Council

Tuesday 22 November 2022 at 10.30am

 

 

AGENDA

 


Council Meeting

22 November 2022

Northland Regional Council Agenda

 

Meeting to be held in the Council Chamber

36 Water Street, Whangārei

on Tuesday 22 November 2022, commencing at 10.30am

 

Recommendations contained in the council agenda are NOT council decisions. Please refer to council minutes for resolutions.

 

RĪMITI (Item)                                                                                                                                                                 Page

1.0       Ngā Mahi Whakapai / Housekeeping

Key Health and Safety points to note:

·         If the fire alarm goes off – exit down the stairwell to the assembly point which is the visitor carpark.

·         Earthquakes – drop, cover and hold

·         Visitors please make sure you have signed in at reception, and that you sign out when you leave. Please wear your name sticker.

·         The toilets are on the opposite side of the stairwell.

·         Please adhere to the recommended Covid alert guidance that applies.

2.0       Karakia Timatanga – Tauāki ā roto / Opening karakia

3.0       Ngā Whakapahā / apologies

4.0       Ngā Whakapuakanga / DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

5.0       Ngā Whakaae Miniti me te Mahere Mahi / Council Minutes and Action Sheet

5.1       Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022                                                                                     6

6.0       Ngā Ripoata Putea / Financial Reports

6.1       Financial Report to 31 October 2022                                                                                                 11

6.2       Update to Financial Delegations - November 2022                                                                      15

7.0       Ngā Take / Decision Making Matters

7.1       Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios                 21

7.2       Annual Report on the Biosecurity Operational Plan                                                                     61

7.3       Regional Rates Collection - update to 30 September 2022                                                     147

7.4       Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation 151

7.5       Council submissions - Draft Kaipara District Plan and Far North District Plan                  162

8.0       Ngā Ripoata Mahi / Operational Reports

8.1       Health and safety report                                                                                                                      181

8.2       Chief Executive’s Report to Council                                                                                                 191

8.3       Reporting on Long Term Plan 2021-2031 Performance Measures for Quarter One of the 2022/23 Year                                                                                                                                                              240

9.0       Kaupapa ā Roto / Business with the Public Excluded                                                           246

9.1       Human Resources Report - September and October 2022

9.2       Purchase of Properties for Awanui Flood Scheme Upgrade   


 

ACC - Accident Compensation Corporation

ALGIM - Association of Local Government Information Management

AMA - Aquaculture Management Area

AMP - Asset Management Plan/Activity Management Plan

AP - Annual Plan

BOI - Bay of Islands

BOPRC - Bay of Plenty Regional Council

CAPEX - Capital Expenditure (budget to purchase assets)

CBEC - Community, Business and Environment Centre

CCO – Council Controlled Organisation

CCTO – Council Controlled Trading Organisation

CDEM - Civil Defence Emergency Management

CEEF – Chief Executives Environment Forum

CEG - Co-ordinating Executive Group

CEO - Chief Executive Officer

CIMS - Co-ordinated Incident Management System (emergency management structure)

CMA - Coastal Marine Area

CPCA - Community Pest Control Areas

CRI - Crown Research Institute

DHB - District Health Board 

DOC - Department of Conservation

DP – District Plan

E350 – Extension 350 programme

ECA - Environmental Curriculum Award

ECAN - Environment Canterbury

EECA - Energy Efficiency Conservation Authority

EF - Environment Fund

EMA - Employers and Manufacturers Association

EOC - Emergency Operations Centre

EPA - Environmental Protection Authority

ETS - Emissions Trading Scheme

FDE - Farm Dairy Effluent

FNDC - Far North District Council

FNHL - Far North Holdings Limited

FPP - First Past the Post

GE - Genetic Engineering

GIS - Geographic Information System

GMO - Genetically Modified Organism

HBRC - Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Horizons - Brand name of Manawatu-Wanganui Regional Council

HR - Human Resources

HSNO - Hazardous Substances & New Organisms Act 

HSWA - Health and Safety at Work Act 2015

IHEMP – Iwi/Hapū Environmental Management Plan

ILGACE - Iwi and Local Government Chief Executives Forum

IPPC - Invited Private Plan Change

IRIS - Integrated Regional Information System

KDC - Kaipara District Council 

KPI - Key Performance Indicator

LAWA – Land, Air, Water Aotearoa

LEA - Local Electoral Act 2001

LGA - Local Government Act 2002

LGNZ - Local Government New Zealand

LGOIMA - Local Government Official Information & Meetings Act 1987

LIDAR – Light detection and ranging

LTI – Long time injury

LTP - Long Term Plan

MBIE – Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment

MFE - Ministry for the Environment

MFL – Māori Freehold Land 

MHWS - Mean High Water Springs

MMH - Marsden Maritime Holdings Limited

MNZ - Maritime New Zealand

MOH - Ministry of Health

MOT - Ministry of Transport

MPI - Ministry for Primary Industries

MSD - Ministry of Social Development

MTAG – Māori Technical Advisory Group (a subgroup of TTMAC)

NCMC - National Crisis Management Centre

NDHB - Northland District Health Board

NEMA – National Emergency Management Agency

NES - National Environmental Standards

NFT – Northland | Forward Together

NGO - Non-Governmental Organisation

NIF - Northland Intersectoral Forum

NINC - Northland Inc. Limited

NIWA - National Institute of Water and Atmosphere

NORTEG - Northland Technical Advisory Group

NPS - National Policy Statement

NPS-FM - National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

NZCPS - New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement

NZTA – Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency

NZTE - New Zealand Trade and Enterprise

NZWWA - New Zealand Water and Wastes Association

OFI - Opportunity for Improvement

OPEX – Operating Expenditures

OSH - Occupational Safety & Health

OTS – Office of Treaty Settlements

PCBU - Person Conducting Business or Undertaking

PGF – Provincial Growth Fund

PPE - Personal Protective Equipment

RAP - Response Action Plan

RBI - Regional Broadband Initiative

RFI - Request for Information

RFP - Request for Proposal

RLTP - Regional Land Transport Plan

RMA - Resource Management Act 1991

RMG - Resource Managers Group (Regional Councils)

RMZ - Riparian Management Zone

ROI - Return on Investment

RP – Regional Plan

RPMP - Regional Pest Management Plan

RPMS - Regional Pest Management Strategy

RPS - Regional Policy Statement

RPTP – Regional Public Transport Plan

RRSAP – Regional Road Safety Action Plan

RSG – Regional Sector Group

RSHL - Regional Software Holdings Ltd

RTC - Regional Transport Committee

RTO - Regional Tourism Organisation

SIG – Special Interest Group

SIPO - Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives

SITREP - Situation Report

SOE - State of Environment (or) State Owned Enterprise

SOI – Statement of Intent

STV - Single Transferable Vote

TAG - Technical Advisory Group

TKoT  - Te Kahu o Taonui

Tier 1 - Site level plan or response for an oil spill

Tier 2 - Regional level plan or response to an oil spill

Tier 3 - National level plan or response to an oil spill

TLA - Territorial Local Authority – City & District Councils

TON – Top of the North (regions)

TTMAC – Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party

TTNEAP – Tai Tokerau Northland Economic Action Plan

TMP - Treasury Management Plan

TOR - Terms of Reference

TPK - Te Puni Kōkiri (Ministry of Māori Development)

TWWAG – Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group

UNISA - Upper North Island Strategic Alliance

WDC - Whangarei District Council

WRC - Waikato Regional Council

WSMP - Workplace Safety Management Practices

 

 



Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 5.1

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022

From:

Meloney Tupou, Maori Governance and Engagement Support Admin

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement, on 15 November 2022

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the minutes of the council meeting held on 25 October 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 5.1

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

This page is a placeholder for a single page of a PDF attachment. It will be replaced by the actual PDF page when the PDF version of this document is generated.

 

Report: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022 and 27 September 2022

Attachment: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022

Page: 1


 

 

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Report: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022 and 27 September 2022

Attachment: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022

Page: 2


 

 

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Report: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022 and 27 September 2022

Attachment: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022

Page: 3


 

 

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Report: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022 and 27 September 2022

Attachment: Confirmation of Minutes - 25 October 2022

Page: 4


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 6.1

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Financial Report to 31 October 2022

From:

Taka Skipwith, Financial Accountant

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 15 November 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report is to inform council of the year to date (YTD) financial result to October 2022. Council has achieved a YTD surplus after transfers to and from reserves of $3.4M (September YTD $3.3M) which is $552K (September $662K YTD) favourable to budget.

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Financial Report to 31 October 2022’ by Taka Skipwith, Financial Accountant and dated 10 November 2022, be received

 

Background/Tuhinga

  

 

 

Managed Funds

 

No managed fund gains or losses have been accrued for the month of October, due to the Eriksens Global report not yet available.  An update on fund performance for October will be included in the November financial report.  The gains/losses reported here are for September YTD against October YTD budgets.

 

 

Revenue                                                       

Year to date revenue is $26.7M, which is $49K or 0.02% below budget.  

  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Expenditure

Year to date expenditure is $21.0M, which is $263K or 1.2% below budget. 

 

 

 


 


 

Salary Variances

Across council there is a $652K net favourable salaries variance predominantly due to the time to complete recruitment of vacant positions and new positions identified in the LTP (Long Term Plan).

 

Transfers to reserves

For the year to date there has been a net transfer to reserves of $2.2M (September YTD $1.6M) compared to a budgeted net transfer to reserves of $2.5M (September YTD $1.M).  The variance of $337K is predominantly due to

 

·    $364K lower than budgeted transfers to externally managed fund reserves, due to lower than budgeted gains on short term and long-term funds to September YTD.

