Council

Tuesday 27 September 2022 at 10.30am

 

 

AGENDA

 


Council Meeting

27 September 2022

Northland Regional Council Agenda

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chamber

36 Water Street, Whangārei

on Tuesday 27 September 2022, commencing at 10.30am

 

Recommendations contained in the council agenda are NOT council decisions. Please refer to council minutes for resolutions.

 

RĪMITI (Item)                                                                                                                                           Page

1.0      Ngā Mahi Whakapai / Housekeeping

Key Health and Safety points to note:

·        If the fire alarm goes off – exit down the stairwell to the assembly point which is the visitor carpark.

·        Earthquakes – drop, cover and hold

·        Visitors please make sure you have signed in at reception, and that you sign out when you leave. Please wear your name sticker.

·        The toilets are on the opposite side of the stairwell.

·        Please adhere to the recommended Covid alert guidance that applies.

2.0      Karakia Timatanga – Tauāki ā roto / Opening karakia

2.0A   MINUTE’S SILENCE TO MARK THE DEATH OF HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN

3.0      Ngā Whakapahā / apologies

4.0      Ngā Whakapuakanga / DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

5.0      Ngā Whakaae Miniti me te Mahere Mahi / Council Minutes and Action Sheet

5.1      Confirmation of Minutes - 23 August 2022                                                         6

5.2      Receipt of Action Sheet                                                                                          16

6.0      Ngā Ripoata Putea / Financial Reports

6.1      Financial Report to 31 August 2022                                                                    18

6.2      Adoption of the 2022 Annual Report                                                                  21

7.0      Ngā Take / Decision Making Matters

7.1      Change to start date for incoming Chief Executive Officer                         202

7.2      Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group - replacement members           204

7.3      Matauranga Māori Freshwater Framework                                                    207

7.4      Delegations for decisions for resolving appeals on the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland                                                                                                 213

7.5      Water Resilience Fund - Long Term Plan Year 2 and 3 Allocations           217

7.6      Electric Car Charging Expansion and Vehicle Purchasing Policy                 223

7.7      Minor Amendment to Regional Pest Plan                                                       228

7.8      NRC Tiriti Organisational Review (Te Tiriti Health Check)                           232

8.0      Ngā Ripoata Mahi / Operational Reports

8.1      Chair's Report to Council                                                                                     233

8.2      Chief Executive’s Report to Council                                                                  235

8.3      Residents' survey results to year end 30 June 2022                                     284

8.4      Chief Executive Officer's Key Performance Indicators - final report         310

9.0      Receipt of Committee Minutes and Working Party/Group Updates

9.1      Receipt of Committee Minutes                                                                          323

9.2      Working Party Updates and Chairpersons' Briefings                                    335

10.0    Kaupapa ā Roto (Business with the Public Excluded)                                          337

10.1    Confirmation of Confidential Minutes - 23 August 2022

10.2    Human Resources Report - August 2022

10.3    Purchase of Whangārei CBD Properties

10.4    Progressing an Investment Property Redevelopment

10.5    Nomination of Directors to Marsden Maritime Holdings Limited

10.6    Independent Director Nomination

10.7    Bonus Payment   


 

ACC - Accident Compensation Corporation

ALGIM - Association of Local Government Information Management

AMA - Aquaculture Management Area

AMP - Asset Management Plan/Activity Management Plan

AP - Annual Plan

BOI - Bay of Islands

BOPRC - Bay of Plenty Regional Council

CAPEX - Capital Expenditure (budget to purchase assets)

CBEC - Community, Business and Environment Centre

CCO – Council Controlled Organisation

CCTO – Council Controlled Trading Organisation

CDEM - Civil Defence Emergency Management

CEEF – Chief Executives Environment Forum

CEG - Co-ordinating Executive Group

CEO - Chief Executive Officer

CIMS - Co-ordinated Incident Management System (emergency management structure)

CMA - Coastal Marine Area

CPCA - Community Pest Control Areas

CRI - Crown Research Institute

DHB - District Health Board 

DOC - Department of Conservation

DP – District Plan

E350 – Extension 350 programme

ECA - Environmental Curriculum Award

ECAN - Environment Canterbury

EECA - Energy Efficiency Conservation Authority

EF - Environment Fund

EMA - Employers and Manufacturers Association

EOC - Emergency Operations Centre

EPA - Environmental Protection Authority

ETS - Emissions Trading Scheme

FDE - Farm Dairy Effluent

FNDC - Far North District Council

FNHL - Far North Holdings Limited

FPP - First Past the Post

GE - Genetic Engineering

GIS - Geographic Information System

GMO - Genetically Modified Organism

HBRC - Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Horizons - Brand name of Manawatu-Wanganui Regional Council

HR - Human Resources

HSNO - Hazardous Substances & New Organisms Act 

HSWA - Health and Safety at Work Act 2015

IHEMP – Iwi/Hapū Environmental Management Plan

ILGACE - Iwi and Local Government Chief Executives Forum

IPPC - Invited Private Plan Change

IRIS - Integrated Regional Information System

KDC - Kaipara District Council 

KPI - Key Performance Indicator

LAWA – Land, Air, Water Aotearoa

LEA - Local Electoral Act 2001

LGA - Local Government Act 2002

LGNZ - Local Government New Zealand

LGOIMA - Local Government Official Information & Meetings Act 1987

LIDAR – Light detection and ranging

LTI – Long time injury

LTP - Long Term Plan

MBIE – Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment

MFE - Ministry for the Environment

MFL – Māori Freehold Land 

MHWS - Mean High Water Springs

MMH - Marsden Maritime Holdings Limited

MNZ - Maritime New Zealand

MOH - Ministry of Health

MOT - Ministry of Transport

MPI - Ministry for Primary Industries

MSD - Ministry of Social Development

MTAG – Māori Technical Advisory Group (a subgroup of TTMAC)

NCMC - National Crisis Management Centre

NDHB - Northland District Health Board

NEMA – National Emergency Management Agency

NES - National Environmental Standards

NFT – Northland | Forward Together

NGO - Non-Governmental Organisation

NIF - Northland Intersectoral Forum

NINC - Northland Inc. Limited

NIWA - National Institute of Water and Atmosphere

NORTEG - Northland Technical Advisory Group

NPS - National Policy Statement

NPS-FM - National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

NZCPS - New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement

NZTA – Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency

NZTE - New Zealand Trade and Enterprise

NZWWA - New Zealand Water and Wastes Association

OFI - Opportunity for Improvement

OPEX – Operating Expenditures

OSH - Occupational Safety & Health

OTS – Office of Treaty Settlements

PCBU - Person Conducting Business or Undertaking

PGF – Provincial Growth Fund

PPE - Personal Protective Equipment

RAP - Response Action Plan

RBI - Regional Broadband Initiative

RFI - Request for Information

RFP - Request for Proposal

RLTP - Regional Land Transport Plan

RMA - Resource Management Act 1991

RMG - Resource Managers Group (Regional Councils)

RMZ - Riparian Management Zone

ROI - Return on Investment

RP – Regional Plan

RPMP - Regional Pest Management Plan

RPMS - Regional Pest Management Strategy

RPS - Regional Policy Statement

RPTP – Regional Public Transport Plan

RRSAP – Regional Road Safety Action Plan

RSG – Regional Sector Group

RSHL - Regional Software Holdings Ltd

RTC - Regional Transport Committee

RTO - Regional Tourism Organisation

SIG – Special Interest Group

SIPO - Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives

SITREP - Situation Report

SOE - State of Environment (or) State Owned Enterprise

SOI – Statement of Intent

STV - Single Transferable Vote

TAG - Technical Advisory Group

TKoT  - Te Kahu o Taonui

Tier 1 - Site level plan or response for an oil spill

Tier 2 - Regional level plan or response to an oil spill

Tier 3 - National level plan or response to an oil spill

TLA - Territorial Local Authority – City & District Councils

TON – Top of the North (regions)

TTMAC – Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party

TTNEAP – Tai Tokerau Northland Economic Action Plan

TMP - Treasury Management Plan

TOR - Terms of Reference

TPK - Te Puni Kōkiri (Ministry of Māori Development)

TWWAG – Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group

UNISA - Upper North Island Strategic Alliance

WDC - Whangarei District Council

WRC - Waikato Regional Council

WSMP - Workplace Safety Management Practices

 

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 5.1

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Confirmation of Minutes - 23 August 2022

From:

Meloney Tupou, Maori Governance and Engagement Support Admin

Authorised by:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist, on 21 September 2022

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the minutes of the council meeting held on 23 August 2022,  be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Confirmation of Minutes - 23 August 2022  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 5.1

27 September 2022Attachment 1










Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 5.2

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Receipt of Action Sheet

From:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist

Authorised by:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist, on 20 September 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

The purpose of this report is to enable the meeting to receive the current action sheet.

 

Nga mahi tutohutia / Recommendation

That the action sheet be received.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Council Action Sheet - September 2022  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 5.2

27 September 2022Attachment 1


 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 6.1

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Financial Report to 31 August 2022

From:

Vincent McColl, Financial Accountant and Taka Skipwith, Financial Accountant

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 20 September 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report is to inform council of the year to date (YTD) financial result to August 2022. Council has achieved a YTD surplus after transfers to and from reserves of $1.2M which is $597K favourable to budget.

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Financial Report to 31 August 2022’ by Vincent McColl, Financial Accountant and Taka Skipwith, Financial Accountant and dated 15 September 2022, be received.

 

Background/Tuhinga

  

 

 

 

 


 

Revenue

Year to date revenue is $13.7M, which is $1.5M or 12.3% above budget.  

  

 

 

Expenditure

Year to date expenditure is $10.3M, which is $117K or 1.1% below budget. 

 



Salary Variances

Across council there is a $472K favourable salaries variance predominantly due to the time to complete recruitment of positions identified in the LTP (Long Term Plan).

 

The salary variance is broken down below:

 

August YTD

Gross salary variance

$612K

Less: Subsidised work programmes

($16K)

Less: Annual leave earned not taken

($124K)

Net salary variance

$472K

 

 

Transfers to reserves

For the year to date there has been a net transfer to reserves of $2.1M compared to a budgeted net transfer to reserves of $1.1M.  This is predominantly due to:

Ÿ $1.1M higher than budgeted transfers to externally managed fund reserves due to higher than budgeted gains on the short term and long-term funds.

 

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 6.2

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Adoption of the 2022 Annual Report

From:

Simon Crabb, Finance Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 21 September 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

The Full 2022 Annual Report is attached as Attachment One. The final formatting and layout of this document is still being performed.

The independent member of council, Stuart Henderson, has performed a review of the 2022                                                                                                                                          Annual Report and has provided a written report summarising his observations, attached as Attachment Two.

Deloitte has issued clearance and prepared a report (refer Attachment Three) on the matters arising from their audit.  The Deloitte engagement partner, Peter Gulliver will attend the September 2022 council meeting to present this report to council.

The final signed audit opinion will be released upon council’s adoption of the 2022 Annual Report, and Deloitte receiving the signed letters of compliance and representation.

 

Recommendations

1.         That the report ‘Adoption of the 2022 Annual Report’ by Simon Crabb, Finance Manager and dated 6 September 2022, be received.

2.         That the council's audited Annual Report and financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2022 be adopted pursuant to section 98(3) of the Local Government Act 2002.

3.         That the Chief Executive Officer and the Chair be authorised to sign the 2022 Annual Report compliance statement and letter of representation, and the letters of representation in relation to the: 2021/22 debenture trust deed report, and 2021/22 stock register report.

4.         That the Chief Executive Officer be authorised to make any minor editorial and presentation changes to the 2022 Annual Report and Summary Annual Report if required.

5.         That the Chief Executive Officer be authorised to approve the release of the 2022 Summary Annual Report pursuant to section 98(4) of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Adopt

Facilitate the adoption and public availability of the 2022 Annual Report and 2022 Summary Annual Report within the statutory timeframes set out in the LGA 2002.

None

2

Do not Adopt

The annual report can be amended if required

A special council meeting would need to be called before 31 October 2022 to adopt a revised 2022 Annual Report and comply with the Local Government Act 2002.

 

The staff’s recommended option is 1.

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

This decision will have no impact on the ability of council to protectively respond to the impacts of climate change now or in the future.

2.    Environmental Impact

This decision will not have an impact on any environmental risks.

3.    Community views

Being a purely administrative matter council can make decisions relating to this report without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

4.    Māori impact statement

This report relates to an administrative matter and therefore does not have a direct impact on Māori.

5.    Financial implications

If any significant changes are required to the 2022 Annual Report or the 2022 Summary Annual Report, Deloitte would need to be re-engaged to review the changes and potentially charge additional audit fees

6.    Implementation issues

Paragraph 98(3) of the Local Government Act 2002 stipulates that an Annual Report must be adopted by resolution within 4 months after the end of the financial year to which it relates.  In council’s case this deadline is 31 October 2022. Should the 2022 Annual Report not be adopted at the 27 September 2022 council meeting, then an extraordinary council meeting would be required prior to 31 October 2022 to adopt the Report and comply with paragraph 98(3) of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

7.    Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is of low significance when assessed against council’s Significance and Engagement Policy because it has previously been consulted on and provided for in council’s Long-Term Plan and/or is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tāngata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council can make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

 

 

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

The recommendations in this report are consistent with sections 98 and 99 of the Local Government Act 2002 regarding the timeframes for adoption and public availability of the Annual Report and the requirement for an audit report to be included in both the full Annual Report and Summary Annual Report.

Background/Tuhinga

2021/22 Financial Result

Council posted a total comprehensive revenue and expense surplus for the 2021/22 financial year of $18.979M.  At the August 2022 council meeting, the draft net surplus after transfers from/(to) special reserves presented to council was $44K.

The movement from the August draft result to the total comprehensive revenue and expense reported in the 2022 Annual Report is explained in Table One.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: 2022 Annual Report

Attachment 2: Stuart Henderson Review - 2022 Annual Report and Audit

Attachment 3: Deloitte Report to Council  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 6.2

27 September 2022Attachment 1



























































































































































Council Meeting  ITEM: 6.2

27 September 2022Attachment 2




Council Meeting  ITEM: 6.2

27 September 2022Attachment 3






















Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.1

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Change to start date for incoming Chief Executive Officer

From:

Beryl Steele, Human Resources Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 15 September 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

The current Chief Executive Officer’s employment agreement finishes at midnight on 30 September 2022 however currently the incoming CEO’s agreement does not start until 3 October 2022.  This would mean that there is no CEO or anyone in an acting role for the period of 1 and 2 October.  It is therefore recommended that the incoming CEO’s start date is brought forward to 1 October 2022.

 

Recommendations:

1.         That the report ‘Change to start date for incoming Chief Executive Officer’ by Beryl Steele, Human Resources Manager and dated 15 September 2022, be received.

2.         That the incoming Chief Executive Officer’s start date is brought forward to 1 October 2022 with him starting directly after the current Chief Executive Officer’s contract finishes.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

The incoming CEO’s start date is brought forward to 1 October 2022.

We would have a CEO in place if there was an emergency on 1 and or 2 October or if any other decision making is required over the weekend.

No disadvantages

2

We leave the start date for the incoming CEO until 3 October 2022.

No advantages

We would not have a CEO in place if there was an emergency on 1 and or 2 October or if any other decision making is required over the weekend.

3

Council delegate acting responsibilities to the Deputy CEO

We have someone who has delegated responsibility on 1 and or 2 October or if any other decision making is required over the weekend.

No disadvantages

 

The staff’s recommended option is one.

Considerations

1.    Climate and Environmental Impacts

There are no climate or environmental impacts.

 

2.    Community views

Community consultation is not required.

 

3.    Māori impact statement

This is an administrative decision and does not require consultation with Māori.

 

4.    Financial implications

This will not have any financial implications.

 

5.    Implementation issues

               This will not have any implementation issues.

 

6.    Significance and engagement

This does not trigger the significance and engagement policy

 

7.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

Ensuring that we have a CEO or Acting CEO in place directly after the current CEO finishes his contract will mean that we are able to comply with any legislative and policy compliance and mitigate any risks should there be an emergency or decisions that need to be made on1 and 2 October 2022.

Background/Tuhinga

The current CEO’s employment agreement finishes at midnight on 30 September 2022 however currently the incoming CEO’s agreement does not start until 3 October 2022.  This would mean that there is no CEO for the period of 1 and 2 October 2022.  It is therefore recommended that the incoming CEO’s start date is brought forward to 1 October 2022, directly after the current CEO’s contract finishes.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.2

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group - replacement members

From:

Alison Newell, Policy Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Ruben Wylie, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 12 September 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

Earlier this year Millan Ruka stood down from the Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group (TWWAG).  Nominations were asked for from existing TWWAG and Te Taitokerau Māori and Council (TTMAC) members and three names were put forward at the July TTMAC meeting: Hona Edwards, Sheila Taylor and Celia Witehira.  All three were contacted to confirm their availability and interest, and Hona Edwards respectfully declined.  The views and advice of the two TWWAG co-chairs (Delaraine Armstrong and Dave Milner[1]) were sought.  The selection panel (councillors Blaikie and Yeoman, Juliane Chetham1 and Mira Norris) have since considered the two candidates.  The selection panel recommend that given their complementary skill sets both Sheila and Celia be appointed to TWWAG.

 

The membership of TWWAG in its Terms of Reference is between 12 and 15. There are currently 13 members and so the appointment of two additional members is consistent with the Terms of Reference. There is also sufficient budget. It is therefore recommended that council approve the recommendations of the selection panel and appoint both Sheila Taylor and Celia Witehira to TWWAG.

 

Recommendations:

1.         That the report ‘Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group - replacement members’ by Alison Newell, Policy Specialist and dated 18 August 2022, be received.

2.         That Sheila Taylor and Celia Witehira be appointed as members of the Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group.

 

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Agree with Selection Panel’s recommendation

Takes advantage of both candidates’ skills and expertise, providing TWWAG with more resource

Timely resolution allowing TWWAG to continue its work

Aligns with advice from tangata whenua

None

2

Disagree with Selection Panel’s recommendations and ask them to reconsider

None

Selection Panel would have to be reconvened

Would take time meaning TWWAG is without that capacity for longer

Goes against advice from tangata whenua

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1.

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

Not applicable

2.    Environmental Impact

Not applicable

3.    Community views

Not applicable

4.    Māori impact statemen

The views and advice of both co-chairs of TWWAG and the two TTMAC representatives on the selection panel have been sought.  Due to potential perceived conflict of interest two recused themselves from the selection process. The recommendation from the selection panel to appoint both Sheila and Celia reflects the advice and views of the two tangata whenua representatives who were involved in the selection process.

5.    Financial implications

TWWAG membership costs are already included in the LTP and the cost of the additional members can be accommodated within existing budgets.

6.    Implementation issues

None.  Both Sheila and Celia have already indicated they are available and willing to commit their time and skills to the work of TWWAG.

 

7.    Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because it is part of council’s day to day activities. This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua, given it relates to membership of the Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group it clearly is, but rather that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

 

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

None applicable.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.3

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Matauranga Māori Freshwater Framework

From:

Ben Lee, Planning and Policy Manager and Jason Donaghy, Natural Resources Monitoring Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Ruben Wylie, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 14 September 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

Council has committed to developing a Mātauranga Māori Freshwater Framework (the framework).

 

Council decided, based on the advice of Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party (TTMAC):

·    To allocate approximately $100k for this financial year (from the $250k/year Te Mana o te Wai fund) to the development of a Mātauranga Māori Freshwater Framework (the framework)[2]

·    For Māori Technical Advisory Group (MTAG) to prepare a proposed scope of work for the framework.  This advice to be provided to TTMAC and then to council[3].

 

TTMAC considered MTAG’s advice on the scope of work for the framework at their 8 September 2022.  The recommendations below reflect TTMAC’s advice.

 

Recommendations:

1.         That the report ‘Matauranga Māori Freshwater Framework’ by Ben Lee, Planning and Policy Manager and Jason Donaghy, Natural Resources Monitoring Manager and dated 7 September 2022, be received.

2.         That the Mātauranga Māori Freshwater Framework will address:

a.        the involvement of tangata whenua in councils environmental monitoring (as set out in action 7, Tāiki e)

b.        the support of tangata whenua with their freshwater monitoring (as set out in action 8, Tāiki e)

c.         the involvement of tangata whenua in compliance monitoring (as set out in action 9, Tāiki e)

d.        the support of tangata whenua to undertake on-the-ground activities to improve te mana o te wai.

