVERS 

Awanui 

Favourable Autumn weather conditions and 3 contracts currently in progress (1 completed).  

Contract 21/05 - Northern Stopbanks. Approx. 70% complete. Satisfactory progress with stopbanks and benching earthworks with minimal issues. Reinstatement of first few sites now complete and prep for over-wintering of remaining sites in hand. 

Contract 21/09 - Switzer Bench. Earthworks are now 90% complete and rock revetment at rear of Bell’s Produce well underway (25%) and will progress into winter (materials supply & river levels permitting).  

Contract 21/10 - Rugby Club.  Earthworks 80% complete. Rock revetment is phased to continue into winter (materials & river levels permitting) and has the advantage that we have rock storage on hard stand, so less risk from wet weather.  

Primary School bench now 100% complete and community incredibly happy with reinstatement of Showgrounds areas. FNDC cycle path ties in very nicely with NRC reinstatement.  

Planting planned for several completed areas and local (Māori-owned) contractors being lined up for this work. 

Otīria/Moerewa 

Stage 1 is nearing completion.  Stage 2 Bridge tender is live on GETS closes 23 June 

Kerikeri 

Waipapa Industrial Estate Flood Mitigation is approximate 85% completed.  Because of the wet weather we have decided to winterise the site for completion next year. 

 

NATURAL HAZARDS     

Work Streams    

Status    

Comments    

Whangārei (CBD) River Catchment Flood Model   

75% complete 

Upgrade of the hydraulic model catchment(s) including new structures, updated LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and sea level rise values and recalibration. Specific river/stream structures inspections have been completed over the last month.  

 

Following discussions with WDC (Whangārei District Council), Ewaters (consultants on the project) will now also be engaged to include the CBD stormwater network as part of the same package (variation).  

 

WDC will be funding the additional costs, approximately $90,000, related to the additional tasks.  Our aim was to complete the project, including the additional tasks, but has been delayed until the end of 2022 due to resources issues by the consultant

 

Website Natural Hazards Portal   

91% complete 

Morphum Environmental has been engaged to develop the portal with support and input from colleagues across various departments.  

 

The third phase of the development of the portal is ongoing, e.g., landing page, flooding and Te Ao Māori aspects, story maps, property viewer and sea level rise viewer.  

 

It is our vision to ‘go public’ has been delayed until the beginning August 2022 due to internal GIS (Geographic Information System) resourcing. Prior to that we will be presenting this to our Councillors, and other appropriate platforms, for feedback. Simultaneously it is our intention to share this with our District Council colleagues before going live. 

Raupo Drainage Scheme – Coastal Flood Hazard Analysis & Mitigation Options  

90% complete 

Water Technology (WT) have been engaged to do detailed hydraulic modelling from all perspectives, i.e., catchment, river and most importantly coastal.  

The objective is to establish a detailed base model and to develop flood hazard mitigation options, particularly from a coastal perspective, and adaptation planning.  

 

The project team consists of NRC and KDC staff, Chair of the Drainage Committee, and Consultants. NRC are taking the modelling analysis lead on this project, i.e., contract management (NRC Budget). KDC are collating the assets data covered under their budgets. 

 

Surveys, data collection, assets inspection and ‘building’ of the hydraulic model have been completed. First draft ‘results’ have been reviewed by the project team. Further analysis and ‘flood event scenarios’ are underway with results expected at the end of April. The project is on target to be completed by the end of June 2022. 

 

This project will support the pilot project under the Te Taitokerau Climate Adaptation Strategy (TTCAS) in which scoping, and planning process is underway; early engagement has commenced with KDC. 

Natural Hazards technical and planning support to District Councils on Plan Changes and Rules 

Ongoing 

Following the publication of our coastal hazard maps and the regionwide flood maps, complimentary to the priority rivers flood maps, further technical, consultative, and planning support / guidance is provided to the DCs. This follows the commitments to DCs prior to the publication of the coastal hazard maps. 

Te Taitokerau Climate  

Adaptation Strategy (TTCAS): Professional Services Panel 

 

Ongoing 

NRC, in collaboration with and on behalf of Kaipara District Council, Whangarei District Council and Far North District Council will be going out for Request(s) for Proposal (RfPs), 6th May 2022, to establish a regional Panel of Professional Services to support the implementation of the TTCAS actions, e.g., district’s pilot projects and beyond. This will provide all four Councils with informed and preselected providers, being able to have shared services, cost, and time effective. Subsequent contracts will be directly with the respective Council as per respective procurement procedures. 

A total of 42 high quality submissions were received; assessment completion and agreement with preferred respondents has been delayed to the 23rd June 2022 due to the high volume of respondents.  

The assessment will be conducted by representatives from all four councils. 

 

CLIMATE CHANGE RESPONSE 

NRC Climate Change Strategy “Ngā Taumata o te Moana” and Implementation Plan 

Progress is ongoing. This Strategy touches every aspect of Council business. In undertaking a ‘stocktake’ of current actions, staff are meeting with teams across Council to build relationships, identify current climate-related actions and areas where more could be done.  This stocktake will form a baseline for work to set up a monitoring, evaluation, review, and reporting system to track our progress.  

 

Discussions over the past month have traversed Council’s procurement framework, communications and engagement, economics, biodiversity, river and natural hazards forward planning and strategy, EVs, transport planning and emergency management. 

 

Staff have also recently met with Northpower, Northland Inc and attended the Collaboration Te Taitokerau agricultural forum in Waitangi. Staff have also participated in workshops on the Carbon Neutral Government Program and attended the Carbon and Energy Professionals conference in Rotorua. A number of educational opportunities have also been seized including working with EnviroSchools on Te Kete Aronui about climate change as well as a presentation planned for Whangārei Girls High.  

 

Two papers were presented to the most recent Climate Change Working Party meeting, one on climate governance and another on monitoring and reporting. Both papers generated significant discussion. Staff are working on next steps. 

 

There continues to be significant volume of new climate related policy and legislation in development. This is not insignificant and continues to challenge staff’s ability to be proactive and contribute meaningfully consistently. NZ’s first emissions budgets and Emission Reduction Plan were released this month. 

 

Toitū have been engaged to baseline our GHG emissions, certify our accounting and provide advice on where further reductions could occur. Initial kick off meetings will be held in coming weeks. 

 

Te Taitokerau Climate Adaptation Strategy (TTCAS) - Programme Implementation 

Joint Strategy now adopted by all four (4) Councils.