 

Capital Expenditure

Capital expenditure amounts to $1.9M and is $1.6M less than the corresponding budget at this stage of the year predominantly due to:

·    Delays in the Awanui flood protection works programme ($780K behind budget) because of contractors being denied access to site and unfavourable weather conditions.

 

·    Delays in the Otiria-Moerewa flood mitigation spillway ($719K behind budget) because of longer than anticipated negotiations with landowners in order to secure the land for the Pokapu bridge.

Both of these projects are targeted rate funded and are expected to be completed by December 2023 in-line with the extension granted by MBIE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Nil

 


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 6.2

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Update to Financial Delegations - November 2022

From:

Anan Thiru, Accounting Assistant - Treasury and Projects and Simon Crabb, Finance Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 04 November 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

This report seeks approval to ratify 2 council officers as new authorised bank signatories, and update the financial delegations prescribed in council’s Delegations Manual.

The proposed updates are:

·    ratify Taka Skipwith (Financial Accountant) as a bank signatory as she has replaced Vincent McColl

·    ratify Ruben Wylie (GM – Environmental Services) as a bank signatory as he has replaced Jonathan Gibbard

·    update the named CEO incumbent to Jonathan Gibbard as he has replaced Malcolm Nicolson

·    remove the Acting Management Accountant role from the Delegations manual as this role no longer exists

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Update to Financial Delegations - November 2022’ by Anan Thiru, Accounting Assistant - Treasury and Projects and Simon Crabb, Finance Manager and dated 4 November 2022, be received.

2.         That Ruben Wylie is ratified as an authorised signatory of council’s bank accounts

3.         That Taka Skipwith is ratified as an authorised signatory of council’s bank accounts

4.         That council’s Delegation Manual is updated to reflect Attachment 1 pertaining to item 6.2 of the 22 November 2022 council agenda.

 

OptionsNo.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Approve updates to the financial delegations as recommended and presented in Attachment 1

Accurate and up to date documentation will enable the correct users to be setup and operate the councils banking facilities.

None

2

Do not approve the updates to the financial delegations as recommended and presented in Attachment 1

None

Reduced users with banking access will hinder the processing of payments and increase the risk of late payments in times of staff absences.

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1.

Considerations

1.    Significance and engagement

Section 76AA of the LGA directs that council must adopt a policy setting out how significance will be determined, and the level of engagement that will be triggered.  This policy assists council in determining how to achieve compliance with the LGA requirements in relation to decisions.

This decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s Significance and Engagement Policy because it is part of council’s day to day activities.  Council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

2.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

The activities detailed in this report are in accordance with the council's Treasury Management Policy which was adopted in compliance with the decision-making requirements of sections 76–82 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Further considerations

Being a purely administrative matter Environmental Impact, Community Views, Māori Impact Statement, Financial Implications, and Implementation Issues are not applicable.

 

Background/Tuhinga

Council’s delegation manual records delegations given to council officers in relation to administrative and financial matters, and in relation to statutory duties, responsibilities, and powers.

Updates to the financial delegations within the Delegations manual are proposed in response to council appointing a new Chief Executive Officer, a new GM of Environmental Services and a new Financial Accountant, and the role of Acting Management Accountant ceasing to exist.

An excerpt from the Delegation’s manual, is provided in Attachment 1 highlighting, in yellow, the changes proposed in this agenda item.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Proposed Update to the Councils Financial Delegations  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 6.2

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

This page is a placeholder for a single page of a PDF attachment. It will be replaced by the actual PDF page when the PDF version of this document is generated.

 

Report: Update to Financial Delegations - November 2022

Attachment: Proposed Update to the Councils Financial Delegations

Page: 1


 

 

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Report: Update to Financial Delegations - November 2022

Attachment: Proposed Update to the Councils Financial Delegations

Page: 2


 

 

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Report: Update to Financial Delegations - November 2022

Attachment: Proposed Update to the Councils Financial Delegations

Page: 3


 

 

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Report: Update to Financial Delegations - November 2022

Attachment: Proposed Update to the Councils Financial Delegations

Page: 4


Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.1

22 November 2022

i

 

TITLE:

Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

From:

Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist and Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Jonathan Gibbard, Tāhūhū Rangapū  - Chief Executive Officer and Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement, on 17 November 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

This report presents the proposed governance structure for the 2022-2025 Triennium for council’s formal consideration.

It concludes with the recommendations that the council approves the proposed governance structure and membership, including the delegations and terms of reference where relevant.  Recommendations are also made for appointments to River Liaison Groups and councillor portfolios.

 

Recommendations

1.         That the report ‘Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios’ by Chris Taylor, Governance Specialist and Auriole Ruka, Pou Manawhakahaere - GM Governance and Engagement and dated 4 November 2022, be received.

2.         That Northland Regional Council establishes the following committees, subcommittees and working parties and approves the Terms of Reference for each (as detailed in Appendix One):

a.    Regional Land Transport Committee[1]

b.    Investment and Property Subcommittee

c.     Audit and Risk Subcommittee

d.    Natural Resources Working Party

e.    Biosecurity and Biodiversity Working Party

f.     WDC/NRC Whangārei Public Transport Working Party

 

3.         That the Northland Regional Council reaffirms the continuation of the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party (TTMAC) - that was deemed by the previous council not to be discharged on the coming into office of the council elected at the October 2022 triennial elections - and its Terms of Reference (as detailed in Appendix Seven).[2]

4.         That the Terms of Reference for joint committees and the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council Working Party be reviewed by the respective joint committees and TTMAC at their first meeting.  Any amendments agreed upon are to be brought back to respective councils for ratification.

5.         That the council approves the membership of the subcommittees, joint committees and working parties, including the appointment of the Chairperson as ex-officio to all subcommittees and working parties, as set out in the body of this report and attachments.

6.         That the Chairperson of each committee, subcommittee and working party report verbally to council monthly on their activities at the ordinary council meeting.

7.         That the council appoints councillors to the following River Working Groups in the following roles:

Memberships / Delegation

Councillor

Kāeo-Whangaroa River Working Group

Cr M Robinson as Chair (Alternate Cr J Carr)

Kaihū River Working Group

Cr J Blackwell as Chair

Kerikeri River Working Group

Cr J Carr as Chair (Alternate Cr M Robinson)

Ruakākā River Working Group

Cr R Stolwerk as Chair

Taumārere River Working Group

 

Cr G Crawford and Community Member as Co-Chairs (Alternate Cr J Carr)

Urban Whangārei Working Group

Cr J Craw as Chair

Awanui River Working Group

Cr J Carr as Chair (Alternate Cr P Jones)

 

8.         That the council confirms the following councillor portfolios:

Memberships / Delegation

Councillor

Appeals on Regional Plan

Cr A Macdonald

Kaipara Moana Working Party

Cr T Shortland and Cr P Jones

Northland Conservation Board

Cr G Crawford

Northland Sports Facilities Plan

(Sport Northland)

TBA at such time Sport Northland has confirmed its governance arrangements.

Shareholder representative for Northland Marsden Maritime Holdings Ltd

(delegating all necessary authority to represent the council’s interest including but not limited to exercising council’s vote at Annual General Meetings and giving effect to council’s shareholder resolutions).

Cr T Shortland

Shareholder representative for Northland Inc Ltd

(Delegating all necessary authority to represent the council’s interest including but not limited to exercising the council’s vote at Annual General Meetings and giving effect to council’s shareholder resolutions)

Cr P Jones

Shareholder representative on Regional Software Holdings Ltd.

(Delegating all necessary authority to represent the council’s interest including but not limited to exercising the council’s vote at Annual General Meetings and giving effect to council’s shareholder resolutions)

Cr T Shortland

Upper North Island Strategic Alliance (UNISA)

Cr T Shortland

Zone one (LGNZ)

Cr T Shortland

 

9.         That the appointments detailed in recommendations 7 and 8 above constitutes as the local authority’s business.  Hence appointed members can claim vehicle and travel time allowances.

10.       That the governance structure established at this meeting be reviewed for effectiveness and possible improvements after ten months of operation.

11.       That based on the allocation of responsibilities outlined in the body of this report and Attachment One  “Proposed New Governance Structure for the 2022-2025 Triennium”, that the pool for higher duties allowance of $580,951 be fully allocated as follows:

a)    That the Deputy Chair receives a higher duties allowance of $10,000, bringing the Deputy Chair total salary to $81,368.88.

b)    That remaining councillors receive a higher duties allowance of $17,658.88 each, bringing councillors total salary to $71,368.88.  This is based on the underpinning principle of council that additional duties will be apportioned in such a manner that there will be an equitable workload between councillors.

12.       That the higher duties allocation set out above (supplemented by the appropriate supporting information), be provided to the Remuneration Authority.

13.       That council appoints Councillor Simon Reid (principal) and Councillor Phil Halse (alternate) to represent the Whangarei District Council on the Regional Transport Committee[3] (noting that Far North and Kaipara District councils representatives will be brought to council for formal endorsement on receipt of nomination).

 

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Establish governance structure and appoint representatives as recommended

Retains “momentum” and allows ongoing workstreams to continue.

None apparent. With a review in ten months’ time there is an opportunity to refine the structure if necessary.

2

Delay establishing governance structure and appointing representative

Provides more time for new council to consider governance structure and who to appoint.

Important workstreams may lose momentum and cause unnecessary delays.  

 

The staff’s recommended option is 1 - to establish a governance structure and appoint representatives.

Considerations

1.    Significance and engagement

Given the administrative nature of the decisions being sought by this report, when assessed according to the council’s Significance Policy is deemed to be of low significance.