3.         That the following process is followed for developing the Mātauranga Māori Freshwater Framework:

a.        Consultancy services are employed to assist with preparing the framework

b.        Staff work with the Māori Technical Advisory Group (MTAG) to refine the scope of the request for proposals for consultancy services and to determine the criteria for selecting the successful consultant.

c.         A group consisting of three MTAG members (to be determined by MTAG) provide advice to council staff on the award of the consultancy services.  The MTAG members to be paid a meeting allowance (in accordance with the Non-elected Members Meetings Allowance Policy) for the meeting where advice is provided to council staff.

d.        The award of the consultancy services be undertaken by at least two senior council staff in accordance with council procurement procedures.

e.        The endorsement and adoption process for the framework be as follows:

i.          MTAG endorses it to TTMAC

ii.         TTMAC endorses to council

iii.        Council adopts.

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Proceed with developing the Matauranga Māori Freshwater Framework in accordance with the scope and process as recommended.

Consistent with TTMAC and staff advice

 

None

2

Proceed with developing the Matauranga Māori Freshwater Framework but with an alternative scope and/or process as recommended.

None

Counter to TTMAC and staff advice

 

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1.  Council has already committed to preparing the Matauranga Māori Freshwater Framework, so the decision is about the scope and process.  Staff are of view that TTMAC’s advice is reasonable and will enable MTAG members to provide staff with technical advice on each of the proposals

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

The decision will have no impact on climate change or vice versa.

2.    Environmental Impact

The decision (to approve the scope and process for developing the framework) will not have a direct impact on the environment.  However, the framework will support activities benefiting the environment over time.

3.    Community views

No views, other than TTMAC, have been sought on the scope and process for developing the framework.

 

4.    Māori impact statement

The recommendations are consistent with the advice of TTMAC.  No other Māori views have been sought and nor are they considered necessary.  The views of TTMAC are considered to provide an appropriate level of understanding of Māori views given the nature of the decision.

5.    Financial implications

There are no financial implications.  Funding has already been approved.

6.    Implementation issues

Staff are of the view the proposed scope and process as recommended by TTMAC are reasonable and there is sufficient approved funding to accommodate the proposed scope and process.  The process allows for consultancy services to be engaged which will mitigate the impact on staff resources.

 

7.    Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, the recommendations are of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because there is existing budget to accommodate the process and scope as recommended, and the recommendations reflect the advice of TTMAC.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

On 26 July 2022 council adopted Tāiki e - the NRC Te Tiriti Strategy and Implementation Plan.  The recommended scope includes the implementation of several actions from Tāiki e – refer Background section for more information.  More broadly the decisions contribute to council’s commitments in Te Pae tawhiti:

·    By 2024 – there is an enduring partnership between tangata whenua and council that strengthens Māori communities. 

·    By 2031 – council is recognised by Māori as a leading organisation for the way it meets aspirations of Māori. 

 The decision is not inconsistent with any known policy or legislation. 

Background/Tuhinga

Introduction

In 2020 central government released its National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM).

 

It requires freshwater to be managed in a way that gives effect to Te Mana of te Wai[4] (TMOTW), including by:

·    involving tangata whenua,

·    prioritising the health and wellbeing of water bodies, then the essential needs of people, followed by other uses,

·    enabling the application of mātauranga Māori, to the management of freshwater, and

·    investigating use of transfer of powers, joint management agreements and mana whakahono a rohe.

 

Council has allocated $250,000 a year ongoing from this financial year (starting 1 July 2022) as part of its commitment to implement Te Mana o Te Wai. 

Council decided (based on the advice of TTMAC):

·    To allocate approximately $100k (of the $250k) to the development of a Mātauranga Māori Freshwater Framework (the framework)[5]

·    For MTAG to prepare a proposed scope of work for the framework. This advice to be provided to TTMAC and then to council[6].

 

In the conversations with TTMAC and council, it was suggested the framework could include:

·    How mātauranga Māori is used for monitoring progress towards freshwater target attributes states and environmental outcomes in the freshwater plan change

·    Supporting kaitiaki to undertake their own freshwater monitoring mahi

·    Involving tangata whenua in the development of council freshwater monitoring programmes (e.g. wetlands, threatened species, and sediment)

·    Supporting kaitiaki to undertake activities to improve te mana o te wai.

 

Since council’s decision to progress with the framework, council has adopted Tāiki e - the NRC Te Tiriti Strategy and Implementation Plan[7].

There are three relevant actions in Tāiki e that overlap with the indicated scope of the framework (bold added for emphasis):

7.         Taking into account the existing tools and models available, develop and fund a culturally appropriate council environmental monitoring programme that:

a.      addresses iwi and hapū interests and concerns in the monitoring of the environment;

b.      includes the incorporation of mātauranga Māori, tikanga Māori and recognition of the role of Tangata Whenua as kaitiaki;

c.      recognises and provides for any cultural monitoring tools endorsed by iwi and hapū;

d.      is consistently implemented as a component of NRC environmental monitoring and reporting practices and processes; and

e.      is reviewed and updated every 3 years for its effectiveness and efficiency.

8.         Taking into account the existing tools and models available, develop and fund a culturally appropriate programme that enables and supports tangata whenua to undertake their own freshwater monitoring aspirations that:

a.      addresses iwi and hapū interests and concerns in the monitoring of the environment;

b.      includes the incorporation of mātauranga Māori, tikanga Māori and recognition of the role of Tangata Whenua as kaitiaki;

c.      recognises and provides for any cultural monitoring tools endorsed by iwi and hapū;

d.      is consistently recognised and incorporated where appropriate as a component of NRC environmental monitoring and reporting practices and processes; and

e.      is reviewed and updated every 3 years for its effectiveness and efficiency.

9.         Review, update and embed how NRC delivers its regulatory services to ensure regulatory activities (e.g., resource consents and compliance monitoring) are undertaken in a culturally appropriate manner and seek to include iwi and hapū to the greatest extent possible, including by:

d.      Committing funding to consistently resource iwi and hapū for undertaking this work.

Scope

MTAG’s advice to TTMAC[8] was that the framework implement the three Tāiki e actions (7, 8 and 9 as set out above). 

Action 8 is focussed just on freshwater while actions 7 and 9 are not limited to freshwater.  While the concept of the framework comes from a council response to the NPS for Freshwater Management, MTAG recommended that TTMAC support the framework being broader than freshwater to enable implementation of Tāiki e actions 7 and 9 in their entirety.  Otherwise, it would mean the non-freshwater monitoring aspects of 7 and 9 would be addressed separately – which does not make sense from a holistic perspective.

The three Tāiki e actions do not cover supporting kaitiaki freshwater restoration efforts. The direction from TTMAC was that the indicative scope be expanded to allow the $250k/year TMOTW funding to be used for such activities.  It is therefore proposed the framework also include a programme for how council will support tangata whenua to undertake on-the-ground activities (such as riparian planting) to improve te mana o te wai.

 

In summary, the recommended scope for the framework is a plan for how council will:

·    involve tangata whenua in councils environmental monitoring (action 7, Tāiki e)

·    support tangata whenua with their environmental monitoring (action 8, Tāiki e)

·    involve tangata whenua in compliance monitoring (action 9, Tāiki e)

·    support tangata whenua to undertake on-the-ground activities to improve te mana o te wai

Staff support the recommended scope.

Process for preparing the framework

Although advice from MTAG and TTMAC was initially sought to assist with the scope of the framework, both entities gave the view that there would also be value in giving advice on the process by which the framework is developed and ultimately adopted. The recommendation 3 reflects TTMAC’s advice. Staff support the recommended process.

 

 

 

Key steps

The following are the key steps and indicative timeframes for developing the framework (assuming council adopts the recommendations)

·    Request for proposals for consultancy services – Early Nov ‘22

·    Appoint consultant – December ‘22

·    Draft framework - March ‘23

·    Final Framework presented to MTAG for endorsement– April ‘23

·    Framework presented to TTMAC for endorsement – May ‘23

·    Framework presented to council for adoption – June ’23.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.4

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Delegations for decisions for resolving appeals on the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland

From:

Michael Payne, Policy Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Ruben Wylie, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 12 September 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga | Executive Summary

This report seeks to ensure that arrangements are in place to enable decisions to be made, if required, to resolve appeals to the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland during council recess (the time between the current council leaving office and the swearing in of the incoming council following the local body elections which will be held on Saturday 8 October 2022). 

It is also proposed that these measures are in place until 1 February 2023 to provide continuity until the relevant sub-committee of council or other delegations are established.

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia | Recommendations

1.         That the report ‘Delegations for decisions for resolving appeals on the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland’ by Michael Payne, Policy Specialist and dated 7 September 2022, be received.

2.         That in the period between 7 October 2022 and 1 February 2023, council delegates to the Chief Executive Officer the authority to make decisions on the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland, in relation to appeals before the Environment Court.

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Delegate authority to the Chief Executive Officer to make decisions in respect of Proposed Regional Plan appeals matters during the council recess period

Ensures measures are in place in the event an urgent decision is required during this time.

Council does not have the opportunity to participate in appeal decision making.

2

Do not delegate authority to the Chief Executive

Ensures that council is given the opportunity to participate in the appeal decision making, but at the cost of potentially major delays with the resolution process.

If an urgent matter arises during the council recess period, there are no measures in place to address it.

 

Council staff’s recommended option is Option 1 - that delegations to make decisions on the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland in relation to appeals before the Environment Court be given to the Chief Executive Officer.

 

 

Considerations

1.     Environmental Impact

The Proposed Regional Plan for Northland is a combined Regional Plan developed under the Resource Management Act 1991 to fulfil the resource management functions of NRC. 

The Plan seeks to manage a range of environmental issues throughout Te Tai Tokerau.  This paper relates to the delegation of powers to make decisions on plan provisions that have been appealed to the Environment Court.  Any decisions made under delegation on plan provision will affect the activities of people and the environment of Northland.

2.     Significance and Engagement

This is a purely administrative matter, hence in relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, is deemed not significant.

However, it is noted that if these measures were not in place and an urgent decision was required during council recess, appeals could not progress.  This would have time and cost implications for council and appeal parties.

3.     Policy, Risk Management and Legislative Compliance

This report complies with Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act in terms of:

Ÿ the ability of a local authority to delegate certain functions; and

Ÿ the ability of a local authority to resolve not to discharge a committee, subcommittee or other subordinate decision-making body following a triennial general election.

   If the resolutions contained within the report are approved by council, it minimises its    exposure to risk.

Being a purely administrative matter, Climate Impact, Community Views, Māori Impact Statement, Financial Implications and Implementation Issues are not applicable.

Tuhinga | Background

The Proposed Regional Plan for Northland (Proposed Plan) is a combined coastal, air quality, water and soil plan for Northland created under the Resource Management Act 1991.  Public hearings were held on the provisions of the Proposed Plan in 2019, with council adopting the recommendations of an independent hearing panel at their meeting in April 2019.  These decisions were the subject of 23 appeals to the Environment Court.

At its meeting on 16 July 2019, council delegated power to make decisions in relation to appeals to one councillor and the Group Manager – Strategy, Governance and Engagement.  This power was limited in scope to decisions that generally aligned with council direction.  Where a potential appeal resolution does not align with council’s earlier direction, decision making power is delegated to councillors Yeoman, Kitchen, Blaikie and Macdonald to make decisions on council’s behalf, except for decisions on appeals relating to the inclusion of provisions for managing genetically modified organisms[9].

Work on resolving appeals to the Proposed Regional Plan is ongoing.  To date approximately ninety percent of appeal points have been resolved (see table 1 below for further detail).  The court has been clear that it expects parties to expediently work towards resolution of the remaining appeals.  Given the existing delegations are to council or delegated councillors, they do not provide for progress on appeals at all during the upcoming council recess.  Following elections, there is a risk that that there may be delays with decisions on Regional Plan appeals under the current delegations while the new council is inducted, and new committees and delegations established. To manage this risk, it is recommended that council delegate the power to make decisions on appeals to the Proposed Regional Plan from the time between the current council leaving until 1 February 2023 to the Chief Executive Officer. Staff consider that there are only two appeal topics where there is a risk of a possible departure from the current direction of council (Outstanding Natural Areas and Significant Bird Areas). To address this matter, staff will be working with council to seek direction on these appeal topics prior to recess commencing.

Table 1. Summary of appeals.

Appeal topic

Subtopic

Status of appeal

Topic 1 - Coastal Activities

Moorings, Anchorage and Marinas

Largely resolved

Aquaculture

Resolved

Dredging, disturbance

and disposal

Largely resolved

Reclamation

Ongoing

Marine pests

Resolved

Vehicles on beaches

Ongoing

Significant Ecological Areas and Significant Bird areas

Ongoing

Topic 2 - Activities in the beds of lakes and rivers

 

Resolved

Topic 3 - Allocation and use of Water

 

Resolved

Topic 4 - Water quantity

 

Resolved

Topic 5 - Water quality

 

Resolved

Topic 6 - Damming and

diversion of water

Damming and diverting

water

Resolved

Land drainage and

flood control

Ongoing

Topic 7 - Discharges to land

and water

 

Resolved

Topic 9 - Land use and

disturbance activities

 

Resolved

Topic 10 - Infrastructure and energy

 

Largely resolved

Topic 11 - Biodiversity and

outstanding natural

features/landscapes

 

Resolved

Topic 12 - Natural hazards

 

Resolved

Topic 13 - Cultural

 

Resolved

Topic 14 - General provisions and plan structure

 

Ongoing

Topic 16 Livestock

Exclusion

 

Resolved

Topic 17 Outstanding natural Landscapes

 

Ongoing

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.5

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Water Resilience Fund - Long Term Plan Year 2 and 3 Allocations

From:

Tony Phipps, Contracted Advisor

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Victoria Harwood, Pou Tiaki Hapori - GM Community Resilience, on 13 September 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

The Northland Regional Council established a Water Resilience Fund in its Long-Term Plan 2021-31.  The Water Resilience Fund provides $500,000 per year to support improving water resilience infrastructure (water tanks and associated treatment and plumbing) for vulnerable communities via grants to community linked providers.

This report recommends Water Resilience Fund grant allocations for 2022-23 and 2023-24 FY.  These recommendations have been made based on the previously adopted project eligibility criteria, advice from the Te Tai Tokerau Water Resilience Working Group and guidance provided by council at the council workshop (17 August 2022) on this matter.

Recommendations are made to allocate the full $500,000 of the 2022-23 Fund budget and at this stage $365,000 of the 2023-24 Fund budget to four water resilience improvement projects, as follows:

·    To Te Roroa Development Group: up to $150,000 in 2022-23 for Kaihu Wai Inu Pai.

·    To Te Kotahitanga E Mahi Kaha Trust: up to $260,000 ($120,000 in 2022-23 and $140,000 in 2023-24) for Waima and Tautoro Community Water Proposal.

·    Te Puna Aroha Putea Whakapapa (Charitable Trust); up to $230,000 in 2022-23 for Otiria Te Kaha o te Wai

·    Te Runanga o Ngāti Hine: up to $225,000 in 2023-24 for Tanks A Lot

 

These projects will provide water infrastructure including water collection and storage tanks, filters and associated plumbing to improve the water resilience and alleviate water poverty for some 100 households spread over 10 water short communities.

 

Recommendations:

1.         That the report ‘Water Resilience Fund - Long Term Plan Year 2 and 3 Allocations’ by Tony Phipps, Contracted Advisor and dated 9 September 2022, be received.

2.         That council approves the Water Resilience Fund grant to Te Roroa Development Group: up to $150,000 in 2022-23 for Kaihu Wai Inu Pai.

3.         That council approves the Water Resilience Fund grant to Te Puna Aroha Putea Whakapapa (Charitable Trust); up to $230,000 in 2022-23 for Otiria Te Kaha o te Wai.

4.         That council approves the Water Resilience Fund grant to Te Kotahitanga E Mahi Kaha Trust: up to $260,000 ($120,000 in 2022-23 and $140,000 in 2023-24) for Waima and Tautoro Community Water Proposal.

5.       That council approves the Water Resilience Fund grant to Te Runanga o Ngāti Hine: up to $225,000 in 2023-24 for Tanks A Lot.

 

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Approve the recommendations for funding allocation for the 2022-2023 and partial funding of 2023-2024 financial years

Projects have been assessed against the criteria and meet all requirements. Projects can start as soon as possible, and water resilience is improved for people in the region

Funding for 2023-2024 is partially allocated, this leaves a smaller amount available for the remainder of 2023-2024 financial year for any new projects.

2

Recommended projects are not approved

water resilience decision making options for a future council will remain

Water resilience projects are delayed for the 2022-2023 year.

Project managers cannot plan their works schedule ahead of funding start dates in 2023-2024

 

The staff’s recommended option is option 1, to approve the recommendations for the 2022-2023 and 2023-2024 financial years to receive water resilience funding.

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

Climate change will potentially further worsen water availability to some communities through drought conditions on top of already poor infrastructure. The need to collect potable water in appropriate volumes is necessary to mitigate the effects of climate change on communities.

Communities have been identified as needing drinking water infrastructure improvements and have available and capable community organisations ready to project manage and undertake improvements ahead of the effects of climate change.

 

2.    Environmental Impact

The projects funded by the Water Resilience Fund grants recommended will significantly improve the water resilience and overall resilience of the recipient communities, reduce their need for emergency water supplies and improve their health and wellbeing.

There are no adverse environmental impacts expected from the recommendations. 

 

3.    Community views

The Water Resilience Fund was established through the Long-Term Plan 2021-31 public process with community views on the Fund proposal and kaupapa being sort and considered by council. The criteria are strongly aligned to the kaupapa of the Fund and the process includes receiving advice from the Te Tai Tokerau Water Resilience Working Group.

 

4.    Māori impact statement

The Water Resilience Fund was widely supported by Māori through the Long-Term Plan process and the most water short predominantly Māori communities will benefit from the Water Resilience Fund grants.  The grant allocation process includes advice from the Te Tai Tokerau Water Resilience Working Group which includes iwi representatives.

The comprehensive allocation of funds across multiple years is to meet the requirements of current applications for planned and ‘ready to go’ water resilience projects. Allocation of funds to these projects gives security and surety to the applicants that projects can go ahead in the relevant funding year.

 

5.    Financial implications

The total of the recommended grants, total $500,000 (100%) of the 2022-23 Fund budget, and $365,000 (73% of the 2023-24 Fund budget, leaving $135,000 (27%) yet unallocated.   

Once the council has made the grants, implementation of the individual water resilience improvement projects is the responsibility of the grantees.  While the grantees have been selected as capable providers there is some risk that these first projects may not be completed within the FY.  It is intended to make grant payments in advance to enable the grantee/providers to purchase tanks and other materials which make up the largest cost components of these projects.

 

6.    Implementation issues

The grants are provided to community organisations, council does not implement the project, monitoring is undertaken by staff to assess the progression of the project and reports are provided half yearly on progress until completion.

 

Council approving all recommended funding applications at this stage will reduce the decision-making opportunities of a future council in respect to water resilience.

 

7.    Significance and engagement

This does not trigger the council significance and engagement policy.

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

The recommendations present no know significant policy or legislation compliance risks for council.  The council is making grants to trustworthy and capable providers based on advice from a regional water resilience working group with wide and specialist representation. Responsibility for the management of operational risks and compliance is with the grantees.  council staff will monitor and report on progress with the projects receiving grants.

 

Background/Tuhinga

The Water Resilience Fund

As part of its response to the severe 2019-20 drought and the lack of water resilience and water poverty exposed, the Northland Regional Council established a Water Resilience Fund in its Long-Term Plan 2021-31.  The Water Resilience Fund provides $500,000 per year to support improving water resilience infrastructure (water tanks and associated treatment and plumbing) for vulnerable communities via grants to community linked providers.

This report recommends Water Resilience Fund grant allocations for 2022-23 and 2023-24 FY.  These recommendations have been made based on the previously adopted project eligibility criteria, advice from the Te Tai Tokerau Water Resilience Working Group and guidance provided by council at the council workshop (17 August 2022) on this matter.

Criteria for Eligible Projects to Receive Water Resilience Fund Grants

The following criteria for eligibility for Water Resilience Fund grants were developed to align with the kaupapa of the Fund and on advice from the Te Tai Tokerau Water Resilience Working Group (TTWRWG:  has mandate to co-ordinate and advise, with representation from iwi, central and local government) and previously adopted by council:

Criteria

1.    The project will substantially improve water resilience of a community including households, that are not on an existing public water supply.

2.    The benefitting community is identified as suffering from chronic water shortages and water poverty, and is housing or serving vulnerable people: elders, Kaumatua and Kuia, supporting unwell or disabled whanau, high number of whanau including tamariki.