2.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

The activities detailed in this report are in accordance with the council’s decision making process and sections 76-82 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

Council’s governance structure provides the critical framework for council to deliver on its priorities and sets the foundation for robust discussion and decision making during the triennium which encompasses all the remaining considerations (Climate Impact, Environmental Impact, Community Views, Māori Impact Statement, Financial Implications and Implementation Implications are not applicable).

Background/Tuhinga                         

Following the election in October 2022 there have been several workshop discussions on options for council’s governance structure for the next three years in office.  Council now needs to resolve its preferred structure for the 2022-2025 Triennium.  Analysis of possible opportunities for improvement on the previous governance structure resulted in the following proposed governance structure.

 

Memberships and functions

The following membership and functions are proposed for each committee, subcommittee and working party.  Positions marked as “TBA” (to be appointed) indicate establishment of the position with the appointment yet to be confirmed.  Refer to the attachments to this report for the full terms of reference for each statutory committee, joint committee, subcommittee and working party. 

Except for the sub-committee delegations detailed below, all other decisions are made by the full council via a recommendation or series of recommendations from the relevant sub-committee, joint committee or working party.  For reasons of efficiency and/or expediency, should a subcommittee or working party not be able to perform their functions, the council will assume their role and responsibilities.

 

 

 

 

Statutory Committees

Te Oneroa-a-Tōhē-Board – Joint committee

Members:                Crs J Carr and P Jones

·    Oversee the implementation of the Beach Management Plan for Te-Oneroa-a-Tōhē (Ninety Mile Beach).

·    To provide governance and direction to all those who have a role in, or responsibility for, the Te Oneroa-a-Tohe management area, in order to protect and enhance environmental, economic, social, cultural, and spiritual well-being within that area for the benefit of present and future generations.

 

Civil Defence Emergency Management Committee

Member:                  Cr J Craw

Alternate:                 Cr R Stolwerk

·    Co-ordinate planning, programmes, and activities related to civil defence emergency management across the areas of reduction, readiness, response, and recovery;

·    Encourage co-operation and joint action within the Northland region.

 

Regional Transport Committee

Chair:                          Cr J Carr

Deputy Chair:          Cr J Blackwell

Alternate:                 Cr P Jones

·    Prepare Regional Land Transport Plan for council approval;

·    Liaise with appropriate road safety bodies and advise council on new initiatives;

·    Administer Total Mobility Scheme and report to council as appropriate; and

·    Prepare a Regional Public Transport Plan for council approval.

·    Recommend the required independent appointments for this committee.

 

Joint Committees

Joint Climate Change Committee

The Joint Climate Change Adaptation Committee is a standing committee made up of elected members from all the Northland councils and representatives from Northland hapū and iwi. 

Member:                   Cr A Macdonald

Alternate:                 Cr J Craw

NRC iwi/hapū representative:   TBA (previously Rihari Dargaville and Alternate Thomas Hohaia)

·    Provide direction and oversight of the development and implementation of climate change adaptation activities by local government in Te Taitokerau

·    Receive advice and provide direction and support to Climate Adaptation Te Taitokerau

·    Make recommendations to member councils to ensure a consistent regional approach is adopted to climate change adaptation activities

 

 

 

Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee

The Kaipara Moana Remediation Joint Committee consists of 6 appointed Kaipara Uri entities, three elected members appointed by Auckland Council and three elected members appointed by NRC.

Members:                             Crs J Blackwell, J Craw, A Macdonald

·    Provide stewardship and governance over the expenditure of the Crown Grant and council funding, as well as contributions from land-owners

·    Commissioning and approving remediation budgets and work-plans for the Kaipara Moana Remediation programme

 

Joint Regional Economic Development Committee

Members:                Crs P Jones, M Robinson

District Council Representation:            Two members from the Far North District Council and two members from the Kaipara District Council.

Make the decisions necessary as shareholders of Northland Inc (including the appointment of directors and the development of the Statement of Intent)

·    Make funding allocations from the Investment and Growth Reserve (including operational funding of Northland Inc). 

·     Receive advice and provide direction and support to economic development in Northland and makes recommendations to member councils to ensure a consistent regional approach.

Subcommittees

Investment and Property subcommittee

Chair:                          Cr R Stolwerk

Members:                Crs J Blackwell, J Craw, G Crawford, P Jones (Chair of A & R Subcommittee)

Independents:        J Erickson (Independent Consultant) and S Henderson (Independent Financial Advisor) and TBA (Independent Risk Advisor)

Māori Representation:     Two (2) Independent Tangata Whenua Members (TBA)

Ex officio:                  Chair T Shortland

·    Authority to move investment funds between managed funds within SIPO limits.

·    CEO delegation to withdraw and invest short term fund within established delegations.

·    Identify manager of new funds for approval by the full council.

·    No withdrawal of new funds except from the short term fund

·    Authority to authorise CEO to negotiate sale and purchase agreements for property within +/-5% of valuation.

 

Audit and Risk Subcommittee

Chair:                          Cr P Jones

Members:                Crs A Macdonald, Cr J Carr, Cr M Robinson, Cr R Stolwerk (Chair of I & P Subcommittee)

Independents:        S Henderson (independent Financial Advisor) and TBA (Independent Risk     Advisor)

Māori Representation:     Two (2) Independent Tangata Whenua Members (TBA).

Ex officio:                  Chair T Shortland

·    Make recommendation to council on risk management and health and safety matters

·    Monitor and review financial policies and financial performance.

·    Recommend new borrowing to council

·    Review corporate risk register and risk management plans

 

Working parties

Natural Resources Working Party

Chair:                          Cr A Macdonald

Members:                Crs J Carr, G Crawford, M Robinson

Māori Representation:    Four members of Te Taitokerau Māori and Council (TTMAC) Working Party (TBA).

Ex officio:                  Cr T Shortland

·    Provide oversight on activities that contribute to or influence the quality & quantity of water including land management and environmental monitoring.

·    Provide oversight on council’s resource management planning and regulatory activities.

·    Oversee the implementation of the Proposed Regional Plan.

·    Be the governance entity for the policy implementation of Essential Freshwater.

·    Make recommendations to council on appeals and recommendations to accept, adopt or reject private plan change applications.

 

Te Taitokerau Māori and Council (TTMAC) Working Party

Co-chairs:                  Cr M Robinson and 1 x member of TTMAC

Members:                All of Northland Regional Council councillors

Māori Representation:    21 Māori representatives

·    Monitor and advise on council’s compliance with its legislative obligations to Māori including under the Local Government Act 2002 and the Resource Management Act 1991.

·    Provide advice to council on topics referred to it by council.

·    Develop pathways (and processes) that will achieve lasting and meaningful relationships between Māori and council.

·    Ensure the views of Māori are taken into account in the exercise of council functions.

Biosecurity and Biodiversity Working Party

Chair:                          Cr G Crawford

Members:                Crs J Blackwell, J Craw, M Robinson

Māori Representation:    Four members of Te Taitokerau Māori and Council (TTMAC) Working Party (TBA).

Ex officio:                  Cr T Shortland

·    Provide oversight on council’s biosecurity and biodiversity activities.

·    Oversee the implementation of the Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP), Marine Pathway Plan (MPP) & regularly report progress to council.

 

WDC/NRC Whangārei Public Transport Working Party

NRC Members:                   Crs J Carr (Chair of RTC), J Craw, R Stolwerk

WDC Members                   3 x WDC Crs (TBA)

·    Provide oversight on Whangārei public transport issues with the intention of increasing patronage.

·    Oversee the integration of city and district planning in relation to public transport issues.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Proposed TOR Regional Transport Committe

Attachment 2: Proposed TOR Investment and Property Subcommittee

Attachment 3: Proposed TOR Audit and Risk Subcommittee

Attachment 4: Proposed TOR Natural Resources Working Party

Attachment 5: Proposed TOR Biosecurity and Biodiversity Working Party

Attachment 6: Proposed TOR Whangarei Public Transport Working Party

Attachment 7: TOR Te Taitokerau Maori and Council Working Party  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.1

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

Attachment: Proposed TOR Regional Transport Committe

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.1

22 November 2022Attachment 2

 

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

Attachment: Proposed TOR Investment and Property Subcommittee

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.1

22 November 2022Attachment 3

 

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

Attachment: Proposed TOR Audit and Risk Subcommittee

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.1

22 November 2022Attachment 4

 

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.1

22 November 2022Attachment 5

 

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.1

22 November 2022Attachment 6

 

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.1

22 November 2022Attachment 7

 

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Report: Confirmation of governance structure, membership and councillor portfolios

Attachment: TOR Te Taitokerau Maori and Council Working Party

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.2

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Annual Report on the Biosecurity Operational Plan

From:

Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity, on 17 November 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

The annual report on the Biosecurity Operational Plan 2021-2022 is a statutory requirement of the Biosecurity Act. The attached report highlights the substantial amount of work undertaken by the Biosecurity team, in partnership with tangata whenua, community groups, crown agencies and national initiatives such as Predator Free 2050.  The majority of performance targets have been achieved or achieved in part however the effects of covid and staff shortages has caused some disruption to delivery.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Annual Report on the Biosecurity Operational Plan’ by Don McKenzie, Pou Tiaki Pūtaiao - GM Biosecurity and dated 18 October 2022, be received.

2.         That council adopts the Biosecurity Annual Report as the record of actions undertaken during the 2021-2022 year and in accordance with the objectives of the Pest Management and Marine Pathway Management Plan 2017-2027.

3.         That the Biosecurity Group Manager be delegated authority to make any minor design, editing, grammatical or accuracy amendments, prior to the Annual Report being published.