3.    Inadequate or poor state of water infrastructure is a primary cause of the water shortages.

4.    Deliverability of solutions including infrastructure (tanks, treatment and associated plumbing).

5.    The project provider (grantee) is trustworthy and capable with strong community links.

 

Process for Identifying and Selecting Projects for Water Resilience Fund

The process for identifying and selection of projects for Water Resilience Fund grants used the above criteria and was based on information and learning from the 2019-20 drought and using the collective knowledge and advice of the Te Tai Tokerau Water Resilience Working Group (TTWRWG) as follows:

1.    Referring to Te Tai Tokerau Water Resilience Working Group for advice and support.

2.    Based on list of potential projects compiled during and following 2019-20 drought response and applying the Criteria for Eligible Projects to Receive Water Resilience Fund Grants.

3.    Identify potential projects and providers* (TTWRWG/NRC).

4.     Seek detailed proposals from potential providers (NRC/provider).

5.    Evaluate (NRC/TTWRWG) and refine projects (NRC/provider).

6.    Allocate and pay grants (NRC).

(*Excluding projects or components of projects with, or more closely aligned to, other funding eg. Puna Wai Ora (Te Hiku), Rural Drinking Water Fund (DIA) and Kainga Rua (TPK).)

Before considering potential projects for grants for years 2 and 3 of the Fund the above process was reviewed including advise from TTWRWG.  The review included the consideration of the merits of adding a public expressions of interest/application process.  The conclusion of the review is that the current process works; with the recruitment of worthy projects appropriate to the scale of the fund, without creating unrealistic expectations, nor a large administration burden.  The advice provided to council was to stick with current process, while improving and adapting based on learnings from experience with the process and projects.

 

 

Water Resilience Fund Grant Allocations for 2022-23 and 2023-24.

Following the above process, it is recommended that Water Resilience Fund grants for 2022-23 and 2023-24 are made to:

Te Roroa Development Group; Kaihu Wai Inu Pai project: up to $150,000 (ex GST).

Project summary:

•     Improving water resilience to 7 Kaihu area homes, benefiting some 26 people.

•     Prioritisation based on Te Roroa knowledge of community and needs.

•     Providing tanks, water treatment and associated plumbing and minor repairs, education and maintenance plans.

•     Provider: Te Roroa Development Group (Ltd), a subsidiary of the Te Roroa mandated Iwi organization, delivers Kaimanaaki and Kaiwhakamana Hauora services, experienced and trusted community services provider with good project management capability and access to contractors.

•     Status: Ready to start and complete in 22/23.

•     Project cost estimate/ NRC Water Resilience Fund application: Total $173,000 (ex GST).

Te Kotahitanga E Mahi Kaha Trust: Waima, Tautoro and Utakura Community Water Proposal: up to $260,000 (ex GST).

Project Summary:

•     Improving water resilience to whanau of three communities; Waima, Utakura, Tautoro; including 30-36 homes.

•     Prioritisation based on local knowledge of and engagement with communities and participation in the 2019-20 drought response.

•     Providing tanks, water treatment and associated plumbing and minor repairs. Based on extending current project, ready to start.

•     Provider: Te Kotahitanga E Mahi Kaha Trust, experienced and trusted community services provider with current WRF water tank project experience and access to contractors.

•     Project cost estimate /NRC Water Resilience Fund application: $260,000 (ex GST).

•     Status: extension of existing project, ready to start, complete over two FY.

Te Puna Aroha Putea Whakapapa (Charitable Trust); Otiria Te Kaha o te Wai; up to $230,000 (ex GST).

Project Summary:

•     Improving water resilience to whanau of Otiria community for 26 homes benefitting some 125 people.

•     Prioritisation based on local knowledge of community and participation in the 2019-20 drought response.

•     Providing tanks, water treatment and associated plumbing and minor repairs.

•     Provider: Te Puna Aroha Putea Whakapapa (Charitable Trust), experienced and trusted community project provider with access to contractors.

•     Project cost estimate /NRC Water Resilience Fund application: $235,000 (ex GST).

•     Status: ready to start, prefer to complete in one FY.

 

Te Rūnaga o Ngāti Hine; Tanks A Lot; up to $225,000 (ex GST).

•     Improving water resilience to some six communities in Ngāti Hine rohe whenua (including Pipiwai/Kaikou, Motutau, Waiomio, Matawaia, Orauta/Ngapipito), including some 80 homes.

•     Prioritisation based on Te Rūnanga O Ngāti Hine connected social services data and knowledge of community.

•     Providing tanks, water treatment and associated plumbing and minor repairs.

•     Provider: Te Rūnanga O Ngāti Hine, in collaboration with Nga Tangariki o Ngati Hine Trust

•     Project cost estimate/ NRC Water Resilience Fund application: Total $600,000 (ex GST), over three FY.

•     Status: to start in spring 2023 and carried out in three tranches over three years.

The recommended grants total $500,000 (100%) of the 2022-23 Fund budget, and $365,000 (73% of the 2023-24 Fund budget, leaving $135,000 (27%) as yet unallocated. 

A further recommendation will be made on the allocation of the remaining amount once any potential timing changes to the funded projects or other projects have been investigated.  This could include bringing forward some of the work currently proposed for 2024-25.

The Te Runanga o Ngati Hine: Tanks A Lot project proposes three phases over three years.  Consideration of WRF grant funding of the second two years will also need to be part of a future recommendation.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.6

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Electric Car Charging Expansion and Vehicle Purchasing Policy

From:

Phil Heatley, Strategic Projects and Facilities Manager and Glen McKenzie, Vehicle Fleet Coordinator

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 21 September 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

This agenda item seeks approval for up to $80,000 + GST of unbudgeted expenditure to be approved to fund the expansion of Water Street Office’s electric vehicle charging capacity. This is required to support one of council’s major climate change response initiatives, being the proactive upgrade of the vehicle fleet to ‘fit for purpose’ lower emission vehicles.

 

This item also recommends that the Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer’s maximum vehicle purchase value match that set by the Renumeration Authority under the Renumeration Authority Act 1977. The Renumeration Authority determination is updated regularly and so future proofs the value setting over time. Also, the determination provides a greater allowance for the purchase of lower emissions vehicles, incentivising the Chairperson and the CEO to have vehicles that are either hybrid or fully electric.

 

Recommendations:

1.         That the report ‘Electric Car Charging Expansion and Vehicle Purchasing Policy ’ by Phil Heatley, Strategic Projects and Facilities Manager and Glen McKenzie, Vehicle Fleet Coordinator and dated 10 September 2022, be received.

2.         That up to $80,000 + GST of unbudgeted capital expenditure is approved to fund the expansion of Water Street Office’s electric vehicle charging capacity.

3.         That, as a variation to council’s Procurement Policy, Hubands Energy be approved as the preferred contractor for the electric vehicle charging expansion

4.         That the purchase policy for the Chairperson’s vehicle, including the maximum vehicle purchase value, is to match the determination set by the Renumeration Authority under the Renumeration Authority Act 1977.

5.         That the maximum purchase value for the Chief Executive Officer’s vehicle is to match the maximum vehicle purchase value for the Chairperson’s vehicle.

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Capital expenditure is approved for electric vehicle charging expansion.

Council can maintain its proactive high-emissions vehicle replacement schedule as a Climate Change response initiative.

 

Council can take advantage of Water Street’s recently expanded solar generation.

 

The new the intelligent chargers have the ability to manage power consumption.

 

The new the intelligent chargers can track our power consumption, assisting in monitoring carbon emissions more accurately.

 

Funds are not available for other capital expenditure items.

 

 

2

Capital expenditure is not approved for electric vehicle charging expansion.

Funds are available for other capital expenditure items.

Council will have to re-evaluate its proactive high-emissions vehicle replacement schedule.

 

Delays council uptake of the beneficial aspects of new intelligent chargers.

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1, to approve capital expenditure for electric vehicle charging expansion.

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

Expanding the electric vehicle charging capacity supports one of council’s major climate change response initiatives, being the upgrade of the vehicle fleet to ‘fit for purpose’ lower emission vehicles. Promoting the purchase of low emissions vehicles, as per the Renumeration Authority determination, also supports this climate change response initiative.

Increased electric vehicles in the fleet will maximise the benefits of Water Street’s recently expanded solar generation.

2.    Environmental Impact

Expanding the electric vehicle charging capacity supports the operation of vehicles which discharge few or no pollutants into the environment. Promoting their purchase of low emissions vehicles, as per the Renumeration Authority determination, also supports this outcome.

3.    Community views

The wider community/ratepayers are not significantly affected with the proposals. There is general public support for practical climate change response initiatives such as upgrading the national vehicle fleet to lower emission vehicles and promoting their purchase, as per the Renumeration Authority determination.

4.    Māori impact statement

The proposal(s) has no specific impact on Māori.

5.    Financial implications

The decision will require the commitment of up to $80,000 of unbudgeted capital expenditure funded from retained earnings and recovered by depreciation over the useful life of the asset.

The maximum purchase value of the Chairperson and CEO’s vehicles will be broadly the same, albeit in future the value will be linked to the Renumeration Authority determination.

6.    Implementation issues

There are no material implementation issues with the proposal(s).

7.    Significance and engagement

These are operational matters not requiring public consultation.

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

There are no material policy or risk issues in the making of these decisions. Rather, it supports a climate change response initiative of both central government and council, being upgrading the national vehicle fleet to lower emission vehicles. Furthermore, the purchase value of the Chairperson and CEO’s vehicle will be linked to the Renumeration Authority determination legislation.

Background/Tuhinga

Electric vehicle charging expansion

As one of our climate change response initiatives, council is committed to upgrading our vehicle fleet to ‘fit for purpose’ lower emission vehicles. The nature of council’s fleet usage and length of staff journeys makes electric vehicles the most practical choice on the market for now. Their use will reduce one of council’s larger carbon emission sources, being the operation of petrol and diesel vehicles within the fleet. Furthermore, by purchasing low emission plug-in hybrid vehicles, as we progressively replace our current diesel SUV fleet, we can take advantage of Water Street’s recently expanded solar generation.

 

The number of vehicles across council, and those supplied by council for partner projects (e.g. Predator Free, Kaipara Moana Restoration), has increased by 8 in only two years. The projected conversion over the next two years involves a further 7 electric or hybrid vehicles. However, to be able to charge the lower emission vehicles council is needing to extend our vehicle charging capacity, both in Water Street HQ’s back carpark and front visitors carpark. Staff also need to allow for electric car charging at the rear of council’s property at 26 Water Street (i.e. Food for Life), providing two power points at the carparks there. By agreement, these parks are primarily for KMR branded hybrid vehicles.

 

If council does not upgrade the charging capability, staff will have to re-evaluate this proactive vehicle replacement schedule.

 

Regional office vehicle charging is being addressed on a case-by-case basis. For example, the Kaipara Service Centre has charging stations for all spaces in its basement carpark.

 

New charging stations will also allow council access to improvements in battery/hybrid technology. Modern chargers can manage power consumption. They can also manage the solar power that is available, spreading it across all the charging stations and drawing it down rapidly when the sun is shining while ‘dialling back’ when office activity demands increase. They have the versatility to charge a wide range of vehicles, increasing charging capacity and speeds. Furthermore, the intelligent chargers will be able to track power consumption, assisting in the monitoring of council carbon emissions.  

 


 

Staff request up to $80,000 + GST of unbudgeted capital expenditure to fund the expansion of Water Street HQ’s electric vehicle charging capacity, as below.                    

 

Rear carpark, 10 chargers on 5 pedestals

$60,800 + GST (quote)

Visitor carpark, 2 swipe access chargers for Chairperson/CEO carparks (ability to add further stations)

  $7,700 + GST (quote)

26 Water Street (behind Food for Life) 2 power points for KMR chargers

  $1,500 + GST (estimate)

Cabling through building (terminal and solar)

  $2,500 + GST (quote)

Preliminary and general (also perhaps bollards, asphalt)

  $7,500 + GST (staff estimate)

TOTAL

$80,000 + GST

 

Hubands Energy (Hubands)

Hubands, a local company, are experts in e-charging and solar installations, it is their specialty. Hubands installed the solar power generation at the Water Street Offices and have also installed several charging stations there. While councils’ Procurement Policy provides that there be a public tender/request for quotes (or minimum three quotes) obtained for a contract of this value, council could select Hubands as the contractor with fair reason:

 

1.    Hubands are familiar with council’s switching system, transformer(s) and office wiring layout given their previous experience expanding the solar array;

2.    Hubands are in the best position to maximise the benefits of drawing from the solar system for e-charging.

3.    Staff could not get any other electrical contractor to quote, following three requests over a period of several months.

 

Staff recommend that Hubands be approved as the preferred contractor for the electric vehicle charging expansion.

 

Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) vehicles

Council’s current Vehicle Policy (July 2021) has vehicle pricing guidelines as follows:

 

The Chairperson and CEO may have a vehicle that costs:

·    Up to $49,853 in the case of a petrol or diesel vehicle (excluding GST and on-road costs); and

·    Up to $58,162 in the case of an electric or hybrid vehicle, after the deduction of any rebate under the clean vehicle discount scheme (excluding GST and on-road costs).

 

This item seeks to change this aspect of the policy by confirming the principle that the Chairperson’s maximum vehicle purchase value is to match the maximum set by the Renumeration Authority under the Renumeration Authority Act 1977. Currently, this value is determined by the Local Government Members (2022/23) Determination 2022, section 9:

 

Sec 9 (2) If a local authority provides a motor vehicle to a mayor or regional council chairperson during the determination term, the maximum purchase price that the local authority may pay for the motor vehicle is:

 

a)    In the case of a petrol or diesel vehicle, $55,000; and

b)    In the case of an electric of hybrid vehicle, $68,500.

 

(Note: The Renumeration Authority values include GST and any on-road costs).

 

While the Renumeration Authority determination is specifically for council’s Chairperson, staff recommend that aligning the CEO’s vehicle value with the determination is logical, providing consistency, clarity and simplicity. Afterall, the current policy aligns the value of both vehicles.

 

Formally recognising the Renumeration Authority values in both circumstances will future proof the value setting over time for both the Chairperson and CEO’s vehicle. Furthermore, the greater allowance both incentivises and clearly signals the preference of council that both the Chairperson and the CEO have a vehicle that is either hybrid or fully electric.

 

While council sets the maximum value and principles of purchase, a council decision is not required for the purchase of a particular vehicle for the CEO. That decision is ‘by agreement’ between the Chairperson and the CEO. Furthermore, it is not intended that the Renumeration Authority determination is referenced for the deduction from salary calculation for the CEO (as is the case for the Chairperson). That decision is ‘by agreement’ between the Chairperson and the CEO as part of employment contract negotiations.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.7

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Minor Amendment to Regional Pest Plan

From:

Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity and Raymond Tana, Biosecurity Specialist - Freshwater Pests

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity, on 21 September 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) have recently declared a species name change for the majority of Koi carp found within New Zealand from Cyprinus carpio (European carp) to Cyprinus rubrofuscus (Asian carp) following a review of the genetic database.  At this stage it is accepted that both European Koi carp and Asian Koi carp are present in New Zealand.

This name change poses several management issues for Northland Regional Council (NRC) regarding the implementation of its Regional Pest and Marine Pathway Management Plan 2017-2027 (hereafter referred to as the Pest Plan).

A minor amendment to the Pest Plan is proposed to ensure any regulations to prevent the spread of both Asian and European Koi carp are lawful.

 

Recommendations:

1.         That the report ‘Minor Amendment to Regional Pest Plan’ by Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity and Raymond Tana, Biosecurity Specialist - Freshwater Pests and dated 14 September 2022, be received.

2.         That council approves a minor amendment to the Pest Plan by council resolution under the Biosecurity Act 1993 section 100(g) (4) to add “Cyprinus rubrofuscus, commonly known as Asian Koi carp” to the Pest Plan where it is appropriate. 

3.         That the council approves a minor amendment to the Pest Plan by council resolution under the Biosecurity Act 1993 section (g) (4) to add the name “European Koi carp” alongside the species name Cyprinus carpio where it is appropriate.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Do not approve the minor amendment to add Cyprinus rubrofuscus, commonly known as Asian Koi carp” to the Pest Plan

and;

add the name “European Koi carp” alongside the species name Cyprinus carpio where it is appropriate.

Nil

The rules in our Pest Plan aimed at preventing the spread of and/or reducing known populations Koi carp become unlawful.

2

Approve the minor amendment to add Cyprinus rubrofuscus, commonly known as Asian Koi carp” to the Pest Plan

and;

add the name “European Koi carp” alongside the species name Cyprinus carpio where it is appropriate.

The rules in the Pest Plan will be in alignment with other regional councils where Koi carp are being managed.

Ensure that any regulatory actions taken to prevent the distribution of both European and Asian Koi carp within Northland are lawful.

Nil

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option two

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

There are no known impacts on climate change anticipated from this minor amendment.

2.    Environmental Impact

No impact

3.    Community views

No community consultation is required as this matter is considered a minor administrative nature.

4.    Māori impact statement

There are no particular impacts on Māori as a consequence of this minor administrative change.

5.    Financial implications

There are no new financial costs associated with council amending the Pest Plan as any amendments will be posted online.

6.    Implementation issues

The amendment in the Pest Plan will align with other regional councils where koi carp are being managed.  Staff are also working the Department of Conservation to update and reissue the licence to harvest Koi carp required for management operations. No impact to the scheduled management activities is predicted.

 

7.    Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because the inclusion of Koi carp in the Pest Plan has previously been consulted on and provided for in council’s Long-Term Plan and is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

 

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

The amendment in the Pest Plan will align with other regional councils where Koi carp are being managed and ensure that any regulatory actions taken to prevent the distribution of both European and Asian Koi carp within Northland are lawful.

 

Background/Tuhinga

Following a review of the genetic database MPI confirmed Koi carp in New Zealand waterways are derived from the Asian lineage (C. rubrofuscus) and not the European lineage (C. carpio) as was previously thought. The name change has resulted in C. rubrofuscus or Asian Koi carp being registered as an “Unwanted Organism” by MPI, meaning that C. rubrofuscus is now subject to the same regulations and restriction of sale and distribution as its original name sake C. carpio or European Koi carp as it is commonly known. At the time of writing MPI have retained European Koi carp on the unwanted organism register and this species may also be present in New Zealand.

Currently only Cyprinus carpio, or European Koi carp is listed as a Progressive containment freshwater pest species in the Pest Plan. As a consequence of the above taxonomic name change, the rules in the Pest Plan concerning koi carp (and as set out below) also require updating and regulations that apply to European Koi carp should also apply to Asian Koi carp. This amendment ensures any regulatory actions taken to prevent the distribution of both European and Asian Koi carp within Northland are lawful.

· Rule 9.3.1 Every person who sees, or suspects the presence of, any containment pest fish species outside the identified locations must immediately report the sighting to Northland Regional Council. Any person who catches containment pest fish species intentionally or accidentally in Northland must destroy them immediately upon capture

· Rule 9.3.2 No person will transport any live or dead progressive containment pest fish species (including spawn and juvenile fish) into or around Northland.

· Rule 9.3.3 No person shall have in their possession any live progressive containment pest fish species (including spawn and juvenile fish) in captivity or for resale purposes in Northland.

The Biosecurity Act 1993 at section 100G (4) allows for minor changes to be made to the Pest Plan by way of council resolution without a review or public consultation.  This is provided the council is satisfied that the change would not have significant effects on any person’s rights or obligations, and it is not inconsistent with a national policy direction.

The addition of Asian Koi carp to the Pest Plan is a minor change that is appropriate for amendment by council resolution as;

a) The addition of C. rubrofuscus is not inconsistent with the National Policy Direction for Pest Management 2015 as it is consistent with the approach that the risks posed to the environment by Koi carp are significant.

b) The recent taxonomic name change of C. carpio to C. rubrofuscus reflects a recent review of the taxonomic classification of the majority of Koi found in New Zealand. It does not carry any new rights or impose obligations on any person and is without significant effect

Operational Impacts

As part of operational management activities, the Northland Regional Council requires a licence to harvest Koi carp. These licences are managed by the Department of Conservation (DoC). We are currently working with DoC to update and reissue our licence to reflect the taxonomic name change. No impact to the scheduled management activities is expected.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 7.8

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

NRC Tiriti Organisational Review (Te Tiriti Health Check)

From:

Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement, on 21 September 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This document acts as a ‘placeholder’ for the report ‘NRC Tiriti Organisational Review (Te Tiriti Health Check)’ which was unable to be completed in time for the circulation of the agenda due to the final report from the independent assessors not being available at time of agenda compilation.

The report will be sent out to members under separate cover.

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 8.1

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Chair's Report to Council

From:

Penny Smart, Chair

Authorised by:

Penny Smart, Chair, on

 

Purpose of Report

This report is to receive information from the Chair on meetings/events attended, and correspondence sent for the month of August 2022.

 

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Chair's Report to Council’ by Penny Smart, Chair and dated 12 September 2022, be received.