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Council determines not to adopt the Annual Report

Provides an opportunity for changes in the way data are presented or other significant edits

Delays the production of a final copy for wider community and agency distribution.  Further extends the delay in meeting the statutory deadline of the end of November.

2

Council adopts the report

The report can be distributed to community and agency networks promptly.

NIL

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 2, that council adopt the Biosecurity Annual Report.  It is the intention of staff that the Annual Report and the results, once adopted by council, will form the basis for greater public engagement and promotion of the work council does with the community.

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

The effects of this report on climate change and the recommendations are expected to be neutral.          

       Environmental Impact

This decision is a statutory requirement concerning reporting and will have no direct impact on the environment.

2.    Community views

This decision is unlikely to have any impact on external agencies, Māori, and other interest groups.  They may, however, be interested in the content and have a view on the progress being made on the performance measures.

3.    Māori impact statement

This report relates to a council administrative matter and therefore does not have a direct impact on Māori.  Any potential impacts of future related decisions will be addressed in the relevant reports. 

4.    Financial implications

There are no financial implications of this decision, and the Annual Report has been produced            using current resourcing

5.    Implementation issues

While this decision concerns reporting on operational matters, as indicated above, it is intended that council will seek to communicate these results as broadly as possible so that our community has a good understanding of the work being undertaken.

6.    Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy.  It has previously been consulted on and provided for in council’s Long- Term Plan and/or is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

7.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

 This decision is consistent with the requirements of section 100b of the Biosecurity Act 1993.

Background/Tuhinga

Northland Regional Council is the management agency responsible for developing and implementing the Northland Regional Pest and Marine Pathway Management Plan 2017-2027 in accordance with the Biosecurity Act 1993 (hereafter referred to as the Pest Plan).  The Pest Plan is a combination of the eradication or effective management of specified pests (or groups of pests), and a marine pathway plan is designed to prevent and manage the spread of harmful marine organisms via boat hull fouling within Northland coastal waters.

 

An Operational Plan is prepared and reviewed annually as a requirement of the Biosecurity Act 1993 (section 100B).  It describes how the Pest Plan will be implemented for a given year and council has a statutory requirement under the Act to report on progress in the previous year by the end of November 2022.

This Annual Report on the Operational Plan 2021-2022 (attached) is the fourth produced under the 10-year Pest Plan.  The report notes progress made against aims, objectives and key performance indicators contained in the Operational Plan and expands on these where appropriate.

Summary of results

The report describes performance measures for each pest category and more than 75% have been achieved or achieved in part.  Performance measures that have not been achieved were due to covid causing delays, staff capacity issues which have since been addressed as part of the Long-Term Plan or involve measures where the data have not been available in the current year. 

The data shows that several event days and workshops for pest plants and animals as well as for kauri protection could not be held due to covid restrictions.  Although these events were reduced in number, 95 people attended weed workshops throughout the year and over 960 students received kauri protection training and a further 91 students attained NCEA credits as part of animal pest training.

Community pest control groups were still active when restrictions were lifted over the year and staff provided over 6,500 traps to customers and received more than 2,800 pest animal and 1,200 pest plant enquires.

The marine team exceeded the hull inspection target of 2,000 per annum and conducted marine pest workshops and stakeholder awareness training.  In addition, a strong partnership was formed last year and sustained through 2022 with Patuharakeke to undertake marine surveys and assist with training kaimahi in the early detection of marine pests being transported into high-risk marinas.

The Pest Control Hub data also shows more than 85,000 page views for all pest species up from 42,000 the previous year, and across the key themes of biosecurity including Plant, Animal, Disease, Freshwater and Marine. 

Partnerships with other agencies such as the Ministry for Primary Industries, Department of Conservation and Predator Free 2050 were sustained and over $4M of external agency funding was received to support new and existing projects.  In addition, the number of bicultural collaborations with iwi, hapū and whanau saw more than ten partnerships either start or continue to strengthen across marine, kauri protection, wilding pine control, animal, and pest plant biosecurity.

The increased interest in biosecurity activities is evidence that Northlanders are seeking more information on what kinds of pest management services are available and how they can be involved. It also reflects the growing awareness of national campaigns such as “Predator Free 2050”, and regional initiatives like the “Kiwi Coast”.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Annual Report on the Biosecurity Operational Plan 2021 2022  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.2

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.3

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Regional Rates Collection - update to 30 September 2022

From:

Simon Crabb, Finance Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 10 November 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

The three district councils administer the collection of the regional council rates on our behalf.  The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the collection of this year’s current rates and the rate arrears owing to the regional council by each district council.

 

Table One below summarises the level of rates collected in the first quarter of the 2022/23 financial year and the total outstanding rate balances at 30 September 2022.

 

 

Overall, the three district councils collected a total of 31% of our annual rate strike in the three months to 30 September 2022.  As a comparative, 32% was collected for the same period in the prior financial year.

 

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Regional Rates Collection - update to 30 September 2022’ by Simon Crabb, Finance Manager and dated 3 November 2022, be received.

 

 

Background/Tuhinga

Whangārei District Council (WDC)

The Whangārei District Council collected 36.2% of our annual rate strike to the end of September of this financial year (2021/22: 36.9%). 

21% ($130k) of the WDC outstanding rate arrears balance (2021/22: 22%; $120k) was also collected in the first three months of this financial year resulting in a closing rate arrears balance (excluding outstanding current year rates) still to be collected of $488k.

 

 

 

WDC advised:

 

 “they received $100,000 on the 30th (and had reported up to 29th) which did reduce arrears slightly compared to last year. We are trying new ways of contacting debtors and in October sent emails to 632 debtors that we found email addresses for rather than posting letters. This has had a positive reaction.

 

Kaipara District Council (KDC)

The Kaipara District Council collected 28.2% of our annual rate strike to the end of September of this financial year (2021/22: 29%). 

8.5% ($74k) of the KDC outstanding rate arrears balance (2021/22: 10.3%; $88k) has also been collected in the first three months of this financial year resulting in a closing total rate arrears balance (excluding outstanding current year rates) still to be collected of $803k.

 

The KDC Rates Manager was unavailable for comment as she is on leave until 28th November 2022.

 

Far North District Council (FNDC)

The Far North District Council has collected 23.6% of our annual rate strike to the end of September of this financial year, (2021/22: 26.1%). 

5.6% ($175k) of the FNDC outstanding rate arrears balance has also been collected in the first three months of this financial year, (2021/22: 7.6%; $189k), resulting in a closing rate arrears balance (excluding outstanding current year rates) still to be collected of $2.9m. 

FNDC advised:

“Last year’s collection activities were different for both current rates and rate arrears which can account for the lower percentage. The Revenue recovery team started mortgage demand pre-calling mid-July 2021 and on August 17, when the country moved into the Delta lockdown, the team made calls to many customers who had not paid their first instalment and those who would normally pay at the front counter. This year, due to team members leaving and taking sick leave, mortgage demand pre-calling did not commence until the middle of August and did not include calls to those who had not paid their first instalment

We will continue to monitor and schedule post instalment due date calling this month for those who have not paid Q1 and Q2 instalments.”

 

Attachment 1 is the revenue and collections report provided by FNDC outlining the actions they have in place to collect outstanding rate arrears.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: FNDC Revenue and Collections Report - Q1 2022-23 Rating Year  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.3

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

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Report: Regional Rates Collection - update to 30 September 2022

Attachment: FNDC Revenue and Collections Report - Q1 2022-23 Rating Year

Page: 1


 

 

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Report: Regional Rates Collection - update to 30 September 2022

Attachment: FNDC Revenue and Collections Report - Q1 2022-23 Rating Year

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.4

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation

From:

Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Ruben Wylie, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 17 November 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

This report seeks retrospective approval of a submission lodged on behalf of council under delegated authority. The submission was approved under delegated authority to the Executive Leadership Team because the matter was considered to be of significance to the region and to have implications for council functions, however the consultation period did not enable it to be considered at a formal council meeting (the submission period closed 18 November 2022). Council Delegations Manual requires that submissions lodged under delegated authority by the Executive Leadership Team must undergo retrospective approval by council.

 

The submission relates to government proposals to include exotic carbon forestry within scope of the National Environmental Standards for Plantation Forestry (NES-PF). The rationale for the change is to ensure exotic carbon forestry is subject to appropriate controls to manage adverse effects given there are very limited council rules applied to this land use and it is currently exempt from the NES-PF – there is also significant potential for expansion of exotic carbon forestry as a result of rising carbon prices. The consultation document also proposes other changes to better manage wildfire risk and technical adjustments to existing NES-PF provisions to better manage both exotic plantation and carbon forestry. 

 

The submission is attached (Attachment 1). It is recommended that council retrospectively approve the submission.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation’ by Justin Murfitt, Strategic Policy Specialist and dated 1 November 2022, be received.

2.         That council retrospectively approve the Attached submission on National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation.

 

Options

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Council retrospectively approves the submission

The government is able to take council’s views into consideration

Council is seen to be representing the region on central government initiatives

None

2

Council does not approve the submission

None

The submission would have to be formally withdrawn and government would not put any weight on the points made.

 

3

Council seeks changes to the submission and that it is re-submitted to government.

Unclear

The amended submission may not be accepted after the consultation has closed and government may not put any weight on the points made

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1.

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

The subject matter relates to the management of exotic plantation and carbon forestry at a national scale and is therefore relevant to both climate change mitigation and adaption. While the government proposals could affect regional responses to climate change once enacted, the lodging of a submission on the proposals does not in itself materially affect council’s roles and functions or the ability respond to climate change issues.