 

 

 

Meetings/events attended

During this period, I attended the following meetings/events/functions:

·        MMH Masterplan and strategy launch

·        Northland Forestry Environmental Working Group Meeting

·        MMH & NRC meetings including Director applications/interviews

·        Reforms update - Mayors, Chairs and Chief Executives

·        Mayor Jake Smith's Zoom Meeting for Northland Mayors and Chair

·        Meeting with Department of Conservation, Wellington

·        Regional sector pre-meeting dinner, Wellington

·        Regional sector meeting, Wellington

·        NZ Film Commission discussion

·        RN / NRC Strategic Partnership

·        Northland Mayoral Forum

·        Unpacking Resource Management Reform

Correspondence

During August 2022 I sent out the following correspondence:

Date

Addressed To

Subject

01.08.22

Des Subritzky, Dargaville

Service recognition

25.08.22

Te Waihoroi Shortland (Chair)Tohe Ashby (Chair)Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Hine

Invite - Mana Whakahono ā Rohe Agreement with Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Hine and Ngā Tirairaka o Ngāti Hine Trust

26.08.22

Director-General of the Department of Conservation

Northland Regional Council follow up letter to introduction with yourself as Director General of DOC and Henry as Operations Group DDG DOC

26.08.22

Chair and Chief Executive Officer Marsden Maritime Holdings Limited

Response to business case proposal

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 8.2

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Chief Executive’s Report to Council

From:

Malcolm Nicolson, Tumuaki - Chief Executive Officer

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Malcolm Nicolson, Tumuaki - Chief Executive Officer, on 21 September 2022

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Chief Executive’s Report to Council’ by Malcolm Nicolson, Tumuaki - Chief Executive Officer and dated 31 August 2022, be received.

 

 

8.2.1   Highlights

Valedictory

It is with great pride that I come to the end of my tenure as Chief Executive Officer. I am eternally grateful for the privilege the council has bestowed on me to be able to serve the people of Northland over the past decade in this manner.

The many achievements the organisation has had over this period, have only been possible through the unity and foresight of governance, the passionate commitment of staff and the unswerving loyalty of the communities of the North to improving the lot of all. We hand to the next generation a strengthened relationship with tangata whenua, improved resilience of our communities and greater biodiversity than that which we inherited.

The financial reports contained in the agenda are a pleasing point to hand over, with as clean an Annual Report as could be expected, sound financial performance and a substantially strengthened Balance Sheet for the organisation. While the financial position of council appears to be substantial, I believe that council will be required to commit well in excess of $100M investment into Northland infrastructure requirements to support the continued strength of the Northland economy in the short to medium term, thus making the preservation of the financial and debt raising capacity a critical strategic imperative until there is greater clarity about these investments.

While the current picture looks rosy, we should not underestimate the working that lies ahead of the organisation:

·    We are only commencing the journey of relationship building with tangata whenua and a true expression of partnership under Te Tiriti. I believe the leading-edge work council is undertaking on the development of co-governance models will stand Te Tai Tokerau in good stead in years to come.

·    The impacts of climate change on the region will be significant and will require a fundamental rethink of our social and economic structures within the region. The start of this discussion through the Ngā Taumata o te Moana and Te Tai Tokerau Climate Adaptation Strategy are a solid beginning but these will need to be followed with courageous discussions with our communities and brave leadership.

·    The significant strides we have made to improvement of land-based biodiversity and biosecurity needs to be maintained if these gains are to be preserved and enhanced. The same level of commitment needs to engendered for our freshwater and marine environmental assets.

 

We can at best say we have laid a solid foundation from which future generations can build. So, in wishing Jonathan Gibbard well as our new Chief Executive from the beginning of October, I would encourage him and the in-coming council to preserve and further enhance this organisation commitment to environmental guardianship, resource stewardship and social equity for all the people of Northland.

I would take this opportunity to thank all the elected members, staff and colleagues across local and central government for their support and sound advice over the past ten years.

In the words of the Ariki of Ngati Hine, Te Ruki Kawiti uttered immediately after the battle

of Ruapekapeka in Jan 1846:

“Titiro atu ki ngā taumata ote moana”

Look to the horizons of the ocean – think strategically and maintain a global outlook while

appreciating the ground upon which we stand.

 

8.2.2   CEO’s Office

Current Legal Proceedings

Department

Description

Status

Consent decision appeal

Two separate consent applications for replacement and new consents relating to a proposed expansion of, Doug’s Ōpua Boat Yard in Walls Bay, Ōpua

Environment Court appeal hearing scheduled for week of 21 November 2022.

Consent decision appeal

Irrigation of avocado orchards and horticulture crops

Interim decision issued by the Court on 7 July 2022 stating that the consents could be granted with appropriate conditions.  The Court has requested all parties to file a memorandum, preferably jointly, by 28 October 2022 advising on whether they have reached agreement on the consent.

 

8.2.3   CORPORATE SERVICES

Enterprise System Update

 

Unbudgeted operational expenditure of $65,000 has been approved for work on reviewing

council’s investment strategy. 

 

Fraud Declaration

I am not aware of any fraud nor am I investigating any incidence or suspected incidence of fraud at

this time.

 

Quality Management System (QMS)

Over the past year, Council’s Continuous Improvement Steering Group, with support from ELT, have

been working to review council’s quality management system.  The review discovered that the

system as it was, and accredited under ISO 9001, was not fit for purpose and presented multiple

challenges that were not able to be overcome despite ongoing work and improvement initiatives.  In

acknowledgement of this, the group worked to develop a new council-wide quality management

system, which was successfully trialled across council activities.

 

The new system, ‘Te Huarahi Tika – The Pathway to Achieving our Goals’ has now been approved by

the Executive Leadership Team as the new QMS, replacing ISO 9001.

 

Accordingly, Telarc (Council’s ISO certification auditing body) have now been notified that council will not be proceeding with the ISO recertification process.  References to ISO accreditation have been removed from council’s website.

 

Council Property Update

Good progress on the NIWA Kingfish RAS Project has been made on site in the last month with the equipment installation in progress and shelter frame construction complete (see photo). The shelter fabric installation is now in-train with the roof complete and side-walls pending (see photo). The works within the RAS treatment area (fibreglass, screens, diffusers, UV lights, RAS bridge) are critical to enable commissioning to commence in early October 2022. With the completion targeted for December 2022, the Project Manager is working with the head contractor to ensure slippage into early January 2023 is avoided if at all possible.

 

HR Update

In the last 10 years we have essentially doubled in size (154 staff in 2012 and 296 in 2022).  The CEO has undertaken various restructures to reshape the organisation so that we are more fit for purpose.  The human resources and health and safety delivery has changed significantly, moving from what was more of a transactional approach to one that is more collaborative, inclusive and focused on the wider organisation.  It is now more of a partnership model between managers with specialist assistance when needed. 

 

There has been a greater than ever focus on our culture, performance management, wellbeing, growth and development of staff, improved use of our network of managers and flexibility of working arrangements, which has been achieved through the leadership of HR working closely with a range of staff through the likes of our OD Group, Wellbeing Group and H&S Committee to gain better uptake and implementation of our HR and H&S strategies across the organisation.  We have also been working to ensure that we have diversity of our people throughout the organisation including management.  Although initial discussions have been had as it relates to all things HR, moving forward we will have more emphasis on ensuring our obligations under Te Tiriti are being met.

 

 

8.2.4   regulatory services

Consents in Process

During August 2022, a total of 226 Decisions were issued.  These decisions comprised:

Ÿ Moorings

3

Ÿ Coastal Permits

38

Ÿ Air Discharge Permits

2

Ÿ Land Discharge Permits

25

Ÿ Land Use Consents

116

Ÿ Water Permits

30

Ÿ Water Takes

4

Ÿ Bore Consents

8

 

The processing timeframes for the August 2022 consents ranged from:

Ÿ 319 to 5 calendar days, with the median time being 119 days;

Ÿ 118 to 3 working days, with the median time being 79 days.

 

Forty-seven applications were received in August 2022.

Of the 124 applications in progress at the end of August 2022:

Ÿ 38 were received more than 12 months ago;

Reasons for being more than 12 months old:

-    Awaiting additional information (including CIAs)

9

-    Consultation with affected parties/stakeholders

7

-    On-hold pending new rules becoming operative

6

-    Other

16

Ÿ 18 were received between 6 and 12 months ago (most awaiting further information from the applicant);

Ÿ 68 less than 6 months.

 

Appointment of Hearing Commissioners

The following commissioner was appointed in August 2022 for one consent hearing:

·    Ms Sarah Shaw as Sole Commissioner for consents associated with earthworks for a canal development.  The hearing is scheduled for 28 September 2022.

 

Consents Decisions and Progress on Notified Applications in Process, Objections and Appeals

The current level of notified application processing activities at the end of August 2022 is (by number):

Ÿ Progress on Applications Previously Notified

7

Ÿ Appeals/Objections

2

 

COMPLIANCE MONITORING

The results of compliance monitoring for the period 1 – 31 August 2022 (and year-to-date figures) are summarised in the following table and discussed below.

Classification

Total

Full compliance

Low risk non-compliance

Moderate non-compliance

Significant non-compliance

Not exercised during period

Air Discharge

13

12

0

1

0

0

Bore Consent

27

26

1

0

0

0

Coastal Discharge

34

29

1

4

0

0

Coastal Permit

65

48

11

1

0

5

FDE – Discharge permit

80

65

0

8

0

7

FDE – Permitted activity

42

39

0

2

1

0

Land Discharge

62

45

6

9

0

2

Land Use Consent

46

43

3

0

0

0

Water Discharge

58

38

4

16

0

0

Water Permit

38

35

3

0

0

0

Water Take

245

141

69

18

0

17

Total

710

521

98

59

1

31

Percentage

 

73.4%

13.8%

8.3%

0.1%

4.4%

Year to date

1113

808

150

81

3

71

Percentage

 

72.6%

13.5%

7.3%

0.3%

6.4%

Coastal

Coastal structure permit monitoring in the Bay of Islands continued. There was also further enforcement action from the annual marine farm inspections, including the issuing of abatement and infringement notices, for non-compliances with consent conditions. 

Water, Waste, Air and Land Use (WWALU) Compliance Monitoring

Ÿ Contaminated Land Management

Six incidents involving the discharge of hazardous substances and 21 enquiries regarding contaminated land were received and responded to. No hazardous waste was disposed of at the amnesty day, and nine sites were added to the Selected Land-Use Register.

·   Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants 

WWTP/Consent Status

Issues (August 2022)

Enforcement Action/Response

Far North District

Ahipara

Expires 2033

Ongoing non-compliance with bacteriological consent limits

Under AN

FNDC investigating land disposal options; UV system to be installed in 2022/2023 to reduce bacteriological concentrations

Hihi

Expires 2022

No recent issues

None currently

Kaeo

Expires 31 October 2022; replacement consent application has been received

No recent issues

None currently

Kaikohe

Expired 2021 (replacement consent application on hold)

Intermittent non-compliances with ADW flow, ammonia and bacteriological consent limits

None currently

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent

Kaitāia

Expired 2021; replacement consent application in progress

No recent issues

Under AN (reticulation overflows)

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent

Kawakawa

Expires 2036

No recent issues

None currently

Kerikeri

Expires 2036

No recent issues

 

None currently

Kohukohu

Expired 2016; replacement consent application publicly notified 10 August 2022 - 21 submissions received

Occasional issues with bacteriological conditions of consent

None currently

Opononi & Omāpere

Expired 2019; replacement consent application on hold

Non-compliances with bacteriological consent limits

 

Under AN

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent

Paihia

Expires 2034

Plant upgraded 2019; alkalinity issues preventing optimal ammonia treatment

None currently

Alkalinity improvement project still in progress (to optimise ammonia treatment)

Rangiputa

Expires 2032

No recent issues

None currently

Rāwene

Expires 2023

System overdue for de-sludging

None currently

Russell

Expires 2024

Occasional non-compliances with E. coli consent limit post UV

Under AN

Infringement notices issued January 2022 and June 2022

Improvements underway

Taipā

Expires 2029

No recent issues

None currently

Whatuwhiwhi

Expires 2025

Elevated TSS levels (consent limit may be unnecessarily restrictive).

FNDC to seek consent variation to address TSS levels

Under AN for odour from Tokerau Beach pump station

 

Whangarei District

Hikurangi

Expires 2025

Intermittent issues with plant performance

Plant performance being reviewed to identify improvements

Ngunguru

Expires 2035

No recent issues

None currently

Oakura

Expires 2025

Occasional spikes in E. coli

None currently

Portland

Expires 2024

No recent issues

None currently

Ruakaka

Expires 2046

No recent issues

None currently

Tutukaka

Expires 2024

No recent issues

None currently

Waiōtira

Expires 2030

No recent issues

None currently

Waipū

Expires 2030

No recent issues

None currently

Whāngārei City

Expires 2022; replacement consent application publicly notified – six submissions received and being responded to

No recent issues

Under AN for odour from plant

Kaipara District

Dargaville

Expired 30 June 2022; replacement consent application has been received

Non-compliances with WQ discharge volume consent limits

Under AN

Glinks Gully

Expires 2024

No recent issues

None currently

Kaiwaka

Expires 31 October 2022; replacement consent application has been received

No recent issues

None currently

Mangawhai

Expires 2042

Odour complaints and occasional exceedances of TDS consent limit

Under AN

Maungaturoto

Expires 2032

Intermittent non-compliances, generally due to high rainfall

Under AN

Te Kopuru

Expires 2044

Intermittent minor non-compliances

None currently

Environmental Incidents

No environmental incidents closed in August resulted in a significant environmental impact.

ENFORCEMENT

Abatement Notices, Infringement Notices and Formal Warnings

The following is a summary of the abatement and infringement notices issued:

Action Type

Number

Abatement Notice

11

Infringement Notice

6

 

 

Farm dairy effluent (FDE) monitoring

FDE inspections commenced on 22 July 2022.  NRC staff and the FDE contractor will be visiting a total of 753 farms this monitoring season (four less than last year).  To date approximately 22% of farms have been visited and reported on.  Comparisons of this season’s results so far with those for last season are given in the tables below.

 

Consented farms (571 to do)

Full Compliance

Moderate Non-Compliance

Significant Non-Compliance

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

90

125

21

22

0

2

81%

84%

19%

15%

0%

1%

 

Non-consented farms (182 to do)

Full Compliance

Moderate Non-Compliance

Significant Non-Compliance

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

50

48

3

11

3

1

89%

80%

5.5%

18%

5.5%

2%

 

Other Enforcement

·      Open burning on industrial/trade property – Whangārei

Two charges were laid against an individual for open burning on industrial/trade premises; the burnt items included prohibited items. The Judge convicted the defendant on both charges. The defendant then applied for discharge without conviction. Sentencing took place on 15 September 2022 and the presiding judge convicted the defendant and fined him $15,520 of which we get 90% ($13,968).

·      Breach of enforcement orders - Kaitaia

An individual did not complete the work required by enforcement orders issued on 6 November 2020. The enforcement orders included remedial work on a contaminated land which also required a resource consent. On 28 June 2022, a charging document was filed to court for prosecution for the breach of enforcement orders. In August 2022, the defendant appointed a contaminated land expert to finalise the resource consent application. They have advised that the application shall be lodged soon.

·      Earthworks & vegetation clearance within a wetland – Teal Bay

Charges were laid in the Whangarei District Court on 7 December 2021 against four parties for offences relating to earthworks, vegetation clearance and discharge of sediment that occurred in December 2020. A joint memorandum was signed on 28 June 2022 regarding one issue - whether the wetland is a natural wetland or a constructed wetland. This issue is relevant for some of the charges. NRC expert evidence was filed by 15 July 2022 and the defendants’ expert evidence was to be filed by 25 August 2022. The defendants have failed to file their expert evidence by the deadline. The next appearance date is 18 October 2022.

 

·      Farm dairy effluent - Hikurangi

On 27 June 2022, charges were laid in Whangarei District Court against four defendants for offences relating to the discharge of farm wastewater that occurred in November 2021. First appearance date has been adjourned to 18 October 2022.

·      Discharge of contaminated water to stormwater - Whangarei

On 14 July 2022, four charges were laid in Whangarei District Court against one defendant for offences relating to the discharge of contaminated water to stormwater that occurred in September 2021. First appearance date is 18 October 2022

 

8.2.5   ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

LAND MANAGEMENT

Sustainable Hill Country and Regional Priorities

Staff are working towards the delivery of objectives for the final year of the programme.  A key focus will be working towards the soil conservation plan target 2022-2023 of either 136 plans or a total of 34,030 ha covered by completed plans.  3 soil conservation plans have been completed covering 296ha to date, with 10 covering 1224ha in progress.

 

Poplar and Willow nursery

As reported in July, work is underway to improve the productive capability of the nursery, which included the propagation of new poplar cultivars as containerised cuttings to supplement our pole, stake and wand supply.  A parallel research programme is supporting nursery operations by diversifying our planting stock and field-testing new cultivars and planting methods.

 

Environment fund progress

Staff are preparing grant applications ready for approval late September. Staff are also working on criteria and processes for the new Community Fund, with the aim of ensuring a streamlined process is up and running to enable effective delivery of the fund by the 23/24 financial year.

 

Whangārei urban awa project

A mailout was sent to appropriate landowners in the Otaika catchment, as approved by the recent MFE deed variation.  So far over 30 responses have been received, of which 29 are suitable for follow up.  The team is busy working with fencing contractors to get quotes ready for fencing to get underway once ground conditions are dry enough.

 

The last of the planting projects for this year are currently being completed.

 

Waimā Waitai Waiora partnership

The partnership is currently completing its final season of planting with 70,000 native plants expected to be distributed to seven planting sites.  The partnership has been successful at engaging with Māori with five of the seven planting sites being Māori owned whenua.  This successful engagement has been created through utilising the partnership’s Mana Enhancing Agreement to instil the partnership’s values to Council staff which influences the manner that staff engage and work alongside landowners.

 

Waimā Waitai Waiora partnership staff off-loading native plants at Awarua

 

 BIODIVERSITY

 

FIF Dune Lakes Project

Objective

Status

Aquatic weed and pest fish control

Staff responded to the Environmental Protection Agency Letter of Inquiry in relation to the accidental damage to wetland vegetation at Lakes Tutaki and Mt Camel North.  Lake Tutaki was visited during the annual lakes ecological survey, no hornwort was found in the lake during snorkel surveys and the wetland damaged during the herbicide operation is showing signs of a full recovery.  Planning is underway to control hornwort in Lake Karaka in October.  Dive surveys are underway to see if the lakes treated in March need further treatment in October.

Sediment and nutrient mitigation

Feasibility study is complete.  Awaiting engineers estimate to know if the project can go ahead due to budget constraints. 

Education Days

The last two FIF Dune Lake Education days are planned for September 8 and 15 at Ruakākā and Kai Iwi. 

Ministry for the Environment reporting

The Year 5 Annual Report and payment and Year 6 Annual Work Programme have been supplied to MfE.

 

Lakes Ecological Survey

Nine lakes were visited during the week of 8-13 August with a crew from NIWA.  No oxygen weed (Lagarosiphon major) was found in Lake Ngatu, so we are one year closer to being able to declare eradication of the weed.  Good populations of the rare native plant Trithuria inconspicua were found at Lake Ngatu.  Hornwort has increased in Lake Karaka and is due for control in October.  Hornwort was not found in any other lakes.  NIWA will provide full reports by early November. 

 

A person holding a fish

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NIWA staff with a rake full of hornwort in Lake Karaka during the Lakes Ecological Survey in August.  The weed is programmed for control in October.

 

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The Critically Endangered plant Trithuria inconspicua was found on all transects at Lake Ngatu.

 

 

 

CoastCare

August has been busy for CoastCare with a lot of planting events. 

·    Planting days were held at Ruakaka wildlife refuge and reserve with Bream Bay Coastal Care Trust, volunteers and contractors.  Over 3000 native dune plants, including spinifex, pingao, wiwi and sand coprosma were planted as part of restoring the natural dune ecosystem of the area.  Extensive plant and animal pest control has been undertaken in this area, focused on the invasive coastal wattle, and animal pests including rabbits, stoats and rats. 

·    At Langs Beach the next stage of reshaping and planting was done as part of a project to gradually replace the eroding kikuyu bank with an active dune, albeit narrow due to the constraints of the road being very close to the beach.

·    Oruaiti School's Rōpū Ngaio have been working on dune and dotterel protection at Taupo Bay, with CoastCare support.  In August spinifex and pingao were planted on the sandspit and a new sign, designed by the students was printed and put up at the beach.

·    Two planting days were held at Matapouri.  North of Morrison Road a working bee was held with DOC, Te Whanau a Rangiwhakaahu Hapū, WSP and residents.  An area of degraded dune was weeded, planted with natives and fenced off to protect it.  Ngunguru School continued the great job they have been doing with weeding and planting in Te Wairoa Reserve and on the sandspit.

·    Dune planting also took place at Long Beach Russell, Patauau North, Paraparea Bay, Glinks Gully and Baylys Beach.

·    We have a new staff member who will be working in particular on further developing iwi and hapū relationships with CoastCare and on facilitating expanding kaitiaki ranger programmes.

·    The new staff member was recently involved in Taipa Area weeding and planting days that hosted over 4 days along the Taipa area foreshore. This work included working alongside the tamariki from the Taipa area early childhood centres, Primary and Intermediate schools and a number of volunteers. An enormous effort was made by all and the result shows what can be achieved when we all work together as one.

  

Wetlands

Staff attended a site visit to the Hikurangi repo and hui with the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, Simon Upton.  This was the initial scoping visit for the PCE Integrated Landscape modelling project involving the Northland case study, the Northern Wairoa catchment.

 

Natural Resources

Coastal/Water Quality Operations

 

The quarterly Litter Intelligence survey was undertaken at our Hātea and Onerahi sites.  332 items (mainly unidentified hard and soft plastic fragments) were found.  At Onerahi 255 items were collected; the majority was foamed plastic.  A slight increase of litter items was observed compared to the last quarter’s surveys (296 and 161 respectively).  The August survey followed a period of prolonged rainfall.

 

Continuous dissolved oxygen data logger chains were fabricated for all water quality lakes and a number have been installed following discussion with landowners and tangata whenua.  The remaining will be deployed following consultation.  These devices will greatly increase our understanding of lake processes and ecosystem health, increasing from 12 data points a year to around 33,000.

 

Natural Resources Science

Air quality

A technical report was prepared providing evidence that the PM10 exceedance on
25 May 2022 at council’s Mairtown air monitoring site was the direct result of illegal vegetation burning at Paranui Valley Road between 24 and 26 May 2022.  This report was part of an application to the Minister for the Environment to consider that the exceedance on 25 May 2022 was an exceptional circumstance.  The Air Report, along with a covering letter, has been sent to the Minister.

 

No breach of air quality standard for PM10 and PM2.5 has occurred in July 2022.

 

Freshwater ecology

Nationally threatened mayfly, Zephlebia aff. pirongia sp. 1 has been identified at multiple streams in Whangārei using eDNA samples taken by Water Quality Operations, Biodiversity, and Science teams.

 

Freshwater quality

Works related to LiDAR based high resolution digital river network (DRN) model for Northland are showing good progress.  The GIS deliverables for the Northern Wairoa catchment have been shared with the Kaipara Moana Remediation (KMR) project team and Auckland Council for its use in the KMR modelling.  The final report is due by February 2023.

 

Natural Resources Data

The annual refresh for the LAWA water quality modules is now complete and the new data will be displayed on LAWA from late September.

 

Hydrology

 

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Rainfall

·   North-western and north-eastern areas of Northland received well over the typical (median) August rainfall totals, the wider Bay of Islands area being the highest at about 200% of normal.

·   Mid to northern central areas received close to typical rainfall totals for the month, with Kaikohe recording 90% of typical.

·   Most southern areas experienced lower than typical rainfall (except the Poutō peninsular). Mangawhai received only 53% of typical August rainfall.

 

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Winter Rainfall

·   There was significant regional variation in rainfall across the Northland region during the winter months.

·   North-eastern areas received well over the expected winter rainfall, with the highest at Oromahoe (Waitangi at McDonald Road) being 210% of normal.

·   South-western areas received less, with the lowest at Tutāmoe with 83% of normal winter rainfall.

 

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Rivers

·   Most river catchments along eastern Northland had normal to above normal flow for the month.

·   Most western and central river catchments had below normal flow for the month.

 

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Groundwater

·   Groundwater levels in all monitored aquifers were above normal for August, except Ruawai, which was normal.

 

POLICY AND PLANNING

Freshwater Plan

The Primary Sector Liaison Group (PSLG) had a full-day workshop with an external facilitator on 16 August 2022 to further develop their feedback on NRC’s freshwater plan change framework.  A draft of their report will be presented at the next PSLG meeting in September.

 

NRC is developing a programme of internal workshops to develop a working draft of the freshwater plan change.  The draft is to be workshopped with Council and TTMAC (scheduled for next year) as part of its development before going out for public consultation.

 

NRC commissioned NIWA to model some additional freshwater mitigation scenarios to support the freshwater plan change process.  A final report has been received and is currently being checked by staff.  It will be made available to the two advisory groups and key stakeholders under the same non-disclosure agreements covering the initial reports.

 

The Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group’s (TWWAG) advice on how council might engage with tangata whenua on the freshwater plan change was endorsed by TTMAC at its August meeting. TWWAG also held a wananga on 19 and 20 August at Ngāraratunua marae, where presentations from Te Mana o Te Wai project teams and korero from tohunga provided valuable input to TWWAG’s discussions on their recommendations to council on the freshwater plan change.

 

National Initiatives

Consultation on changes to the National Environmental Standards for Freshwater (NES-F):

The Ministry for the Environment released a discussion document outlining potential changes to the wetland regulations of the (NES-F).  The consultation is focused on the application of the NES-F natural wetland regulations to the coastal marine area.  Council lodged a submission stating a strong preference that the NES-F wetlands regulations should not apply in the coastal marine area.  The submission was approved under delegated authority as the consultation timeframe did not allow for consideration at a formal council meeting. 

 

Proposed Regional Plan Appeals

Staff continue to work to resolve the remaining appeals on the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland. Key points arising since the last report include:

·   Topic 15 Mangrove Removal – final decision of the Environment Court was recieved 18 August. Overall the Court generally found in favour of the package of provisions supported by council. Parties had until 8 September to appeal this decision to the High Court. No appeals have been lodged

·   Topic 14 Fishing Control –  Hearings on this topic have concluded and parties are awaiting an interim decision from the Environment Court . 

·   Plan updates – The Proposed Regional Plan has been updated to reflect recent direction of the Environemnt Court on eathworks, land preparation and  livestock exclusion.  Another update will be rolled out in September to reflect decisions on Aquaculture, Mangrove Removal and Dredging in the Coastal Marine Area.

 

Proposed Far North District Plan and Kaipara Draft District Plan

Far North and Kaipara District Council’s have recently released their Proposed and Draft District Plans for public submission / comment.  A workshop has been held with councillors to discuss the content and provide guidance to staff on matters to include in NRC’s input.  These submissions are currrently being prepared and will be lodged under delegated authority by the Planning and Policy Manager.  Copies of the submissions will be circulated to councillors and TTMAC.

 

8.2.6   BIOSECURITY

Biosecurity staff attended the New Zealand Biosecurity Institute Conference in Christchurch between 02 and 05 August. The theme was Changing Landscapes and it was a great chance to connect and share progress and new research with biosecurity practitioners from around the country kanohi ki te kanohi for the first time in a couple of years. The next national conference will be hosted in Northland in 2023 and we are looking forward to celebrating our strong regional biosecuity collaborations.

 

INCURSIONS

WILD ANIMAL CONTROL - Deer

Several successful operational activities were undertaken during the month of August targeting feral deer.

·    Five red deer of mixed age and sex were culled during August at Mangonui.  These animals were from a wild herd established from a farm outbreak three years ago. Significantly three of the animals were mature hinds and in fawn indicating an established healthy wild breeding herd. None of these animals had ear tags. This successful operation was a result of putting in place a managed plan to target these animals and allocating the required contractor hours to support operations.

 

·    A mature fallow hind was also culled, and this lone hind had been seen periodically over the last two years and was finally located after some good intelligence gathering by the team. This combined contractor- staff operation used a combination of methodologies being with a thermal night vision camera on a drone guiding the ground hunter and indicator dog to the specific location.

 



 

WILD ANIMAL CONTROL – Feral Pigs

·    Early reports from the public indicate a spike in feral pig numbers for this year. All Northland Regional Council (NRC) pig traps are out on loan with some catching well.  The trial with landowners utilising collapsible cages has been very successful, with more to be ordered.   

 

FRESHWATER PESTS

The annual work plan for 2022-2023 has been completed for operational fieldwork including grass carp and tench removal, and koi carp presence/absence surveillance outside the containment zones around Northland.  

 

 

KAURI PROTECTION

Key tasks completed the month included workshops, interagency relations, Tiakina Kauri meetings, and landowner visits relating to fencing.  Highlights included:

§ First workshop for the financial year with North Tec pest animal group

§ Staff attended plant pass workshop as part of the new NPMP rule relating to nursery standards

§ Staff also attended a Tiakina Kauri roles and responsibilities meeting for the new rules

inductions of new team member

 

PARTNERSHIPS

Northland Regional Council – Kiwi Coast partnership

Over the last month Kiwi Coast Trust has been focussed on administrative tasks to complete the last financial year and planning the operations of the upcoming financial year. This included prioritising Kiwi Coast Co-ordinator work streams and planning the key operations and events for the year, including a Northland Kiwi Hui for 02 October in collaboration with Save the Kiwi Trust, the summer series of public events such as the various A+P shows and early discussions for upcoming kiwi and pāteke translocations and releases. Kiwi Coast were also proud to support Mangawhai School’s Photography Competition and sponsor prizes for the winners:

 

Kiwi Link High Value Area

The inaugural Kiwi Link High Value Area (HVA) steering group meeting was held in August, with Kiwi Coast confirmed in a coordinating role, and a representative from Kohinui Stream Landcare appointed as Secretary. The budget for the financial year was confirmed and key operational and monitoring tasks were planned and scheduled.

 

All regular predator control work was completed, with some pleasing catches of feral cats and large adult mustelids across the Kiwi Link network. Due to the prolonged rains and series of storms, trapping contractors took extra health and safety precautions to keep themselves safe and no accidents or incidents occurred despite the wet, slippery conditions. Annual late-winter possum and rat knockdowns have been delayed due to the weather but are poised to be implemented shortly once the weather clears.

 

The focus weed of the month for control was Taiwan Cherry, their bright pink flowers identifying new hotspots and an opportunity for “Weed Action” groups to eradicate them before the seeds are viable and spread to new sites.

Taiwan cherry in full bloom

 

Whangārei Heads High Value Area

This month saw a fantastic weed control collaboration on the slopes of Mount Manaia. Weed Action Whangarei Heads obtained funding from the Whangarei District Council, and in partnership with Aki Tai Here, a local hapū based weed and pest team used the funding to undertake an impressive amount of weed control work in a highly invaded part of this significant maunga.  The effort also doubled as a great training opportunity for Northtec students and members of Ngatiwai’s Kauriora team, extra hours were able to be undertaken, and skills and knowledge shared. Over 500 weed control hours will be spent on the Manaia by the completion of the project.

Aki Tai Here and Weed Action Coordinator Mike Ulrich with members of Kauriora, Manaia Forest Care and students from Northtec preparing to tackle weeds on the slopes of Manaia.

 

Tutukaka High Value Area

Predator control

Predator trapping continued as normal with monthly checks during July-August, baited with whole eggs and/or rabbit. The total catch of cats and mustelids for the two months July-August was 23; 17 of which were caught in Tutukaka Landcare and Rayonnier (forestry) projects. Rat catches are now at 66 per cent of the long-term mean. A pair of pigs at Riverlands have been sighted for about five weeks and attempts are being made to trap them. Double Tap (possum bait) will be laid in the Crawford Reserve bait stations within the next 2 or 3 weeks and the KiwiSaver (1080) operation is progressing well, with the first round of Feratox (cyanide) prefeed put out last month. The uptake has been great, and the possum knockdown has been successful. However, there was pig interference at the stations, so hunting dogs have been put through the operation area during the month. The group intend to keep the pressure on the pigs to push them out of the operation area until the toxin is deployed.

 

Biodiversity and kiwi monitoring

Kākā are continuing to be seen regularly at Tutukaka – with groups of up to six at a time, often squawking and whistling loudly.  Tutukaka Landcare Coalition (TLC) have been keeping pests at low numbers for over two decades now and the increased presence of kākā most likely visiting from offshore islands may indicate the habitat is more favourable for them to nest and breed on the mainland.

 

Species enhancement

Enhancing kiwi recruitment with Operation Nest egg (ONE) continues with monitoring of birds that have transmitters as part of community Pest Plans. Tracking of three of the birds released in April 2021 around the Tutukaka coast continues and their movements are described below...

 

A male kiwi called Awanui has now been sitting for 44 days in a valley on Blue Water Heights in Matapouri and with the assistance of the Ngunguru School interns (Figure 1) his general location was identified. Thanks to community initiatives we have two trail cameras on the nest and some great footage has been obtained, showing both Awanui, and we presume his attentive girlfriend.

 

A male kiwi named Mango has been in the forest adjacent to the top of the Tutukaka Quarry.  His transmitter has switched to mortality mode however the terrain is safe, this is most likely because the transmitter has come off rather than the kiwi has been injured or has died.  It is planned to search and locate Mango during September.  Searching at the eastern end of Horseshoe Bay has also found the third transmitted kiwi called Kotahi which was still active.

 

Advocacy

The group coordinated with the year-seven interns from Ngunguru school to assist with locating the re-introduced kiwi Awanui. This was a great hands-on experience for the interns in an activity engaged directly with our kiwi population.

 

TLC’s education project interns from Ngunguru School assisting with locating Awanui, the re-introduced kiwi, via his radio transmitter at Blue Water Heights, as part of the Enhancing kiwi with the Operation Nest Egg project.

 

 

Piroa Brynderwyn (PLB) High Value Area

PBL has teamed up with Waipū community groups  “About Terns” and Kiwi North to develop packages of curriculum- based activities that can be undertaken in the classroom, on the beach, in the bush and on school camps. Learning is led by qualified teachers with a raft of experience working with conservation and community-based volunteer groups. The group recognise the importance of raising awareness and understanding among young people and involving them in conservation projects.




PBl have also recently worked with the Mangawhai Beach School and Mangawhai Nature School to establish a rat trapping programme for their grounds and with the Waipu Surf Club Rookie Camp where the focus was on shorebirds and dune planting as well as trapping.

 

Mid North High Value Area

A Toxin Plan for Puketōtara across several private landowners is nearing completion and will soon be submitted for approval.  A successful “Trap NZ” workshop was run as well as Controlled Substances License (CSL) training section for those in the area who are either applying for or about to renew their CSL.

 

Western Northland Pest Control

Maunganui Bluff, Te Toa Whenua, Native Forest Restoration Trust, Waipoua Forest Trust, Wekaweka and Pupurangi CPCA’s are doing the operational planning for toxin operations through their bait station networks with a first pulse of toxin to go out in September. 

 

Data analysis of the kiwi listening acoustic devices that were put out as part of the baseline monitoring for the Kohaututaka Otaua project has been completed.  Kiwi (including a pair) were detected at only one of the eight sites.  Kiwi recovery is needed, and this result provides baseline information about the current distribution of kiwi in their project area and will contribute towards future decision making about priority areas for pest control. 

 

PREDATOR FREE

Predator Free Whangārei

August saw a wide range of engagement activities to help build and strengthen relationships. With the visit of newly appointed CE of PF2050 Ltd, Rob Forlong.  A hui was held with community groups and Predator Free 2050 Limited in both Whangārei and Pēwhairangi Whānui.  

 

The Predator Free Whangārei team is currently reviewing its governance structure to ensure our treaty partners particularly hapū are represented into the future.   

 

For Pēwhairangi Whānui, ongoing hui are held to finalise the eradication plans and governance structures for each respective peninsula.

 

Predator Free Whangārei

·    Continuous servicing of bait stations and traps from field team.

·    A Dog Advisory Group was established to be able to consult with community on the best way to approach the possum dog methodology at Whangārei heads.

·    The Whangārei project welcomed onboard Aki Tai Here, a mana whenua working group based at Pataua who will be working with our field team over the next 3 months to gain skills and experience in the eradication space, and to also share their knowledge of matauranga maori.

·    Parua Bay School and Whangārei Heads welcomed our team into their schools to kick start the Guardians on the Lookout programme, a interactive education programme in which students are monitoring their local environments using trail cameras and lure devices.

·    Predator Free Whangārei was involved with Enviroschools’ event Project Pest Control, held at Kiwi North.

 

Predator Free Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands)

Predator Free 2050 Pēwhairangi Whānui (Covers three projects)

The first collective hui between all project partners from each peninsula was held successfully at The Landing. This was a meaningful way for each group to meet all key project partners involved in the development and implementation of the PF2050 Pēwhairangi Whānui kaupapa.  It was also a good opportunity to meet kanohi ki te kanohi with PF2050 Ltd.

 

PF2050 Kororāreka (delivered by Russell Landcare Trust (RLT))

PF2050 Kororāreka under RLT has recently contracted new Project Manager, Ken Thwaites. They are developing Methodologies and the Eradication Plan 1st year roll out plan. The Eradication Plan is still yet to identify the importance of working with mana whenua, this is currently being agreed upon. RLT continue to develop the Trap Infrastructure of trap lines.

 

PF2050 Rakaumangamanga (delivered by 3B2 Ahu Whenua Trust)

3B2 Ahu Whenua Trust are still ongoing with engaging with hapū and local trappers to pull together the Eradication Plan. Input from local trappers has been of huge value with regards to how the eradication is being shaped.

 

PF2050 Mataroa (Purerua) (delivered by Ngāti Rēhia, Ngāti Torēhina, Kiwi Coast)

Ngāti Torēhina requests the name of the peninsula to be changed from Purerua to Mataroa, the historically correct name of the rohe, which we are working towards getting honored and changed for this Predator Free 2050 project. Ngāti Rēhia are developing their hapū plan in support of the overall eradication plan. This still needs to be tabled at the next Governance meeting planned for the end of the month. Ngāti Torēhina and Kiwi Coast Trust will be working collaboratively to deliver the eradication plan.

 

Predator Free 2050 Pēwhairangi Whānui

Met with Eastern Bay Society who has asked for financial support for their work in suppressing Norway rats in the Southwestern area of Rakaumangamanga. This area is in the Eradication Zone for the PF2050 Rakaumangamanga kaupapa. The projected financial cost is $5000.00 annually. It is envisaged that this funding will come from the PF2050 Rakaumangamanga budget.

 

 

MARINE BIOSECURITY

Hull surveillance

This month saw the formal start of the marine biosecurity surveillance season slightly earlier than previous years. Staff directed dive contractors to inspect all hulls in Houhora after a weak positive signal of fanworm was detected in an eDNA sample taken by staff during an educational event a month earlier.


Divers surveyed all 29 vessels present and found three individual fanworm on a commercial fishing vessel. Apart from the three fanworm, the vessel was otherwise clean and without this pest present would have been compliant to travel. Staff directed divers to carefully remove the fanworm thus mitigating the risk. Subsequent analysis of the fanworm revealed that there was two males and one female. The size of the female and histological analysis confirmed that while it had a significant number of eggs it was still immature and had not achieved a size where it was reproductively viable.


The vessel owner was contacted, and the vessel traced back to having spent time in Auckland where it had likely picked up the unwanted hitchhikers. In this instance, the vessel owner had maintained the hull to a high standard, however, the application of the antifouling coating was inadequate in a niche area of the vessel. Situations like this highlight the need for industry antifouling and cleaning standards. Staff will continue to work with the Ministries and the Top of the North partners to facilitate the creation of these standards.

 

Staff have been engaging with Ngāti Kuri’s taiao team who are interested in continuing eDNA sampling in the area to contribute to and complement NRC’s marine biosecurity programme.

 

Table 1:  Hull Surveillance Programme Results to 08th September 2022

Hull Surveillance Programme Results     

Total this period     

Total     
 YTD     

Pathways Plan Compliance if Moving*

 

      

Number of vessels surveyed this period     

56

86

% Pathways Plan Compliance if Moving (all vessels) *   

67.9

64.3

Vessels found with Marine Pests     

 

    

Sabella spallanzanii (fanworm)    

1

1

Styela clava (clubbed tunicate)    

0

0

Undaria pinnatifida (Japanese kelp)    

0

0

Eudistoma elongatum (Australian droplet tunicate)   

4

4

Pyura doppelgangera (sea squirt)    

0

0

* This is the percentage of vessels surveyed that complied with the acceptable level of ‘light fouling’ as defined in the Marine Pathway Plan. Note: actual compliance is higher given not all these vessels will move from one designated place to another.

 

Ngāti Kuri Partnership

Members of the NRC marine biosecurity staff supported kaiārahi tikanga māori, attended a three-day wānanga hosted by Ngāti Kuri at the taiao unit’s headquarters in Te Paki. This wānanga focussed on the whanaungatanga of NRC and the taiao unit in hope of future collaborations in the marine monitoring space. The taiao unit presented their current work through field trips and storytelling across their rohe with presentations from other attending organisations including Auckland Museum, Department of Conservation, and 4th Generation in the evenings. The wānanga was concluded with a planning and reflection session of what collaboration would look like between Ngāti Kuri and its partners. A reciprocal wānanga hosted by NRC in Whangārei is being planned for late September 2022.