2.    Environmental Impact

The subject matter relates to the management of exotic plantation and carbon forestry at a national scale and is therefore relevant to the management of environmental effects in the region and has implications for council functions.  However, the lodging of a submission on the government proposals does not in itself materially affect council’s roles and functions. If the government’s proposed options proceed, it is likely to result in greater control over the environmental effects associated with exotic plantation and carbon forestry. 

3.    Community views

Exotic forestry is known to be of interest in the region given it is a common land use important for social and economic well-being but can also generate adverse effects. There have also been concerns raised about land use change as a result of strong economic incentives for carbon forestry and loss of productive farming land. There are likely to be diverse community views on the subject matter but council lodging a submission on the government proposals will not materially affect communities and council can be seen to be representing the interest of the region. Individuals can also lodge submissions reflecting their own interests.

4.    Māori impact statement

Exotic forestry is known to be of interest to Māori both in terms of an existing and / or potential land use option, but also in terms of potential environmental impacts in some cases.  While there are likely to be diverse views on the subject matter, the opportunity presented by exotic carbon forestry is known to be of particular interest to Māori in Te Taitokerau, however council lodging a submission on the government proposals will not materially affect Māori. Māori also have the opportunity to lodge submissions on the government proposals reflecting their own point of view.

 

5.    Financial implications

While there are implications for council if the government proposals proceed, there are no financial implications associated with council lodging a submission on the proposals or relating to council’s retrospective approval.

6.    Implementation issues

While there are implications for council if the government proposals proceed, there are no financial implementation issues associated with council lodging a submission on the proposals or relating to council’s retrospective approval of the submission.

7.    Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because it is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

There are no material policy or legislative compliance risks associated with council lodging a submission on the government proposals or relating to council’s retrospective approval of the submission.

Background/Tuhinga

In October 2022 the Government released a consultation document on options to better manage exotic forestry using national direction under the Resource management Act 1991 (RMA). A key proposal is to make exotic carbon forestry subject to the National Environmental Standards for Plantation Forestry (NES-PF), which applies controls on a range of plantation forestry activities to manage adverse environmental effects. 

 

The rationale for the change is that there is currently a regulatory gap in the RMA for the management of exotic carbon forestry as a land use. Currently the NES-PF only applies to production forestry (i.e. forestry with a harvest component) and typically district and regional plans are silent on this land use. A related issue is that higher carbon prices could lead to a significant expansion of exotic carbon farming as a land use without adequate controls on location or ongoing management.

 

The consultation document also proposes other amendments to the NES-PF to better manage wildfire risk and technical amendments to improve the functionality of existing controls in the NES-PF.

 

The subject matter is of interest to council and the region generally as forestry is a widespread land use in Te Taitokerau and soil conservation / sediment mitigation is a key element of council activity. The proposals would (in the view of staff), enable greater control over the location and management of exotic carbon forestry, which currently falls into a regulatory gap given it is exempt from the NES-PF regulations and there are no controls on afforestation for exotic carbon forestry in district or regional plans. This is despite the fact that many of the environmental effects of exotic carbon forestry can be similar to plantation forestry and there is a need to ensure afforestation and associated activity is managed appropriately (such as controls on setbacks from waterways, earthworks, river crossings and management of wilding tree risk).

 

The timing of the consultation coincided with local government elections and council induction meaning the matter could not be considered at a formal council meeting – submissions closed 18 November 2022.  Staff therefore developed a draft submission on the consultation generally in support of the government proposals. The draft submission was circulated to councillors for comment prior to being approved under delegated authority to the Executive Leadership Team (Refer Attachment 1). The delegation requires that council retrospectively approve the submission. This report recommends that council approve the attached submission in retrospect.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: NRC submission on National direction for exotic forestry  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.4

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

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Report: Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation

Attachment: NRC submission on National direction for exotic forestry

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Report: Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation

Attachment: NRC submission on National direction for exotic forestry

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Report: Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation

Attachment: NRC submission on National direction for exotic forestry

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Report: Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation

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Report: Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation

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Report: Council submission - National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 7.5

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Council submissions - Draft Kaipara District Plan and Far North District Plan

From:

Ingrid Kuindersma, Policy Planner

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Ruben Wylie, Pou Tiaki Taiao – Group Manager Environmental Services, on 02 November 2022

 

Executive summary/Whakarāpopototanga

The Council Delegations Manual requires that submissions approved under delegated authority must be retrospectively authorised by council. This report seeks retrospective approval of submissions on the Proposed Far North District Plan and the Draft Kaipara District Plan lodged on behalf of council under delegated authority. The content of the submissions was discussed in a workshop with the previous council and draft documents were circulated for comment, however, timeframes did not allow for approval at a formal council meeting.

 

Recommendation(s)

1.         That the report ‘Council submissions - Draft Kaipara District Plan and Far North District Plan’ by Ingrid Kuindersma, Policy Planner and dated 2 November 2022, be received.

2.         That council retrospectively approve the attached submissions on the Draft Kaipara District Plan and the Proposed Far North District Plan

 

 

Options

 

No.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1

Council retrospectively approves the submission

The district councils receive NRCs input on drafting their district plans. in a manner that is consistent with regional issues.

None

2

Council does not approve the submission

None

The submission points would need to be formally withdrawn and the district councils would not be able to consider the matters raised.

3

Council seeks changes to the submission.

Uncertain

The only changes likely to be accepted would be the withdrawal of parts of the submission.

 

The staff’s recommended option is Option 1

Considerations

1.    Climate Impact

The submissions reference climate change and suggest some changes to the way the district plans are addressing this issue, however, lodging the submissions with not materially affect NRCs response to climate change.

2.    Environmental Impact

The content of the submissions addresses the potential environmental impacts related to the wording of the district plan, however, lodging the submissions will not materially impact NRC’s roles and functions.

3.    Community views

Council’s submissions are intended to advocate for the interests of the region.  Both district plans have been the subject of mandatory public consultation and therefore individuals in the community have had the opportunity of raise matters relating to their own interest.

4.    Māori impact statement

Issues of interest to Māori are discussed in the submission documents, however, the lodgement of this submissions will not materially affect Māori.  Māori have also had the opportunity to lodge submissions raising their own matters of importance. 

5.    Financial implications

There are not considered to be any financial implications associated with the lodgement or retrospective approval of

6.    Implementation issues

There are not considered to be any implementation issues with lodgement or retrospective approval of the submissions.

 

7.    Significance and engagement

In relation to section 79 of the Local Government Act 2002, this decision is considered to be of low significance when assessed against council’s significance and engagement policy because it is part of council’s day to day activities.  This does not mean that this matter is not of significance to tangata whenua and/or individual communities, but that council is able to make decisions relating to this matter without undertaking further consultation or engagement.

8.    Policy, risk management and legislative compliance

There are no material policy or legislative compliance risks associated with council lodging a submission on the government proposals or relating to council’s retrospective approval of the submission.

 

Background/Tuhinga

In late July, Kaipara District Council released their Draft District Plan and Far North District Council released their Proposed District Plan.  A workshop was held with the previous council on the 30 August to outline the plan provisions and seek guidance on the content of the submissions.  It was agreed that draft submissions be circulated to councillors and TTMAC for comment but due to timeframes the submissions would be lodged under delated authority.  Both submissions have subsequently been lodged under delegated authority to the Planning and Policy Manager (Refer Attachments 1 and 2). The delegation requires that council retrospectively approve the submission. This report recommends that council approve the attached submissions in retrospect.

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Feedback on Draft Kaipara District Plan

Attachment 2: Proposed Far North District Plan submission  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.5

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

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Report: Council submissions - Draft Kaipara District Plan and Far North District Plan

Attachment: Feedback on Draft Kaipara District Plan

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Council Meeting  ITEM: 7.5

22 November 2022Attachment 2

 

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 8.1

22 November 2022

 

TITLE:

Health and safety report

From:

Beryl Steele, Human Resources Manager

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Bruce Howse, Pou Taumatua – Group Manager Corporate Services, on 15 November 2022

 

Whakarāpopototanga / Executive summary

This report is to inform the council of the activity in Health and Safety for the period July - September 2022.   

 

An overview/summary of the report includes: 

·           A new Health and Safety Advisor is due to start in October. Not having this role filled has had a significant impact on the health and safety work programme. 

·           Health and safety inductions for new staff are still below expected targets.   

·           Incidents of staff speeding remain the highest reported incidents.  

·           Overall numbers of incidents/hazards (excluding speeding) are trending up, however these remain low. 

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Health and safety report’ by Beryl Steele, Human Resources Manager and dated 25 October 2022, be received.

 

 

Background/Tuhinga

 

1.         Health and safety performance

A summary of the health and safety performance for the period July - September 2022 is shown in Table 1 below. 

·   A review of health and safety systems including an audit remains on hold until the new Health and Safety Advisor starts.

·   An external audit of all Health and Safety processes and policies is being scoped. This is anticipated to occur once the new Health and Safety Advisor starts.

·   The numbers of completed health and safety inductions for new staff remain below performance targets. This is a combination of the target being set based on the whole H&S induction being completed in the first two days and not being booked into people’s diaries.  Aspects of the induction cannot always be completed within the first two days.  We are now separating out the aspects that must be completed in the first two days and this part of the induction is being booked into the H&S representative’s and new employee’s calendars.  This will see a substantial improvement in the induction figures in Table 1.  Managers are fully aware that a staff member is not allowed to perform their duties until the relevant health and safety training is provided.

·   Training undertaken for the period included Comprehensive First Aid, Outdoor First Aid, 4-wheel driving and electric fishing.

·   There is one outstanding incident investigation from the 2021-2022 financial year. This is being handled by the Health and Safety Committee.