 

Additionally, a representative of the marine biosecurity team was invited to ‘He Wai Ora, He Puna Mātauranga’ – a wānanga organised by Te Ara Whānui Research Centre (part of the Ngāti Kuri Trust Board) and the University of Auckland to discuss and plan short-term and long-term research goals for the moana rohe of Ngāti Kuri. After two days of deep discussions, a draft five-year plan was developed, centred around the unique physical oceanography of the rohe, and will be taken back to the Ngāti Kuri Trust Board. 

Attendees at the Ngāti Kuri Taiao Wānanga held at Te Paki in August.

Members of the Ngāti Kuri Taiao unit, staff from Auckland Museum, DOC and NRC help to identify and count biodiversity in Lake Ngakeketo.

 

eDNA Work and Partnership with NorthTec

NRC’s marine biosecurity team and students from North Tec joined forces with Ngāti Torehina ki Matakā and TriOceans Marine Research and Technology Institute to conduct environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling of Opito Bay, Kerikeri. eDNA as a tool for pest surveillance is a relatively new approach that allows for the detection of genetic material shed by organisms into the environment and is a rapid way to detect if an unwanted organism is present. Stormy conditions on the day couldn't deter the team from collecting the samples and they were processed and labelled for later analysis in the laboratory. This project is in collaboration with Ngāti Torehina ki Matakā who will be conducting regular monitoring of their rohe moana.

 

Wet and windy conditions during eDNA sampling at Opito Bay, Kerikeri.

 

PEST PLANTS

An extended survey beyond known sites was undertaken in Kerikeri this month for the eradication weed called Micky mouse plant Ochna spp.  A substantial number of new sites have been identified indicating the need for additional inspection resource for this area.

 

The southern regime inspections for progressive containment species Mile-a-Minute, Dipogon lignosus, were also completed. In total the proportion of seedling, juvenile and adult regrowth across eight active sites was 5:3:0, indicating good progress is being made toward towards eradication of active sites.  Pultenaea (Pultenaea daphnoides) inspection and control also began this month outside of the Progressive Containment Zone, with further contracts due to take place in the next month during the peak flowering season.

 

Demand for Sustained control rule enforcement continues, particularly for gorse and privet. This work can be time consuming and has to be balanced with the eradication and Progressive Containment Programme workload.

 

Weed Workshops

The annual weed workshops attracted 165 participants this year and were spread over 11 workshops from mid-July until early August. Two of these workshops were put on especially for larger groups of people engaged in the forest or weed space. Te Rarawa in Kaitaia had a team of 13 people engaged in work in the bush from Kauri Ora and the jobs for nature programme. 20 people from City Care, the new contractors for Whangarei District Council, also participated in a separate workshop.

 

 

A group of people in an office

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A group of people in a room

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Participants working on identification

 

National Wilding Conifer Control Programme

A new partnership with Ngāi Takoto is now underway at Kaimaumau. This work seeks to support the existing Job for Nature program, which is targeting a number of weeds species in the Kaimaumau gumland/wetland, including wilding pines. The Regional Council managed work is focusing on removing hazardous burnt, and partly burnt, seed source trees that are beyond the capacity of the Ngāi Takoto jobs for nature crew. This work will complement the other restoration planning and delivery work underway at the site after the major fire that started in December of last year and will help to reduce the reinvasion rate of wilding conifers in this very disturbed landscape.

 

8.2.7   GOVERNANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

 

MĀORI ENGAGEMENT

 

TTMAC Governance Review

During August 2022, a survey was conducted with iwi and hapū members of TTMAC and also distributed throughout their networks to form the basis of a number of recommendations for the incoming council to consider when they establish the wider governance structure of council.  This is separate to the Tiriti Health Check evaluation in which a separate independent report will be provided in conjunction with these recommendations by Whaia Legal and Buddle Findlay to TTMAC (refer to Item 7.8 of the agenda). 

 

The survey questions and findings are collated and attached.  MTAG considered that the survey results complemented the Te Tiriti Health Check draft report, and, at a high level, both support the view that:

·    TTMAC continue as it represents an important relationship with council focused on reflecting and enacting council’s Te Tiriti obligations and commitments

·    Māori councillors are there to represent the region Te Raki and TTMAC provides representation of the multiple layers across council, the voice of iwi and hapū

·    That better recognition is needed for the significant work done by iwi and hapū members to maintain their considerable level of commitment.

 

 

 

Waitai, Waimāori Wānanga

Recently our Kaiārahi Tikanga Māori, supported NRC staff to attend the Ngāti Kuri Waitai, Waimāori wānanga held at the Te Haumihi Headquarters at Te Paki.  Ngāti Kuri invited a number of agencies to share their home fire and to connect with the intention of building enduring relationships.  Those present were NRC, DOC, Habitat, Auckland Museum and Whitebait Connection.

 

As well as being treated to the amazing manaakitanga and hospitality of Ngāti Kuri our staff were able to learn first-hand from Ngāti Kuri about:

 

·    Te Ara Whanui – Ngāti Kuri Flight path and Strategic Plan

·    best practice when working with whanau, hapu and Iwi using the Wai262 Best Practice Guidelines

·    knowledge exchange in practice out in the field

·    opportunities to co create and collaborate together

 

There were monitoring activities throughout the hui and kaitiaki were given the opportunity to learn more about equipment and processes. 

 

At the end of the hui Ngāti Kuri posed the question – how can you support us?  Those who attended (Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao GM Biosecurity, Biosecurity Manager Marine, Biosecurity Specialist Marine, Kaiārahi Tikanga Māori) have undertaken to host a Kaitiaki wānanga here in Whangārei to reciprocate what was generously offered by Ngāti Kuri, to continue to strengthen our relationships and provide the meaningful support. The wānanga will take place from 28-30 September and we look forward reporting back next month.

 

Pictures from Waitai, Waimāori Wānanga

 

 

 

 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Investment and Growth Reserve – Projects Report

Project

Update

Future developments/ reporting

REL

Initial payment under the Deed of Settlement received. 

Quarterly financial statements and resulting repayments to be received beginning for the period ending 30 September. 

Extension 350

Attended evaluation meeting and provided comments on draft final report to consultants.

Final evaluation and project reports to be released and reviewed end of September.

 

Other Work Undertaken

Ÿ Regional Projects Reserve – Prepared a business case for an investment proposal from Marsden Martime Holdings Ltd. 

Ÿ Regional Economic Development Strategy – Attended the Steering Group’s second meeting and organised the second meeting of the local government staff group.

Ÿ Northland Inc – Prepared letter from the Joint Regional Economic Development Committee regarding agreement to the Board approved Statement of Intent 2022-2025.

Ÿ Economic Information – Facilitated training session on the Infometrics platform for the Te Hiku Iwi Development Trust.

Ÿ CLUES scenarios and costings – Presented the scenario costings report to Te Taitokerau Water Advisory Group and provided comments on the additional scenarios report prepared by NIWA.

Ÿ Destination Management Workshop – Participated in workshop organised by Northland Inc. 

 

ONLINE CHANNELS

Most popular content on Facebook:    Facebook post on “Snapped! Feral Deer” (5 August 2022). Reaching 16,884 with engagement 3,181.

 

*Engaged – number of people who ‘reacted’, commented, or shared the post.

Key Performance Indicators

Apl-22

May-22

Jun-22

Jul-22

Aug-22

WEB

 

 

 

 

 

# Visits to the NRC website

37,900

31,600

26,946

50,527

57,337

E-payments made

7

11

14

77

50

# subscription customers (cumulative)

1,368

1,366

1,365

1,364

1,359

SOCIAL MEDIA (cumulative)

 

 

 

 

 

# Twitter followers

1,570

1,580

1,590

1,591

1,593

# NRC Facebook followers

10,600

10,700

10,682

10,817

10,884

# NRC Overall Facebook Reach

62,700

44,000

102,991

117,053

75,741

# NRC Engaged Daily Users

3,838

3,507

5,011

8,692

5,195

# CDEM Facebook fans

26,300

26,300

26,305

26,717

27,049

# CDEM Overall Facebook Reach

111,100

37,000

6,569

203,071

120,694

# CDEM Engaged Daily Users

7,168

1,895

147

25,258

12,890

# Instagram followers

1,526

1,540

1,547

1,557

1,559

 

COMMUNICATIONS AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

 

Media Liaison

The following media releases were created and distributed.

·    Awanui flood scheme proves worth

·    Changes to Freshwater management

·    Pest control programme educates students

·    Marine pest worker off to French Polynesia

·    Courtesy call, warning as spring burning season looms

·    Twenty-four put names forward for regional council

·    Wilding Pines

 

Media monitoring agency Fuseworks recorded 159 items mentioning Northland Regional Council. Top five sources of Northland coverage were:

1.    Northern Advocate (50)

2.    Northland Age (15)

3.    Northern News (10)

4.    Stuff.co.nz (9)

5.    Kaipara Lifestyler (6)

 

Local Elections

The 2022 Local Government elections is a historic occasion for Te Taitokerau. All four councils in the region, including NRC, will be introducing Māori constituencies. Te Taitokerau and Taranaki are the only regions in the entire country to be introducing Māori constituencies throughout all councils in their respective regions.

 

As a part of the elections campaign, all four councils in Te Taitokerau combined forces for a joint campaign focussing on three distinct phases: Enrol, stand, and vote. Over this campaign, a series of regional future councillor information sessions were held throughout the region. These sessions featured panels composed of local government staff, councillors, electoral commission staff, and TTMAC members Mike Kake and Nora Rameka. The purpose of the workshops was to provide information and encouragement to those interested in standing in the elections.

 

Another aspect of the strategy has been a joint social media and advertising campaign which featured a series of short videos produced by a local media agency. Other paid ad spaces are being utilised also, such as bus backs and billboards. The results (as at time of the report) of the campaign and snapshots of the ads are included as an attachment to this report. There has also been media coverage of the elections campaign to date, including print, radio, and television coverage.

 

Finally, NRC has engaged the services of local media personality Luke Bird to further assist with the campaign. As part of his services, Luke has produced a series of audio ads to be played out via radio stations throughout Te Taitokerau. He will also be participating in weekly interviews on all three major iwi radio stations in the region, as well as sharing content via his social media channels.

In total, NRC received 24 nominations for nine seats. One Councillor, Rick Stolwerk, was elected unopposed in the Coastal South General Constituency. There were four nominations received for the two Te Raki Māori Constituency seats.

 

Freshwater Plan Change

The communications element of the Freshwater Plan Change requires significant resourcing and is a key priority for the team. General communications and tangata whenua engagement comms plans have been created and adopted. Work to date includes print advertising in newspapers, flyers and social media content. The focus at this stage is around making people aware that change is coming and that they’ll have the opportunity to have their say.

 

 

 

 

 

ENVIROSCHOOLS / EDUCATION

 

Enviroschools in Taitokerau – 2012 to 2022

During our current CEO’s time with NRC, the Enviroschools Programme in Te Taitokerau has experienced massive growth in the breadth and depth of the sustainability kaupapa across all education sectors.  The number of schools and centres becoming Enviroschools has continued to increase, as has the number of environmental actions per Enviroschool - evidenced as they move through the stages of Bronze, Silver, and Green-Gold.  This growth has been possible due to an associated increase in Enviroschools Facilitators working in Enviroschools communities on a daily basis.


NB:  Not all Enviroschools opt into the Enviroschools stage framework.

 

Then: NRC CEO speaks with ngā tamariki at Oturu School’s Enviroschools Green-Gold celebration, 2013.

Now: NRC CEO with One Tree Point Envirokids at the school’s Enviroschools Bronze celebration, 2022.

 

Project Pest Control – Whangārei and Far North

In August, the wet weather did not deter students or council’s Biosecurity tutors at either the Project Pest Control Whangārei skills course (Kiwi North) or the Far North assessment day (Lonsdale Park).  A total of 100 students from 13 secondary schools were immersed in multiple-animal pest trapping, possum skinning and machine plucking, plus biology and environmental and economic impact knowledge.  The Predator Free Whangārei team made an excellent addition to the skills course by showcasing high-tech pest control tools.

 

Students taking part in Project Pest Control at Lonsdale Park, near Kāeo.

 

Technology and Science fair presentations made

Council’s special category ‘Environmental Excellence Award’ was presented in both Whangārei (Central) and Kerikeri (Far North) Science and Technology Fairs.  The award recognises creative and innovative students whose projects demonstrate a strong scientific approach to solving environmental issues and concerns which will in turn enhance and protect Northland’s environment.

 

The Central winners were Hannah and Harshinni Nayyar from Whangarei Girls’ High School with their project ‘Slurp it!  This ‘wobbly water’ product aims to reduce the impact of single-use plastic bottles in our hapori by creating edible water bottles using food grade chemicals.

 

At the Far North Fair, the award was split amongst four winners from Kerikeri High School.  The projects covered:  pine versus native carbon sequestration, the effectiveness of solar panels and how to optimise their output, vegetable pest control using a noxious weeds spray repellent and the cleanliness of water sources.

 

Enviroschools’ sustainability milestones celebrated

Kaingaroa and Waiotira schools both celebrated becoming Bronze Enviroschools.  These schools have laid the foundations and can show changes in their practices towards becoming a sustainable school community.

 

Kaingaroa School is actively involved in growing its own kai, composting, strengthening relationships with local hapu, generating solar power, and participating in community planting days and the local māra kai.  The school looks forward to providing more habitat for native wildlife, controlling animal pests, and investigating local waterways.

 

Kaingaroa School’s ‘crop swap’ was part of their Enviroschools Bronze celebration

Waiotira School celebrates becoming a Bronze Enviroschool

 

 

Waiotira School enjoys bee keeping, gardening, raising chickens, supporting monarch butterflies, composting, and propagating native plants.  Next steps for the school include creating a pataka kai and nature play areas using learnings from Harko Brown and Te Mara Hupara.

 

 

 

Enviroschools communities facilitated

During August Enviroschools Facilitators held specific interactions with 59 school and early childhood communities.

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL INFORMATION (LGOIMA) REQUESTS

Total LGOIMAs

August 2020 to August 2021

August 2021 to August 2022

23

13

Number of LGOIMAs not responded to within 20 working days

0

 

CUSTOMER SERVICES

Telephone inbound call statistics and enquiries

   

June

July

August

Call volume via Customer Services 

1558 

1959

2073

Average wait time 

9 secs

9.6 secs

10 secs

Calls answered in under 30 seconds 

 

 

2030

Average wait time is up due to staff away.

 

Telephone call volume over the last three years

 

2019-2020 

2020-2021 

2021-2022 

Call volume via Customer Services 

20812 

30566 

23669 

 

Mailroom email processing performance

 

June

July

August

Mail processed

677

741

909

 

Satisfaction monitoring

Feedback cards, compliments, and complaints

Compliments received  

Total

·      City link

·      Zivana and Nyla

1

1

Total compliments recorded

2

 

 

Complaints received  

Total

Ÿ City Link

Ÿ Compliance Monitoring

5

1

Total complaints recorded

6

All complaints have been attended to and are closed. 

No feedback cards were received via mailroom.

 

8.2.8   COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

TRANSPORT

*BusLink figures are reported one month in arrears, due to the required information being unavailable at the time of the agenda deadline

Bus Link stats for July 2022 

(revenue ex GST)   

Actual  

Budget  

Variance  

Year/Date Actual  

Year/Date Budgeted  

Variance  

CityLink Passengers  

 21,282

25,740

-4,458

21,282

25,740

-4,458

CityLink Revenue

$28,599

$33,205

-$4,606

$28,599

$33,205

-$4,606

Mid North Link Passengers  

 

209

 

160

 

49

 

209

 

160

 

49

Mid North Link Revenue  

$841

$709

$131

$841

$709

$131

Hokianga Link Passengers   

53

48

5

53

48

5

Hokianga Link Revenue  

$301

$334

-$33

$301

$334

-$33

Far North Link Passengers   

286

325

-39

286

325

-39

Far North Link Revenue  

$740

$822

-$82

$740

$822

-$82

Bream Bay Link Passengers  

77

24

53

77

24

53

Bream Bay Link Revenue  

$545

$173

$372

$545

$173

$372

Hikurangi Link Passengers  

17

24

-7

17

24

-7

Hikurangi Link Revenue  

$39

$63

-$24

$39

$63

-$24

 

National Bus Driver Shortage

This issue continues to effect services nationwide and, while our services in the Mid and Far North can continue to operate all trips, the Whangārei CityLink have had two days where one trip has been dropped due to illness and driver shortages. Notices continue to be placed on the CityLink website, Facebook and TrackaBus advising the public of these disruptions.

 

Total Mobility (TM)

*Total Mobility Scheme figures are reported one month in arrears, due to the required information being unavailable at the time of the agenda deadline.

 

TM Whangarei

Total Clients

Monthly Actual Expend

Monthly Budgeted Expend

Monthly Variance

Year/Date Actual Expend

Year/Date Budgeted Expend

Annual Variance

July 2022

1277

$28,457

$25,000

$3,457

$28,457

$25,000

$3,457

 

 

TM Far North

Total Clients

Monthly Actual Expend

Monthly Budgeted Expend

Monthly Variance

Year/Date Actual Expend

Year/Date Budgeted Expend

Annual Variance

July 2022

95

$587

$6,250

-$5,863

$587

$6,250

-$5,863

 

Total Mobility figures

The total TM figures including the extra government subsidy is $42,685, we have seen an increase in travel due to the extra central government funding (50% discount on fares) $14,228 is fully claimable.

 

Total Mobility National meetings 

The structure of the national TM meetings is changing, this is coordinated by NTA staff.  There will be 4 meetings a year, two will be operational, dial in optional, no agendas or minutes, discussion on challenges/ issues faced by TM coordinators across the country and scenarios they want to share with the group who are in a similar role. There will also be two formal meetings, updates from Waka Kotahi and MOT.  

 

 

Transport Operators – Wheelchair hoist vehicles

Since COVID-19 transport operators all over NZ are struggling to stay in business, some operators are closing who have fleets of vehicles, including wheelchair capable vehicles, effecting our Total Mobility clients across the country. NTA staff gathered this information from all the regions and presented this to Waka Kotahi - The chart with evidence around taxi operating environment pressures will be provided by MoT directly to Minister Wood.

 

Total Mobility Scheme – Far North

NTA staff met with the Disability Action Group (DAG) in the Far North on 01 August, to update them on the Total Mobility scheme that started in the Kerikeri area on 01 July, there were 45 trips for the month of July, and for the month of August there were 100 trips, the TM scheme continues to grow.

 

ROAD SAFETY UPDATE

Road Trauma Update

Road Fatalities Statistics for the period 1 January 2021 – 6 September 2021

Fatalities Jan – June 2021

Far North

Whangārei

Kaipara

Northland

National

Local roads

3

2

2

7

119

State highways

5

3

7

15

94

TOTAL

8

5

9

22

213

 

 

 

Road Fatalities Statistics for the period 1 January 2022 – 6 September 2022

Fatalities Jan – June 2022

Far North

Whangārei

Kaipara

Northland

National

Local roads

3

6

0

9

134

State highways

10

4

2

16

109

TOTAL

13

10

2

25

243

 

Motorcycle Safety - Ride Forever (R4E) Rider Training Update 2021/2022 Year End (Another Covid affected year)

•     R4E – 2019/2020 – 240 riders completed courses for that financial year.

•     R4E – 2020/2021 – 186 riders completed courses for that financial year.

•     R4E – 2021/2022 – 182 riders have completed courses for this financial year just completed.

•     R4E – 2022/2023 - Financial YTD - 29

 

Bronze Course – 10

Silver Course – 6

Gold Course – 13

 

 

 

ACC Ride Forever (R4E) Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month (MAM)

 

·    1 September: Ministerial Launch at Parliament Grounds

·    Local Media: Road Safety Messages on More FM and the Rock

·    Northland Events include -

·    Saturday 24 September from 10.00am to 2.00pm in store at North Coast Honda, Port Road, Whangarei. A Britton motorcycle will be on display. The Ride Forever trainers will be in store to talk to. An opportunity for a visual check of your motorcycle and go in draw for 1 of 10 checks by mechanic. Free coffee and BBQ. Trade-in your helmet discount. Draw for an Alpinestar Airbag vest.

·    Wednesday 28 September from 5.00pm to 7.30pm at the Old Pak n Save car park, Commerce Street, Kaitaia. Slow speed skills testing – Who is the slowest rider in Te Hiku over 20 metres? Visual checks of motorcycles. Free BBQ, Basic Handling Skills trainer.