 

 

Table 1: Health and safety performance lead and lag indicators July 2022 to September 22

*Based on calendar year

 

2.         Risk management

As of the end of September 2022, there are 90 risks listed in the NRC Health and Safety Risk Register. Table 2 below shows the top ten risks for the organisation, identified by their residual risk score. Residual risk scores are calculated after all controls have been put in place, and are between one and 25.

 

Risk Updates

·   There have been no new risks added to the Health and Safety Risk Register since the previous reporting period.

·   There have been no changes to the top ten risks over the three month period from July – September 2022.

·   Extended workload/stress risk has been reviewed. It was identified that the controls/mitigation strategies are not working, and the the residual risk score has increased from nine to 12.

·   The risk register is still in the process of being transferred to Promapp.

 

Table 2: Top ten Health and Safety risks as at 30 September 2022

Risk

Residual risk score

Working with Contractors

16

COVID-19 pandemic

16

Extended workload/stress

12

Dealing with aggressive people – psychological harm

10

Workplace bullying and harassment

Note: This due to potential risk, not high numbers

9

Sedentary work - working at computers and laptops (including both in the office, and at home)

8

Working under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol

8

Slips, trips, and falls

8

Driving motor vehicles – accident related events causing injury or other trauma

8

 

 

3.         Injuries, incidents, and hazards

26 events were reported by staff for the whole of the July 2021 – September 2022 period. Additionally, 33 speeding events were reported for the same period, two from speeding tickets and the remaining picked up by Eroad units in vehicles.  Figure 1 below shows injury/incident related events, as compared to hazard related events, for the previous 12 months month.  Note that from July 2022, speeding events have been classified as injury/ incident related, rather than hazard related.

Numbers of incidents/hazards or near misses reported by staff are increasing after a slump in July, however these are still low relative to the type of work council staff undertake.  Staff are continually encouraged to report minor events, as these help to build the picture of the type of work NRC engages in and help with correctly assigning the associated risks.

 

Figure 1: Number of hazard and injury/incident related events for the previous 12 months

 

Events reported

Incidents, hazards and near misses that are reported are assigned a risk description. Figure 2 below shows all event types (based on risk description) for the July 2021 – September 2022 quarter. The top two event types for this period, excluding speeding, were slips trips or falls and aggressive customer. The first reflects an increase in staff reporting events that occur out in the field, and is indicative of the number of staff who spend time in the field.

The second is a reflection of the number of staff in front-facing roles being encouraged to report instances of negative or difficult interations.

 

Figure 2: Event types reported for July – September 2022

Figure 3 below shows the top ten event types for the 12 month period from October 2021 – September 2022. Vehicle speeding continues to be the most common event reported. This includes speed camera tickets issued, and E-road reports where vehicles were recorded travelling over the speed limit (excluding areas where speed limits change). The Health and Safety Committee are reviewing speeding events and how they are followed up.

Note: From August 2022 onwards, E-road reports are for vehicles travelling 10+ km over the speed limit. Prior to this, reports are for vehicles travelling 20+ km over the speed limit.

Figure 3: Top event types for previous 12 months

 

Events of interest

Note: the events of interest only detail high risk events, or events which affect large groups of people.

The following events are events of interest from the quarter July 2021 – September 2022.

·    Regular visitors to NRC were not signing into the building. This was raised with reception and the visitors informed that they needed to sign in.

·    There was one security event where a member of the public was able to access staff only areas of the Water Street building. Changes to building security and identification of staff/visitors/contractors is underway.

·    Three events where staff members had difficult/aggressive phone calls with members of the public.

·    Five events where field staff tripped, slipped or fell while out in the field.

 

4.         Health and safety strategy work programme

The Health and Safety strategy work programme has been on hold in the absence of a Health and Safety Advisor. The new Health and Safety Advisor starts in October 2022 and it is expected that a work programme will be developed (with the help of the Health and Safety Committee) in the coming months.

 

5.         Legislative changes

Nil

 

 

 

Attachments/Ngā tapirihanga

Attachment 1: Health and safety - performance towards strategy  

 


Council Meeting  ITEM: 8.1

22 November 2022Attachment 1

 

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Council Meeting                                                                                                                                                         item: 8.2

22 November 2022

g

 

TITLE:

Chief Executive’s Report to Council

From:

Jonathan Gibbard, Tāhūhū Rangapū - Chief Executive Officer

Authorised by Group Manager/s:

Jonathan Gibbard, Tāhūhū Rangapū  - Chief Executive Officer, on 17 November 2022

 

Ngā mahi tūtohutia / Recommendation

That the report ‘Chief Executive’s Report to Council’ by Jonathan Gibbard, Tāhūhū Rangapū  - Chief Executive Officer and dated 13 October 2022, be received.

 

 

8.2.1   Highlights

 

FIF Dunes Lake Project

Lake vegetation surveys were completed at Lakes Tutaki, Egg and Mt Camel North with traces of hornwort found in Tutaki and Mt Camel North.  If possible, the lakes will be treated again prior to Christmas.  Monitoring will continue and treatments will proceed if required next year. Various education days have been held throughout the region in the past 2 months with around 1000 students having attended since 2019.  Ngā Roto Tapokapoka tūhono wānanga will take place in February 2023.  Tech fishing at Lake Kapoai took place in October with 201 fish removed.  An automatic fish feeder has been built to improve fishing results this summer.

 

CoastCare

Several CoastCare planting days were held in September and early October, closing the planting season for the year.  Numerous volunteers in Bream Bay, Korou Kore, Mitimiti, Matapōuri and Taipa turned up to plant spinifex and pingao and provide protection for the dunes.  The plants and materials were provided by NRC CoastCare.  The focus has now moved to protecting the dunes and wildlife that live and breed in the dune sand beaches from the influx of summer visitors.

 

Air quality

A paper titled “Identifying Hotspots and Targeting Monitoring Locations Within Northland’s Priority Airsheds” was presented at Clean Air Society of Australia and New Zealand’s 26th International Clean Air and Environment Conference in Adelaide, South Australia.  The paper was co-authored by council’s Air Quality Scientist and Pattle Delamore Partners (PDP) and jointly presented.  The presentation won the most “innovative presentation” award of the conference.

 

Ngāti Kuri Wānanga  

Representatives from NRC hosted the Ngāti Kuri taiao unit for a three-day wānanga in Whangarei. Multiple staff from across NRC showcased the tools and techniques they use to monitor the environment. As many of the marine biosecurity activities were completed in the rohe of Patuharakeke, members from the Patuharakeke Te Iwi Trust were also invited along to participate in these activities. The wānanga concluded with discussions on how NRC staff and Ngāti Kuri can work together to co-develop a marine biosecurity work plan for their taiao unit.  

 

8.2.2   CEO’s Office

Current Legal Proceedings

Department

Description

Status

Consent decision appeal

Two separate consent applications for replacement and new consents relating to a proposed expansion of, Doug’s Opua Boat Yard in Walls Bay, Ōpua

Environment Court appeal hearing scheduled for 22-23 November 2022.

Consent decision appeal

Irrigation of avocado orchards and horticulture crops

Environment Court issued an interim decision on 7 July 2022 stating that consents could be “granted with appropriate conditions”.  The Court directed that all parties file a memo by 28 October 2022 advising whether they have agreed to conditions, with the court to proceed to issue a full decision, or have the opportunity to provide further conditions to the court.  All parties opted for the last option.  The Court has agreed and directed parties to report back by mid February 2023.

 


 

8.2.3   CORPORATE SERVICES

 

Enterprise System Update

 

Fraud Declaration

I am not aware of any fraud nor am I investigating any incidence or suspected incidence of fraud at this time.

 

Council Property Update

·    NIWA were able to fill the southern side of the system with seawater during the week commencing 24 October to enable commissioning to commence. Pumps are operating to expectations. The northern side was to be filled mid-November. The overall completion mid‐December is still realistic assuming no major issues during commissioning. Council may be invited to invest further in the Project. The most recent H&S inspection was undertaken by Construct Health Ltd on the 4 October 2022 with a score of 96.96%.

·    Council has agreed a license to occupy with KMR who will initially have up to four staff working from the Kaipara Service Centre offices.

 

Internal water treatment area

 

 

 

 

 

 

South elevation

 

 

Legal Proceedings

NRC has issued summary judgment proceedings against four mooring licence holders for non-payment of marine biosecurity fees.  Three of the debtors have been served, with one of those proceedings/debtors coming before the Court on 25 October, where there was a challenge as to jurisdiction.  The Court did not accept the debtor’s challenge to jurisdiction and directed NRC’s summary judgment application be set down for hearing in the District Court (date to be confirmed), noting that it would essentially be a test case for NRC’s other debtor proceedings.   The other three debtors/proceedings are scheduled to come before the Court for their ‘first call’ on 21 December 2022.

 

Regional Accessibility Strategy – Making Te Tai Tokerau accessible 

Northland has one of the highest rates of disability combined with a high number of older adults and young children, a growing number of migrants from non-English speaking background, and a high level of illiteracy. 

 

In May 2019, the Chief Executive Forum raised the possibility of developing a region-wide disability (now accessibility) strategy for Northland. The purpose of the strategy would be to enable people with access needs to live, work, play, visit and participate across our communities, in a more inclusive and equitable way. The community will see this mahi framed as Making Te Tai Tokerau accessible.

 

A cross-council working group, comprising staff representatives from the three district councils and NRC, have been working to advance development of an accessibility plan, which may be a strategy or other initiative.  Work to date has included:

·    Seeking feedback from the Disability Advisory Group, on the process of strategy/plan development and subsequent action plans. 