Statistics

On average a motorcyclist involved in a serious crash will be off work for 168 days. Total number of days of lost productivity (2019) Motorcycle and Mopeds related claims:

 

·    Whangarei District 46,963 New Zealand 1,744,288. Recent evaluations of ACC data for the Ride Forever Coaching programme participants have shown a decrease in the likelihood of a crash by 27% for those riders who have completed a Ride Forever course. Number of Ride Forever courses delivered in Northland Financial year 2021/22 as at July: 182

 

·    Northland Partners for MAM: Northland Road Safety Trust, Northland Regional Council, Building Safer Communities – Kaitaia, Far North REAP, North Coast Honda, Pro-Rider, Passmasters, AA rider training, Media Works, Northland Transportation Alliance, Waka Kotahi.

 

Waka Kotahi & NZ Police Road Safety Promotion/Media themes

Drugs, Speed, Motorcycling & Safe Vehicles.

 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

New Emergency Management Bill

·    Drafting of the Bill is underway with the intention to introduce it to the House of Representatives after the local government elections.

·    There will be an opportunity to provide feedback via the Select Committee process.

·    Written submissions to the Select Committee are likely to be called for in late November 2022, with hearings in early 2023.

 

National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan and Guide

·    The review of the National Civil Defence and Emergency Management Plan and accompanying Guide is happening alongside the development of the new Emergency Management Bill to ensure alignment.

·    As a result of feedback from stakeholders and the rapidly changing emergency management environment, the intention is that the new Plan is more accessible, user-friendly, and responsive as things change.

·    NEMA is aiming to engage with sector partners on an early draft of the National Plan from October to December 2022.

Response

On 17 and 18 August widespread flooding and damage to roading in the Far North, particularly around Kaitaia, occurred as a result of a northerly weather event.   The Northland CDEM Group coordinated the response and provided regular briefings and updates for partner agencies.

 

As a result of this event, SH1 Mangamuka is closed as assessments are carried out on damage to the road.   Also, part of State Highway 10, Kaeo to Kaitaia, was closed for a period.

 

Although there was widespread flooding there were only a small number of evacuations and requests for welfare assistance near Awanui.  Of note, the Awanui river and the recent flood mitigation works carried out reduced the potential for flooding and damage to the Kaitaia township (see Rivers update).

 

Declarations in the immediate period post Local Government elections

As noted in the NEMA update the following arrangements exist in the event there is a need to declare a local emergency over the period post Local Government elections.   During the period from the official announcement of the election results to the date of the first meeting of the local authority, a state of local emergency will only be able to be declared by the Minister for Emergency Management. 

 

 

 

Marae Preparedness Planning

From recent events over the past year and through our engagement with our Māori communities it has highlighted the need to refresh and update our Marae Preparedness Plan documentation. A word version of a templated plan is currently with a designer being refreshed and a few members of the team have been meeting regularly to workshop the content and to plan for a roll out with Marae who are interested in having their own plans in place. Members of the team plan to consult with some of our iwi partners in October before finalising all the documentation.

 

Multi Agency Coordination Centre

A reviewed concept design has been developed for the Northland Multi Agency Coordination Centre together with updated quantity surveyor estimates.  The updated concept has reduced the overall projected costs, however there is still a gap between what is currently budgeted and the proposed concept design.   

 

   Youth in Emergency Services Program

The Youth in Emergency Services program for the 2022-23 year is planned to be held in the Far North District in May next year. A preliminary meeting has been undertaken to determine the potential location and availability of venues. The tentative location will be in Paihia during the month of May 2023.

 

Welfare Coordination Group (WCG)

The WCG met on 2 September 2022 with presentations on the Tai Tokerau Support Services Directory (Hearts and Minds – Linda Marsh), FENZ Community Readiness and Recovery Team (FENZ – Kim Boyce, Michael Champaloup and Kori Puckey) and the main feature for the meeting: Kaimaumau – A Community of Action (CDEM - Sarah Boniface and FENZ - Wipari Henwood).

 

EMAT Annual Deployment Camp

Over the week 21 – 24 November 2023, Northland will host the Emergency Management Assistance Team (EMAT) Annual Deployment Camp at the Orongo Bay Holiday camp in Russell.  A site visit with NEMA personnel was completed 3-4 August to identify scenario opportunities and look at opportunities for to integrate the home agency into EMAT training.

 

The programme for the week is being developed and will include a one-day desk top exercise, cultural development, and further training on technical and soft skills.  The exercise scenario allows for a multi-agency response with a series of complex and novel problems.

 

The Northland CDEM team will be included in the exercise, providing the opportunity for the team to further develop capability.

 

Tsunami Siren Upgrade

Representatives from HSS Engineering, Denmark recently accompanied CDEM staff in visiting a selection of the proposed new tsunami warning siren sites on their trip to Northland. They also undertook a demonstration of the new tsunami siren. The voice test message and siren warning tone were demonstrated.  A flyer drop was made to neighbours within an approximately 2km sound radius advising of the demonstration as a precaution prior to the demonstration.

 

Representatives from the CEG, CDEM Group and interested Stakeholders attended the demonstration. This was an opportunity to test exactly what the sirens sound like when activated, both voice and siren in the Northland environment and for those attending to engage with HSS engineering representatives.

 

Photos of the demonstration and recordings will be available as part of the engagement campaign.

 

The Northland sirens are three and five tiers and will be mounted on poles 8-10 metres tall, along with the cabinet hardware.

MARITIME

During August a total of 15 maritime incidents were recorded. These incidents were predominantly mooring issues. Relating to either vessels in deteriorating condition on moorings, or incidents where vessels broke away from moorings during weather events and washed ashore. It has been identified that some of these incidents are the result of inexperienced vessel owners mooring their vessels incorrectly. To help address this the Maritime team is working on an education campaign around mooring and anchoring best practices.

 

Summary of costs associated with Abandoned, Derelict, and Unseaworthy Vessels 2021-2022

Derelict vessels and wrecks pose a substantial risk for Northland, both have the potential to be a source of pollution and navigational safety hazards. Removal can be expensive and complex; it is often unpredictable and must be dealt with quickly to minimise negative impacts. Preventative measures are taken by the team through closely monitoring vessels in declining states with the aim to avoid them becoming wrecks. The costs summarised below were incurred through undertaking activities to address derelict vessels and wrecks.

 

2021/22 Budget $56,581

Total costs of NRC staff and NRC vessel hours - $78,703.85
Total external costs - $73,685.00

External costs

·    External waste management contractors are required for transport and disposal of derelict vessels. 

·    In the case of larger derelict or wrecked vessels external contractors with tugs and/ or barges are required.

Recovered costs $4,284.00

·    Wherever possible the Maritime team seek to recover costs through the selling of scrap metal off vessels.

·    When the owner of a vessel can be located an invoice is issued for costs including NRC staff and vessel hours.

This summary accounted for 24 vessels:

·    17 vessels destroyed

·    7 restored to an acceptable seaworthy condition.

 

This is very effective way to reduce costs to the environment and ratepayer. Salvage costs for wrecked vessels are generally very expensive and time consuming.

 

The maintenance of the Aids to Navigation in Whangārei Harbour continued this month and buoys to replace the Kioreroa Reach beacons have been fabricated by the Maritime team and are ready to be deployed by a contractor.

 

The review of the Safety Management System for the Bay of Islands received a good report and was found to be code compliant. 54 Cruise ships are booked to visit the Bay of Islands this season.

 

RIVERS AND NATURAL HAZARDS

AWANUI

Weather Event 18 August 2022

Kaitāia experienced a three-day weather event from 18 to 20 August.  Peak flows between 300 m³/s and 320 m³/s were recorded at the School Cut gauge, which are approximately 25% larger than the next biggest flow ever recorded since the gauge was installed in 1958.  This is approximately 45% bigger than the January 1958 flood which recorded a flow of 220 m³/s, an event which saw floodwaters up to a metre deep inundating Kaitāia township and vast areas of the rural farmland under water for weeks (see below graph).

Image 1 – 1958 flood event along Kaitāia main street (220m3/s = 1m deep along main street)

 

Subsequent analysis from NRC Hydro team and independent consultants are indicating this to be in the neighbourhood of a 1 in 100yr event (in terms of flow).  A comparison of the recent flooding to that of 1958 is given in the table below.

Graph 1 – Flow events recorded at School Cut Gauge between 1958 and 2022

 

No overtopping was recorded through Kaitāia township; however, some overtopping was experienced in the lower Whangatane spillway, and a small number of properties were inundated in this area. Floodwaters had largely dissipated by the 24th of August, including in the lower Whangatane.

The improved scheme performed as designed and successfully mitigated widespread flooding of the Kaitāia township, potential risk to life and property and possibly millions of dollars’ worth of damage.

Image 2 - Awanui River looking SE towards Rongopai Place – Kānoa funded Awanui Scheme Upgrade works

 

The scheme upgrade is designed to increase protection of Kaitāia to 1:100-year flood from 1:30 year flood and the rural area to 1:20 year protection from 1:10 year. 

 

A media release was distributed and multiple messages of positive feedback from the community have been received.

Image 3 - Awanui River at the rear of Bell’s Produce, Kaitāia – Kānoa funded Awanui Scheme Upgrade works

 

Image 4 - Awanui River looking North-East, Matthew’s Park in the foreground – Kānoa funded Awanui Scheme Upgrade works

 

Awanui Scheme Upgrade Progress

The winter period has been busy with design & procurement for the final year of Kānoa funded scheme upgrade works.

 

There is a full programme of works this earthworks season, including benching, stopbanks and floodwalls. There are also improvements programmed to improve flows around several bridges along the scheme. Programming of the proposed works has been updated to focus on the lower reaches of the Whangatane Spillway to help address the overtopping in this area.

 

We are pursuing the purchase of a further 3 properties to enable improved channel alignments, particularly downstream of SH10 bridge, these will be re-sold after flood works are completed. 

 

Two to three tenders are expected to be released to GETs in the coming month, with others following as the designs and property purchases are completed.

 

Positive feedback has been received from Kānoa, particularly regarding the recent flooding event and it is understood the Rivers SIG group plan to make media releases over the coming weeks which highlight the positive effects of the scheme upgrade during the flood event.

 

Otīria/Moerewa

Stage 1 is now 100% complete. The team has awarded the Stage 2 Bridge construction to Ventia Contractors. The budget has increased from $5.1 million to $6.6 million mainly due to inflation and re-design of the bridge from a 42-meter-long bridge to 60-meter-long bridge due to road safety concerns. 

The project will continue while additional funding sources are investigated.

 

There is a cultural induction for Stage 2 with hapu, NRC, Ventia and WSP next Wednesday 14 September.

 

The landowner agreement has been signed and has been submitted to the Māori Land Court and a response is expected before mid-September.

 

Stage 3 tenders were received on the 8 September and will be evaluated next week. 

 

Kerikeri

The job is 90% completed and has been over-wintered. It performed well, despite the wet weather through August.

 

NATURAL HAZARDS   

 Work Streams   

Status   

Comments   

Whangārei (CBD) River Catchment Flood Model  

80% complete

Nothing new to report

Consultant: Ewaters

Website Natural Hazards Portal  

Complete

The Natural Hazards Portal is now complete and live on NRC’s website.

 

https://www.nrc.govt.nz/environment/natural-hazards-portal/

 

Consultants: Morphum

Raupo Drainage Scheme – Coastal Flood Hazard Analysis & Mitigation Options 

95% complete

Nothing new to report

Consultants: Water Technology

Natural Hazards technical and planning support to TAs in Te Taitokerau on District Plans

Ongoing

We have provided support to WDC with their Plan Change and Rules for “Natural Hazards, Hazardous Substances and Esplanade Areas.” Similar support will be provided for KDC and FNDC throughout the year:

·    KDC’s Exposure Draft District Plan change is currently open for consultation https://www.fndc.govt.nz/Whats-new/Have-your-say/Proposed-District-Plan-notification

·    FNDC’s Proposed Plan is currently open for consultation https://www.fndc.govt.nz/Whats-new/Have-your-say/Proposed-District-Plan-notification .

Natural Hazards Work Programme 2022-23

Ongoing

Additions to previously reported tasks are:

·    Scoping out the need for a Regional River Flood Risk Management Strategy following the completion of the new regionwide flood maps and in relation to the above point.

CLIMATE CHANGE RESPONSE

MITIGATION

·    Staff drove a Council EV to Auckland and attended the Smart and Sustainable Building Summit where the CEO of New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga spoke to the urgency with which we must move toward a carbon neutral economy and the role that local government can facilitate this by setting ambitious targets and implementing relevant legislative change.

 

·    Staff visited Whangārei Girls High School science students alongside Whangārei District Council climate staff to deliver a message of hope and opportunity in the fight against the climate crisis and inspire them to be future leaders in this field. The intention is to continue to deliver these messages to our Tai Tokerau rangitahi through periodic engagements and continued collaboration with EnviroSchools.

 

·    Work is coming to completion collating the required information for the carbon inventory audit scheduled with Toitū for October 5. We can expect the verified inventory report to be available for distribution by December 2022. Next steps with this project are to engage additional expertise to develop a Corporate Climate Positive Transition Plan. This Plan will look at the costs and benefits of various scenarios, options for emissions reduction within NRC and identify existing and future potential carbon credits to offset our residual emissions. It is anticipated this Plan will set a clear and urgent goal for the organisation being carbon neutral. Procurement for this work will commence later this year, with the intent of the plan being finalized by mid-2023.

 

·    Staff visited Tahi honey with the Planning and Policy team to look at the native ecosystem restoration work they have undertaken on their land at Pataua North. Meetings with various staff across council have begun to discuss how NRC might be able to contribute to enabling more indigenous carbon sequestration and the associated biodiversity benefits that come with it. Tahi are currently getting their estimates of native forest and wetland sequestration verified – this will provide valuable evidence to assist in influencing Government (MPI) to undertake changes to the ETS settings to enable alternatives to exotic pine plantations to be considered by landowners.  

 

·    Consideration is being given to how the council might play a role in community scale solar generation and have been approached by several solar providers keen to explore potential in Te Taitokerau.

 

NRC CORPORATE EMISSIONS

Below is a snapshot of the organization's greenhouse gas emissions for the April-June quarter of 2022 (Q2).

Fuel use is still the dominant source of emissions, particularly Diesel. Travel increased from 4% in Q1 to 11.2% in Q2.

 

REGIONAL EMISSIONS

·    Statistics NZ has this week released an updated summary of regional emissions around Aotearoa.

·    Staff are in the process of analysing this update, but a snapshot is provided below.

 

·    In Northland there was the drop in industrial emissions (due to the refinery closing) but a rise in household emissions. The large majority of what is called ‘household emissions’ comes from transport

·    Over the same period, Northland’s manufacturing emissions decreased the most of any NZ region due to the closing of the oil refinery at Marsden Point.

 

ADAPTATION

·    Community Adaptation Planning: Kaipara District Council continues to lead the way in developing the region’s first Community Adaptation Plan in the Raupō / Ruawai area. NRC staff are supporting through project management of a new detailed flooding and inundation model of the drainage system and by providing advice into the procurement of new work on facilitation and risk assessment. FNDC and WDC are in the early stages of scoping out their future adaptation work programmes.

 

·    Tom FitzGerald has been appointed to the newly established Climate Change Special Interest Group under the umbrella of Te Uru Kahika.

 

·    The Aotearoa Climate Adaptation Network (ACAN) that was founded and convened by Tom FitzGerald is meeting kanohi-ki-te-kanohi in Wellington 22-23 September. The Network has grown from a small event last year in Lyall Bay, Wellington focused on coastal adaptation to now connecting over 120 local government practitioners across at least 40 councils from all round the motu with a broad remit to look at adaptation more generally.

 

This is one of two staff-led Networks on climate change in the country, the other being led by Tony Moore is focused on mitigation. The huge growth in both of these Networks represents the urgency and desire of local governments to do more to address the climate crisis. Both Networks have arisen in advance of anything from Taituarā or LGNZ and has formed 4-5 years before the Ministry for the Environment anticipated in its National Adaptation Plan. As the group is run on a volunteer basis by a small steering group, work is ongoing to establish a more permanent level of support and discussions are ongoing with LGNZ and MfE in this regard.

 

Below is a snapshot of the intended work programme for this Financial Year from across the four Te Taitokerau Councils. Many of these projects support the implementation of the Te Taitokerau Climate Adaptation Strategy. The recently established Professional Services Panel will likely be called upon to assist in the development and implementation of many of these work streams.

 

 

 

 

Project

Description

NORTHLAND REGIONAL COUNCIL

 

Climate change communications

 

King Tides initiative, climate survey, CoastSnap

 

Review of RMA policies and plans

Review of key NRC external plans and policies such as the Regional Plan and Regional Policy Statement, to ensure alignment with legislative landscape. Also to test alignment with NRC's climate change strategy, find areas for improvement and identify areas of potential inconsistency.

 

Tangata whenua adaptation grant programme development

Scoping and establishment of grant fund to support hapū-led adaptation planning facilitation programme. In coordination with NRC IHEMP programme.

 

Regional flood risk approach

Region-wide flood risk strategy scoping.

 

Corporate climate positive transition plan

Development of corporate climate positive transition plan including an optimised greenhouse gas emissions reduction plan and carbon removal/offset investment plan. Will define organisational GHG emissions reduction and carbon removal targets and set out prioritised actions for council to become net-zero emissions before 2050, with an end goal of reaching climate positive (i.e., net negative emissions). Dependent on carbon footprint work currently underway.

 

Climate governance and reporting review

Climate governance and reporting review. Gap analysis and review of key NRC internal policies to test alignment with various strategies and best practice. Includes review of governance arrangements at joint regional level to ensure best fit for future and ensure delivery.

 

WHANGAREI DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

Alignment of Climate change policies

Review of WDC plans and policies such as the Draft Climate Action Plan, sustainability policy, Te Tai Tokerau Climate adaptation strategy, to ensure alignment across council workstreams and including future proofing for anticipated legislative requirements. Identify areas for improvement and inconsistencies.

 

Climate change education

Design a flexible education resource to disseminate Northland specific climate information across multiple audiences.

 

Community engagement support

Manage engagement process (including Community meetings) ensure accountability to the Terms of Reference, secure the necessary outcomes from community engagement in an efficient, fair, and transparent manner.

 

Vulnerability assessment

Assess coastal and natural hazard impacts on communities. Assess cultural, socio-economic, environmental effects.  Assess risk tolerability against Community Objectives to identify thresholds and explore signals / triggers (STATs) – including cultural indicators.  Option to develop tool / dashboard to support visualisation and communication of impacts.  Will include monitoring and evaluation, reporting.

 

Adaptation technical support

Specific scientific assessments of particular issues e.g., freshwater, groundwater, stormwater, wastewater, land instability, flooding, geomorphological, natural hazard and emergency management etc.  Other relevant science expertise may include geography, ecological, hydrological, climate science, adaptation science, social sciences.

 

Option evaluations and adaptive pathways report

Identify range of adaptation options + pathways, preliminary design advice, costing advice, and impact assessments. Assess adaptation options + pathways against Community Objectives using selected decision analysis/decision framework (including MCDA, RDM, BCA etc.). Produce report detailing process and recommended pathways.

 

Values Survey

Assist in the design/ adaption of community values survey to monitor and respond to changing social structures over time. May include graphic design and web design.

 

 

KAIPARA DISTRICT COUNCIL

 For Raupō/Ruawai

Community Panel Facilitation

 

 

Hazards Risk Assessment

 

 

Vulnerability and Impact Assessment/s:

 

Define vulnerability standards and framework and identify key vulnerabilities based on framework.

 

Assess social, community wellbeing and livelihood impacts.

 

Assess ecological impacts.

 

Identify cascading and/or transitional impacts to wider KDC services.

 

Support KDC staff to scope options to visualise and communicate key impacts across domains.

 

Tangata Whenua impact assessment based in Te Ao Māori

Build from decision making guidance for local government based on Te Ao Māori.

 

Establish a partnership process with Te Uri o Hau kaumatua, haukainga, ahikaroa, and Settlement Trust kaimahi to identify and assess impacts from coastal hazards and river flooding.

 

Engage wider Tangata Whenua in Ruawai area to review impacts.

 

FAR NORTH DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

Adaptation engagement

 

Pick up on initial engagement with community groups in the Bay of Islands.

 

Risk Assessment

 

Looking for help in Asset risk assessment.

 

New Council Workshop

 

Proposal to finalise community adaptation pilot locations.  Will request for Nov/Dec post new council induction.  Will require some consultant help pulling this together.

 

 

Implement Adaptation Pilot project

 

Feb commence pilot project.

 

8.2.9   KAIPARA MOANA REMEDIATION

 

As a Jobs for Nature investment, KMR has a dual focus on growing people into new ‘green economy’ jobs. Since November 2021, KMR developed training courses to upskill 51 local ‘KMR field advisors’, including tangata whenua, to work alongside landowners.  KMR also accredited 19 nurseries and 22 local contractors, and generated more than 60,000 hours of work, bringing tangible benefits to local communities.  While much more is to be done through the KMR Workforce Development programme, progress to date in the programme is encouraging:

 

·    22 Contractors and 19 nurseries have been assessed and accredited since October 2021

·    51 people attended training programmes since November 2021, with 21 currently contracted as KMR Field Advisors and a further 13 likely to be contracted this financial year.

·    Over 61,000 hours of additional activity (~39 FTE) was supported by KMR by 30 June 2022, with a further 34,000+ hours committed for the current financial year (~21 FTE)

·    KMR and MSD have shared the costs of a Kaitiaki Workforce Coordinator based with the Kaipara Uri environmental units, with a similar commitment to other Kaipara Uri as circumstances allow.

 

Importantly, KMR is actively mentoring and supporting the Field Advisors we have trained.  To this end, we are implementing a strategic partnership with NZARM, the NZ Association of Resource Management, to build the capacity of current KMR Field Advisors, including Kaitiaki Advisors, in support of future Freshwater Farm Plans.  Under the partnership, NZARM will access and roll-out third-party-funded support for KMR Field Advisors across the following areas, subject to third-party discussions:

·    Pastoral care support

·    ‘Engaging with landowners’ training

·    ‘Soils 101’ – a very basic overview of soil types/classification relevant to the KMR catchment

·    ‘Wetlands 101’ – a very basic overview of wetlands and wetland identification relevant to the KMR catchment (in partnership with NRC, TBC)

·    ‘Riparian management classification training’ that is relevant specific to the KMR catchment (in partnership with NIWA)

·    Development of formalised teaching documentation / teaching approach for KMR Field Advisors to assist potential future accreditation of a FEP Sediment Module micro-credit

·    Relevant business support – the ABCs of setting up a business

 

As a co-governance programme, KMR takes care to monitor equitable access to our opportunities as one of our informal KPIs.  The attached document sets out how we monitor KMR activity (including training and employment) by iwi/hapū affiliation.  

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 8.3

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Residents' survey results to year end 30 June 2022

From:

Kyla Carlier, Corporate Strategy Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 12 September 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report presents the results of the Northland Regional Council residents’ survey, now a perpetual survey running on council’s website, for the year ending 30 June 2022.

 

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Residents' survey results to year end 30 June 2022’ by Kyla Carlier, Corporate Strategy Manager and dated 27 July 2022, be received.

 

 

Background/Tuhinga

NRC carry out an annual survey of Northland residents to measure things like customer satisfaction, what people know about NRC, what’s important to them, and how well they think we’re responding to those issues. 

 

Historically this data was collected once a year via a third-party research company, however earlier this year council agreed to run the survey differently.

 

The new survey format features a perpetual survey available for residents to complete at any time, and publicised via a QR code on the rates brochures, via social media, and on our website. The advantage of the change is that it allows residents to provide feedback at a time when they feel engaged.  It was acknowledged during development that this could result in a more negative skew, although to date this doesn’t seem to have eventuated, and would also remove the random-selection element of the previous survey.

 

The survey is centred around council’s six community outcomes:

·    Healthy waters for the environment and our people

·    Protected and flourishing native life

·    Resilient, adaptable communities in a changing climate

·    Meaningful partnerships with tangata whenua

·    A strong and sustainable regional economy

·    Safe and effective transport networks connecting our region

 

It asks respondents how important each issue is to them, how well they think council is doing at achieving the outcome, and invites open comments for each outcome. 

 

The survey was initiated in April 2022. Between then and 30 June 2022, 443 survey responses were received.  These responses highlighted that during the period of data collection the three areas that mattered most to respondents (they selected ‘this really matters to me) were:

·    Having healthy waters (67%)

·    Protecting and caring for native life (64%)

·    A prosperous and thriving Northland for current and future generations (61%)

 

This really matters to me

It’s pretty important

It’s important but not top priority

This is not important to me

How important is having healthy waters for you?

67%

24%

9%

0%

How important is it to you that we protect and care for native life?

64%

26%

8%

2%

How important is a prosperous and thriving Northland for current and future generations?

61%

32%

5%

2%

How important do you think community resilience and climate change is?

45%

36%

12%

7%

How important is it for you to have safe, effective and low emission transport options connecting our communities?

33%

35%

19%

13%

How important do you consider partnerships between council and tangata whenua to be?

27%

26%

20%

27%

 

 

Of the areas identified by respondents where council is ‘not doing a good job’, the top three were:

·    Safe, effective and low emission transport options connecting our communities (39%)

·    A prosperous and thriving Northland for current and future generations (30.5%)

·    Community resilience and climate change (27%)

 

How well do you think we’re doing at achieving this?

You’re doing great

You could do better

Not doing a good job

I don’t know

Protect and care for native life

17%

57%

18%

8%

Partnerships between council and tangata whenua

16%

28%

12%

44%

Having healthy waters

13%

49%

27%

11%

Community resilience and climate change

9%

45%

27%

19%

A prosperous and thriving Northland for current and future generations

8%

46%

30%

16%

Safe, effective and low emission transport options connecting our communities

4%

33%

39%

24%

 

 

 

 

The survey identified an overall ‘satisfaction’ rating of 2.79 out of 5, based on the question “thinking about Northland Regional Council overall, how do you feel about us?”, as outlined in the graph below:

 

 

While this question is different from those asked in previous surveys, it can be compared with the ‘overall reputation’ ratings from the 2021 resident survey:

 

 

The survey also measured awareness of the community about the type of activities NRC is responsible for, which highlighted a lack of knowledge about provision of the bus service and operation of water supply in particular.  This is outlined in the graph below, which shows the number of participants that selected each activity as something they thought NRC looks after.   This data will be useful to monitor knowledge and awareness over time.

 

 

In addition to the six community outcome areas, overall satisfaction and demographic questions, the survey is also used to measure a key performance indicator (KPI) included in the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021-2031, ‘Percentage of residents surveyed who are satisfied with overall communication, community involvement and engagement’.  This KPI has a target to maintain or increase the percentage of residents who are satisfied, once a baseline is established. A baseline of 33% was established with the data ending 30 June 2022, with this result informing council’s Annual Report 2022 which is reported to council separately.

 

The responses provide information to council and staff about the priorities of the community, can highlight any areas of concern, and can be relied upon by council if they are seeking information about a specific area of council work, in order to make a decision.  The open comments that are provided for each area, after being censored, are provided to the relevant teams for their assessment.

 

The results, exclusive of the free-text comments, are set out in the attached report. 

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Residents' survey ending June 2022 Report to Council  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 8.3

27 September 2022Attachment 1






















Council Meeting                                                                                                                                  item: 8.4

27 September 2022

 

TITLE:

Chief Executive Officer's Key Performance Indicators - final report

From:

Kyla Carlier, Corporate Strategy Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 21 September 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report presents a brief summary of the tenure of the Chief Executive Officer, Malcolm Nicolson, including the report of Chief Executive Key Performance Indicators for the year ending 30 June 2022.

 

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Chief Executive Officer's Key Performance Indicators - final report’ by Kyla Carlier, Corporate Strategy Manager and dated 19 September 2022, be received.

 

 

Background/Tuhinga

The tenure of Malcolm Nicolson, Chief Executive of the Northland Regional Council, comes to a close this month with his retirement.  This is the last meeting of council where Malcolm will be Chief Executive Officer.

Malcolm’s 11 years with council, beginning in January 2012, have spanned three general elections, three local body elections and two by-elections, and four different councils.  The number of elected members on council has changed, constituency boundaries have moved, and demographics have shifted from the 100% male council elected in 2012 to a council with improved demographic and gender balance.

Early on in his role as CEO, Malcolm traversed the implementation of the 2012 Local Government Amendment Act which saw the purpose statement of local government change to focus on infrastructure, service delivery and cost-effectiveness, and saw this through to the 2019 amendment bill that changed focus again to community well-beings. 

The first purpose of local government remained throughout these changes to be to “enable democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of, communities”;  Malcolm’s consistent leadership as CEO over these years saw this purpose continuously brought to the forefront of the minds of those serving on council, as he advocated for increasing levels of participatory democracy and, worked with elected members and staff to negotiate the community’s increasing involvement and expectations.

The organisation itself has also changed a lot in that time to keep pace, with annual operating revenue increasing from $30M in 2012 to $73M, and staff numbers increasing from 142 to 296 today, with diversity, equity and inclusion now much more central to growth.

Malcolm’s tenure has seen the development of multi-million dollar flood schemes and the Hopua te Nihotetea Detention Dam in Whangārei, the launching of the Kaipara Moana remediation programme, and the launch of the successful predator free project at Whangārei Heads.  He was instrumental in the establishment of council’s economic development agency Northland Inc, and in collaborations such as the civil defence emergency management group, Northland | Forward Together, the climate change working party and the Northland Transportation Alliance. 

In recognition of council’s responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, partnerships between māori and council were strengthened under Malcolm’s guidance with the establishment of Te Taitokerau Māori advisory committee, an MoU with Te Uri O Hau, the signing of Whanaunga ki Taurangi by Iwi Chairs and Mayors, and the signing of a mana whakahono-ā-rohe agreement with two hapū.  The two new dedicated māori seats on council are the most recent achievement in this partnership work.

In addition, Malcolm has led the organisation through an ever-increasing BAU workload, the expansion of council’s network of service-centres, and other projects such as the granting of a loan to the Northland Emergency Services Trust to enable procurement of two rescue helicopters for the region.

Malcolm’s astute financial mind has provided oversight of council’s multi-million dollar investment portfolio, and developments such as the Kensington Crossing mixed-use development.

Each year Malcom has worked with his Executive Leadership Team and council (or a sub-committee) to establish a set of measures of his performance as Chief Executive Officer.  These key performance indicators are closely tied to delivery of council’s long term plan goals, and are reported on at the end of each year.  This year they are aligned with council’s six groups of activities.

Malcolm’s final set of indicators, for the financial year ending 30 June 2022, are presented below. Where targets are not achieved an explanation is provided, including where these have been affected by the ongoing impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

 
 
Environmental Services
Achieved:	8
Not achieved:	4
Not applicable:	1
, 
 
Biosecurity
Achieved:	1
Not achieved:	0
Not applicable:	0
 
 
Regulatory Services
Achieved:	2
Not achieved:	1
Not applicable:	0
, 
 
Governance 
and engagement
Achieved:	4
Not achieved:	1
Not applicable:	1
 
 
Community Resilience
Achieved:	7
Not achieved:	1
Not applicable:	0
, 
 
Corporate services
Achieved:	5
Not achieved:	0
Not applicable:	0

 


 Environmental Services

 

 

 

 

 

 


Biodiversity  - Maintain and enhance indigenous biodiversity and eco-systems 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Number of plants provided through CoastCare programme 

2021/22: 14,000 
2022/23: 15,000 
2023/24: 16,000 
2030/31: 20,000 

12,290 plants

Not achieved 

COVID-19 restrictions in July and August 2021 meant several planting events couldn't go ahead. Planting was also lower than normal in May/June 2022 due to availability of contractors required to undertake animal and plant pest control prior to planting; weather restricting both pest control work and planting; and the ability of schools to attend planting days with staff sickness.

Number of top-ranked lakes identified in the Northland Lakes Strategy that are under active management1 with stock excluded 

20 Lakes  

19 Lakes 

Not achieved 

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, one of 20 lakes listed in the Northland Lakes Strategy did not have its LakeSPI monitoring carried out in the time period, and therefore did not meet the criteria of active management. 

 

Land and water - Improved water quality, sustainable land management and soil conservation

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Number of subsidised poplar poles provided for erosion-prone land by the council-owned nursery 

2021/22; 5,000 
2022/23: 7,000 
2023/24: 9,000 
By 2031/31: 25,000

 

Achieved 

8,030 poles.

The percentage of Environment Fund allocation (in dollar value) that proceeds to completion of successful projects that meet council objectives 

95% or more 

83%

Not achieved 

83% 

There were several issues farmers faced this year – COVID-19, price rises, and supply chain hold-ups – all of which all impacted the number of projects completed.

This result is calculated on general environment fund allocation and does not include contributions towards central government funded projects. 

Percentage of routinely monitored river sites with a Water Quality Index (WQI) score of ‘Excellent’ or ‘Good’ 

Maintain or increase (baseline not yet established) 

 37%

Baseline established 

As this is a new measure, the data collected from this period establishes the baseline. Data collected from 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2020 shows a result of 38%, so there is a slight downward trend when compared to this.

Percentage of NRC freshwater activities implemented in accordance with the NRC Freshwater Improvement Framework. 

100% 

 NA 

Too early to report on this. 

The framework outlines key activities NRC will undertake to improve freshwater management across a 3- and 10-year time period. 

It was adopted by council in July.

The process was put on hold when the government released the essential freshwater package, and reporting on completed activities is not yet available.

 

Kaipara Moana Remediation Project  - The Kaipara Remediation Project is continuing to work successfully.  With a high performing business unit within the NRC team  

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Achievement of three key indicators of the project and business unit:  
- Council’s obligations under the programme’s Deed of Funding 
- Implementation of KMR Joint Committee decisions in a timely and effective manner. 
- Operation of the Kaipara Maurikura operational vehicle 

33.3% - 100% of obligations are met 
33.3% - Zero issues raised by the committee on programme operations 
33.3% - Operation of the Kaipara Maurikura is consistent with the principles set out in the KMR MOU. 

Achieved 

NRC has met all obligations under the Deed of Funding, with the most recent audit identifying no areas of concern. 

 

All KMR Joint Committee decisions have been recorded and actioned in a timely way, in line with expectations.  Previous outstanding decisions have been recorded, actioned and reported back to the Joint Committee. 

 

Regular feedback from the Chair and Deputy Chair indicates that the Kaipara Maurikura is operating in a manner consistent with the MOU. 

Successful delivery of Kaipara Moana Remediation Project workplan milestones through the contribution of financial, governance, staff and technical support  

100% of milestones (as set out in the project workplan) 

Achieved 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planning - Developing and maintain regional planning documents and strategies

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Percentage of environmental planning legislative requirements achieved each 
year 

100% of requirements met 

 Achieved 

The Freshwater Plan Change is publicly notified by Sept. 2023. 

100% 

 Not achieved 

The aim is now to notify in April 2024.  The change in timeframe has been discussed and endorsed by council.  The statutory requirement is notify the plan change by the end of 2024 – so council is still well within that timeframe.  TTMAC have endorsed the approach for involving tangata whenua in the plan change development process, of particular note is the establishment of the Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group and appointment of three TTMAC members to work with councillors in the council workshops for the development of the draft plan change.  

 

 

 

Monitoring  - Gathering and analysis of robust environmental data for the response, resolution and sustainability of a healthy environment in Northland with a climate change context. 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Percentage of NRC environmental networks monitored for water quality and quantity, and ecology, with results made available to the community 

100% 

 Achieved 

 

Percentage of time that continuous monitoring of air sheds is achieved, with any exceedances of National Environmental Standards reported and made available to the community 

100% 

Achieved 

 

Percentage of data from routinely monitored sites that meets quality standards and is made available to the community within 12 months of collection 

90% or more 

95.9%

Achieved 

 

Regulatory Services

   

 

 

 


Consenting  - Providing efficient and effective processing and administering of all regulatory instruments.

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Percentage of  applications that are processed within the 
statutory timeframes 

100% 

Not achieved

99.92%

 

One out of 1,201 consents was not processed within the statutory timeframes due to an administration error that has now been rectified.

Percentage of consents that are monitored as per the council's consent monitoring programme

90% 

  Achieved 

95% 

Percentage of environmental incidents reported to the Environmental Hotline 
resolved within 30 working days 

80% resolved within 30 working days 

  Achieved 

80% 




 

 

Community resilience

 

 


 

Natural Hazard Management  - Effective responses to Identified natural hazards 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Percentage of engaged communities subject to significant hazards that are supported to develop community response plans to guide their responses 

100% 

 Achieved 

 

Water Resilience Fund has been granted towards activities and projects that support improving water resilience infrastructure for vulnerable communities. 

100% of the $500,000 Water Resilience Fund has been granted, and there is a grant plan for the following 2 financial years. 

 Achieved 

Two community water resilience infrastructure projects have been funded in the year 2021-2022.

Te Kotahitanga e Mahi Kaha Trust ($172K) and Whaingaroa Whaihanga Te Rūnanga o Whaingaroa, Tūtū Te Wai ($376K), have received funding.

  

Remaining funds have been used to pay the contractor leading this project. 

 

Number of flood events occurring as a result of failures of flood protection systems below specified design levels, for the Awanui, Whangārei, Kaeo, Panguru and Otiria/Morewa schemes  

Zero 

 Achieved 

 

 

Navigational management - Ensuring the region's navigable waters are safe for people to use in an environmentally sustainable manner. 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Maintain a regional oil spill response plan, including a minimum of 30 up-to-date trained responders 

Maintain a minimum of 30 responders at all times 

 Achieved 

 

 

Marine activities are safely managed, with nationally compliant Harbour Safety Management Systems that comply with the Port and Harbour Marine Safety Code Operational safety management system2 

100% compliance  

 Achieved 

 

Survey at least 2000 vessel hulls for marine pests each year as part of marine biosecurity surveillance programme 

2,000 hulls annually 

 Achieved 

 

 

Transportation - Providing an efficient and effective public bus service 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Percentage of passengers surveyed on the Whangarei, Kaitāia and Mid-North bus services that are satisfied with the overall service provided  

90% or more compliance from 3/3 measures  

Not achieved 

Whangārei CityLink - 93% compliance.

Far North Link and Mid North Link – survey not carried out as both services were being retendered in 2021/2022.

 

Climate Change Adaptation  - Developing a regional climate change adaptation strategy that guides communities to identify and manage risk. 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Development, delivery and implementation of key regional climate change plans and documents 

Project goals as per methodology 
 

 Achieved 

 

 


 

 

  Biosecurity

 

 

 


Biosecurity - Measures to slow the introduction and spread of new and established pests 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Increase in hectares of land under Community Pest Control Area Plans (CPCAs) per annum 

 

5,000ha annually  

 

 

 

 Achieved 

7,345 ha 

 

 

 

  Governance and engagement

 

 

 


Governance  – Maintaining an effective relationship between Governance and Management

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Average effectiveness score achieved by an annual Survey of ELT (50% weighting) and Councillors (50% weighting), rating effectiveness of their relationship from 0 (poor) to  5 (excellent). 

Survey result of 4 or higher. 

Achieved 

Average rating 4.2 

 

Survey completed by all ELT members (one acting) and 6 of 9 councillors. 

 

Māori relationships  - Integration of Māori in council decision making.   

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Achievement of two key indicators: 

· Average TTMAC satisfaction score achieved by an annual survey rating satisfaction from 0 (not satisfied) to 5 (very satisfied) (50% of weighting);

· Implementation of recommendations resulting from the Te Tiriti/Treaty Health Check (50% of weighting)   

·  Survey result of 4 or higher 

·  100% of recommendations implemented in accordance with approved implementation plan.

50% - Not achieved

 

50% - Not applicable

The TTMAC survey referenced a 1-10 scale; the target score for this KPI of 4, when converted, is a target score of 7-8. The average score for the survey was 5.6.

It is of note that overall 78% of participants in the survey were satisfied in terms of meaningful outcomes that were achieved for iwi and hapu.

 

Te Tiriti Health Check is at the  recommendation stage, not at implementation stage yet. The Tāiki e (NRC Te Tiriti Strategy and Implementation Plan) document has been formally adopted.

 

 

Community engagement - Promoting transparency and honesty in all community engagement. 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Percentage of time that information is made available to the community in a timely, accurate and accessible manner. 
 

33.3% - Agendas and minutes made available on our website, within reasonable timeframes, 100% of the time. 
33.3% - Unqualified summary document audit report on AR summary doc achieved annually. 
33.3% - Website meets best practice 100% of the time. 

Achieved 

Part one: Conditionally achieved[10]

Part two: Achieved  - 2021 Annual Report Unqualified audit opinion achieved  

Part three: Achieved – ALGIM rating of “good rated website experience provided” 

 

 

 

Economic development  - Facilitating economic development through a collaborate vehicle to improve Northland's economic sustainability and social equity. 

How we'll measure performance 

2021/22 - Target 

Results 

Commentary 

Percentage of key performance indicators set out in Northland Inc's draft annual report that are achieved by 30 June each year 

100% 

 Not achieved 

88%