·    A survey asking people with access needs to assess how well their local council were doing to help their district be accessible.   Results showed only 17% of respondents thought that councils were doing a good job at accessibility.  Inadequate footpaths, insufficient public transport and lack of understanding of accessibility issues were common themes across all four councils. 

·    A survey to gain insight from staff across all four councils on accessibility found a strong desire to improve accessibility. However, staff felt a strong lack of guidance, support and resource on how to achieve this in their work practices. 

 

The working group have now developed a campaign of community engagement to gather more in-depth information from access needs communities.  The campaign allows the four Northland councils to collectively seek feedback on how to make Te Taitokerau more accessible for people with access needs.  The campaign is focused on people with access needs rather than service providers, organisations or professional caregivers.

 

Four primary engagement methods are being used:

·    A digital platform where people can fill out a survey, share ideas, or chat with others in an online forum. 

·    Guidance and feedback booklets that can be filled out by individuals or in a group. These are screen reader friendly and available in large print in plain text, Easy Read, and te reo Māori formats.  The booklets are also available in NZSL via NZSL | Infowave.  

·    Group feedback – using existing support groups for people with access needs designed to make people feel comfortable when giving feedback.  These sessions will be structured around the booklets, which are designed for individuals and groups to work through.  

·    Limited public workshops, run on an on-demand basis. 

 

The engagement was launched on 27 October, and will run through until the end of February.

 

Once the engagement has been carried out, feedback will be analysed and a plan or strategy drafted in conjunction with a group of stakeholders from the access needs community.

 

NRC approved funding in their 2021 Long Term Plan for implementation of a strategy, which is budgeted from 2023/24 onwards.  It is anticipated that the feedback received through the engagement process will assist in determining the best use of these funds.

 

8.2.4   regulatory services

 

Consents in Process

During September and October 2022, a total of 309 Decisions were issued.  These decisions comprised:

 

September 2022 (187)

 

October 2022 (122)

 

Ÿ Moorings

4

Ÿ Coastal Permits

19

Ÿ Coastal Permits

25

Ÿ Coastal Discharge Permits

1

Ÿ Air Discharge Permits

1

Ÿ Land Discharge Permits

8

Ÿ Land Discharge Permits

18

Ÿ Land Use Consents

37

Ÿ Water Discharge Permits

2

Ÿ Water Permits

19

Ÿ Land Use Consents

98

Ÿ Water Takes

34

Ÿ Water Permits

31

Ÿ Bore Consents

4

Ÿ Water Takes

1

 

 

Ÿ Bore Consents

7

 

 

 

The processing timeframes for the September 2022 consents ranged from:

Ÿ 351 to 2 calendar days, with the median time being 53 days;

Ÿ 183 to 2 working days, with the median time being 32 days.

 

The processing timeframes for the October 2022 consents ranged from:

Ÿ 827 to 2 calendar days, with the median time being 71 days;

Ÿ 174 to 2 working days, with the median time being 45 days.

Thirty-nine applications were received in September 2022.

Fifty-two applications were received in October 2022.

Of the 134 applications in progress at the end of October 2022:

Ÿ 37 were received more than 12 months ago;

Reasons for being more than 12 months old:

-    Awaiting additional information (including CIAs)

8

-    Consultation with affected parties/stakeholders

7

-    On-hold pending new rules becoming operative

4

-    Other

18

Ÿ 17 were received between 6 and 12 months ago (most awaiting further information from the applicant);

Ÿ 80 less than 6 months.

 

Appointment of Hearing Commissioners

No commissioners were appointed in September 2022.

The following commissioners were appointed in October 2022 for one consent hearing:

·    Ms Sharon McGarry and Ms Juliane Chetham for consents associated with the ongoing operation of the Kohukohu and Opononi/Ōmāpere Wastewater Treatment Plants.  The hearing is scheduled for 20 February 2023.

 

Consents Decisions and Progress on Notified Applications in Process, Objections and Appeals

The current level of notified application processing activities at the end of October 2022 is (by number):

Ÿ Applications Publicly/Limited Notified During Previous Month

1

Ÿ Progress on Applications Previously Notified

7

Ÿ Hearings and Decisions

0

Ÿ Appeals/Objections

2

 

COMPLIANCE MONITORING

The results of compliance monitoring for the period 1 September – 31 October 2022 (and year-to-date figures) are summarised in the following table and discussed below.

Classification

Total

Full compliance

Low risk non-compliance

Moderate non-compliance

Significant non-compliance

Not exercised during period

Air Discharge

58

56

0

0

0

2

Bore Consent

6

5

1

0

0

0

Coastal Discharge

20

14

2

4

0

0

Coastal Permit

51

36

11

3

1

0

FDE – Discharge permit

183

154

0

18

5

6

FDE – Permitted activity

59

50

0

6

2

1

Land Discharge

157

127

13

7

3

7

Land Use Consent

101

86

11

0

0

4

Water Discharge

103

74

9

13

3

4

Water Permit

95

85

5

2

0

3

Water Take

192

129

25

20

0

18

Total

1025

816

77

73

14

45

Percentage

 

79.6%

7.5%

7.1%

1.4%

4.4%

Year to date

2231

1668

227

188

27

121

Percentage

 

74.8%

10.2%

8.4%

1.2%

5.4%

 

Coastal

There were ongoing routine coastal permit inspections of structures in the Bay of Islands. The newly approved coastal structure activity permitted rules are being implemented. Enforcement action has been taken for the placement of an illegal tyre seawall at Tinopai. Sediment and water quality monitoring of the boating club in Matauwhi Bay, the Bay of Islands boatyard (Ōpua) and Sport Northland (Hātea River) were undertaken in September and October. 

 

Water, Waste, Air and Land Use (WWALU) Compliance Monitoring

Ÿ Contaminated Land Management

Twelve incidents involving the discharge of hazardous substances and 25 enquiries regarding contaminated land were received and responded to. Seven hundred and five kilograms of hazardous waste was disposed of at the amnesty days, and 16 sites were added to the Selected Land-Use Register.

 

·   Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants 

WWTP/Consent Status

Issues (September 2022)

Enforcement Action/Response

Far North District

Ahipara

Expires 30 November 2033

Ongoing non-compliance with bacteriological consent limits

Under AN

FNDC investigating land disposal options

UV system to be installed in 2022/2023 to reduce bacteriological concentrations

Hihi

Expires 30 November 2022; replacement consent application received

No recent issues

None currently

Kāeo

Expires 31 October 2022; replacement consent application received

No recent issues

None currently

Kaikohe

Expired 2021 (replacement consent application on hold)

Intermittent non-compliances with ADW flow, ammonia and bacteriological consent limits

None currently

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent

Kaitaia

Expired 2021; information for public notification of replacement consent application being finalised

No recent issues

Under AN (reticulation overflows)

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent

Kawakawa

Expires 2036

No recent issues

None currently

Kerikeri

Expires 2036

No recent issues

 

None currently

Kohukohu

Expired 2016; replacement consent application hearing scheduled for March 2023

Occasional issues with bacteriological conditions of consent

None currently

Opononi and Ōmāpere

Expired 2019; replacement consent application hearing scheduled for March 2023

Non-compliances with bacteriological consent limits

 

Under AN

Issues will be addressed in replacement consent

Paihia

Expires 2034

Plant upgraded 2019; alkalinity issues preventing optimal ammonia treatment

None currently

Alkalinity improvement project to optimise ammonia treatment still in progress

Rangiputa

Expires 2032

No recent issues

None currently

Rāwene

Expires 2023

System overdue for de-sludging

None currently

Russell

Expires 2024

Occasional non-compliances with E. coli consent limit post UV

Under AN

Infringement notices issued January 2022 and June 2022

Improvements underway

Taipā

Expires 2029

No recent issues

None currently

Whatuwhiwhi

Expires 2025

Elevated TSS levels (consent limit may be unnecessarily restrictive)

Under AN for odour from Tokerau Beach pump station

Whangarei District

Hikurangi

Expires 2025

Intermittent issues with plant performance resulting in non-compliance with water quality parameters

Plant performance being reviewed to identify improvements

Ngunguru

Expires 2035

No recent issues

None currently

Okakura

Expires 2025

Occasional spikes in E. coli

None currently

Portland

Expires 2024

No recent issues

None currently

Ruakākā

Expires 2046

No recent issues

None currently

Tutukaka

Expires 2024

No recent issues

None currently

Waiotira

Expires 2030

No recent issues

None currently

Waipū

Expires 2030

No recent issues

None currently

Whangārei City

Expired 30 April 2022; replacement consent application publicly notified; WDC awaiting response from one remaining submitter wishing to be heard

No recent issues

Under AN for odour from plant

Kaipara District

Dargaville

Expired 30 June 2022; decision on replacement consent application due to be released soon

Non-compliances with water quality parameters and discharge volume

Under AN

Glinks Gully

Expires 2024

No recent issues

None currently

Kaiwaka

Expired 31 October 2022; replacement consent application received; additional information being prepared prior to public notification

No recent issues

None currently

Mangawhai

Expires 2042

Odour complaints and occasional exceedances of TDS consent limit

Under AN

Maungaturoto

Expires 2032

Intermittent non-compliances generally due to high rainfall

Under AN

Te Kopuru

Expires 2044

Intermittent minor non-compliances with water quality parameters

 

Environmental Incidents

No environmental incidents closed in September and October resulted in a significant environmental impact.

 

ENFORCEMENT

Abatement Notices, Infringement Notices and Formal Warnings

The following is a summary of the abatement and infringement notices issued:

Action Type

Number

Abatement Notice

37

Infringement Notice

30

 

Farm dairy effluent (FDE) monitoring

FDE inspections commenced on 22 July 2022.  NRC staff and the FDE contractor will be visiting a total of 753 farms this monitoring season (4 less than last year).  To date approximately 54% of farms have been visited and reported on.  Comparisons of this season’s results so far with those for last season are given in the tables below. 

 

Consented farms (571 farms)

Full Compliance

Moderate Non-Compliance

Significant Non-Compliance

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

271

307

55

70

13

11

80%

79%

16%

18%

4%

3%

 

 

Non-consented farms (182 farms)

Full Compliance

Moderate Non-Compliance

Significant Non-Compliance

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

This Year

Last Year

102

106

16

27

6

7

82%

76%

13%

19%

5%

5%

 

Other Enforcement

·    Open burning on industrial/trade property – Whangārei

Two charges were laid against an individual for open burning on industrial/trade premises; the burnt items included prohibited items. The defendant was convicted on both charges on 15 September 2022 and fined $15,520.

·    Breach of enforcement orders - Kaitāia

On 28 June 2022, NRC commenced prosecution against an individual for the breach of enforcement orders. The enforcement orders included remedial work on a contaminated land which also required a resource consent. The resource consent application was lodged on 5 October 2022. On 18 October 2022, the defendant pledged guilty, and Judge granted adjournment to allow the defendant to complete the work required by the enforcement orders. The next court appearance is 24 January 2023 to report on the work progress and to proceed with sentencing.

·    Earthworks & vegetation clearance within a wetland – Teal Bay

Charges were laid in the Whangarei District Court on 7 December 2021 against four parties for offences relating to earthworks, vegetation clearance and discharge of sediment that occurred in December 2020. A joint memorandum was signed on 28 June 2022 regarding one issue - whether the wetland is a natural wetland or a constructed wetland. This issue is relevant for some of the charges. Both parties’ experts will attend a conference to seek resolution and the report on outcome of the conference is to be filed by 16 December 2022. The next court appearance is 24 January 2023.

·    Farm dairy effluent - Hikurangi

Charges were laid in Whangarei District Court against four defendants for the illegal discharge of farm wastewater that occurred in November 2021. On 18 October 2022, NRC and the defendants appeared before Judge. A joint memorandum filed prior to the appearance consenting to adjournment to allow time for the defendants to review the disclosure. The next court appearance is 24 January 2023.

·    Discharge of contaminated water to stormwater - Whangārei

Charges were laid in Whangarei District Court against one defendant for offences relating to the discharge of contaminated water to a stormwater network that occurred in September 2021. On 18 October 2022, NRC and the defendant’s lawyer appeared before Judge. A joint memorandum filed prior to the appearance consenting to adjournment to allow time for the defendant’s lawyer to review information. The next court appearance is 24 January 2023.

 

8.2.5   ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

 

SUBMISSIONS LODGED UNDER DELEGATED AUTHORITY

Submissions lodged under delegated authority during the month of September 2022.

Policy and Planning

National direction for plantation and exotic carbon afforestation (Submissions closed 18 Nov 2022)

 

land management

Environment fund progress

72 environment fund grants were approved late September across the following funding streams:

·   Water quality and wetlands – 61 projects funding $485,621

·   Soil conservation retirement fencing – 7 projects funding $46,184

·   Regional Afforestation Grant (RAGS) – 1 project funding $3,000

·   Terrestrial biodiversity – 3 projects funding $17,365

 

The Land Team is currently drafting application processes and funding criteria for the community and thangata whenua fund in order to be prepared to implement this fund over the 23-24 financial year.

 

Whangārei urban awa project

There has been continued interest from the last mail out with many site visits with landowners undertaken.  Of these, 17 sites have had a fencer visit for quoting and more are lined up.  The first of the Year 3 fencing contracts have gone out.  The last two planting projects for the planting season are complete and signed off.

 

The year 2 annual report has been finalised with the Ministry for the Environment approving some underspend to be carried over to the Year 3.  This funding will be allocated to additional fencing in year 3.

 

Waimā Waitai Waiora Partnership

The team has completed the target of planting 70,000 plants for the 2022 planting season and the majority of fencing has now been completed. The partnership is working towards the project close out by December 2022 in addition to looking at how they can move forward together continuing to build on the relationships that have been established through a Mana Enhancing Agreement. 

 

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Figure 1 WWW partnership holding governance hui at the Hapū Hub

 

Team development

Three staff from the Land Management Team were fortunate enough to attend this years NZ Association for Resource Management Conference.  The conference provided staff with the opportunity to hear from Minister Parker and senior government officials as well as make connections with other council staff and rural professionals from around the country working in the catchment management space.  Of particular interest were insights into the Fresh Water Farm Plan Pilot programme, MPI’s On-Farm support services, and the review of the National Policy Statement for Plantation Forestry. 

 

biodiversity

FIF Dune Lakes Project

Objective

Status

Aquatic weed control

Lake vegetation surveys were completed at Lakes Tutaki, Egg and Mt Camel North. Only one strand of hornwort was found in Lakes Tutaki and Egg.  Some hornwort was found in Mt Camel North.  If possible, this lake will be treated again before Christmas, along with the southern pond at Lake Tutaki.  Lake Karaka on the Poutō Peninsula will be treated in February 2023.  Lakes Tutaki and Egg will be surveyed again in January 2023 and if more hornwort is found, they will be treated again in February.  

Education Days

The final two education days of the FIF Dune Lake project were held in September. 40 students attended an event at Lake Taharoa, where Te Roroa shared some amazing kōrero about the lake, its history, and the relationship Te Roroa has with the area. A further 87 students attended an event at Ruakākā Dune Lake, with Patuharakeke sharing with us the original name for the lake, Rotopārera.  Students learned about fish, tuna, plants and water quality.  These two events saw NRC partner with Te Roroa, Patuharakeke, Bream Bay Coast Care Trust and DOC.

Around 1000 students have now attended one of 17 dune lake events since 2019.

Māori Partnerships

A date for Ngā Roto Tapokapoka tūhono wānanga has been set with Ngāi Takoto who will host the wānanga at Waimanoni Marae between 8-10 February 2023.

Pest fishing

Tench fishing at Lake Kapoai took place in October and 201 fish were removed.

Grass carp

An automatic fish feeder has been built to improve fishing results this summer.

 

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Topics of discussion at the tuna station included reproduction, various life stages, and the two main species of tuna in New Zealand

 

CoastCare

Several CoastCare planting days were held in September and early October, closing the planting season for the year.  

 

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A working bee was held with Marsden village local residents, Bream Bay Coastal Care and Department of Conservation. Almost 30 volunteers turned up on a sunny Sunday morning to plant 1000 spinifex and pīngao and put up a fence and signs to direct people away from the planted area. The plants and materials were provided by NRC CoastCare. 

 

The project was started by a group of local residents concerned about the dune damage from vehicles and foot traffic and the resulting dune blow-outs and movement of sand inland.  Residents are keen to continue this work along the dunes in the area.

 

Tamariki and whanau from Ahipara School plant and weed each year on the dunes near Korou Kore Marae in Ahipara, near the school.  After a year off due to Covid they were raring to go and planted 1000 spinifex in a couple of hours.  Te Rūnanga o Te Rarawa provided much appreciated kai afterwards

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A planting day was held at Mitimiti with Mātihetihe Marae and Te Kura o Mātihetihe.  The marae and kura take their name from the tihetihe (spinifex) whose seed heads blow around the dunes in the summer.  Tamariki were very enthusiastic about planting 1,000 more tihetihe in a bare area which had previously been accessed by vehicles. This area was fenced through the NRC Environment fund two years ago to enable the dune to rebuild and provide protect the marae immediately behind it.

A working bee and family fun day was held at Matapōuri with Te Whanau o Rangiwhakaahu Hapū and Department of Conservation, as part of the ongoing work to restore the dunes in the area.  Weed species were removed and replaced with 500 spinifex plants.  A fence was constructed to protect the plants.

 

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Working bees were held at Taipa to finish clearing weeds from the dune area, following the final spray work for the season by contractors.  The areas that were cleared were planted out with spinifex and pīngao.

Pīngao plants were also planted on the dunes at Tokerau Beach.

 

As summer approaches, the focus of CoastCare groups has now moved to protecting the dunes and the wildlife that live and breed in the dunes and beaches from the influx of summer visitors.  Groups all around Te Taitokerau are protecting shorebird breeding areas with signage and fencing and are also participating in a data collection programme to collate all this information into one place.

 

CoastCare Education

Biodiversity staff members travelled to Te Tairawhiti and Te Mahia to assist the Duffy Foundation in their quest to inspire the next generation to seek education and take on kaitiaki roles in the community.  Over six days, more than 1,000 tamariki were spoken to from 14 low decile schools including whanau, hapū and iwi from Ngāti Porou and Ngāti Kahungungu.

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Wetlands

Further Wetland Condition Index (WCI) monitoring visits have been carried out or are planned for the coming spring season to complete the fourth round of monitoring.  Biodiversity staff have provided advice and attended hui for riparian and wetland restoration at Waimamaku with Reconnecting Northland and hapū.

 

Terrestrial

·   Technical advice has been provided to Planning for Regional Plan reviews for vehicle exclusion zones and significant bird areas critical habitat. 

·   The vegetation component for the Parihaka BioBlitz has begun, including two survey days with hapū collective Ngā Kaitiaki o Ngā Wai Māori. The collective includes representatives from Ngāti Kahu of Torongare and Te Parawhau (mana whenua of Parihaka), Ngāti Hau, Ngāti Hine and Te Uriroroi.  Much knowledge was exchanged, and it was an excellent opportunity build relationship while working together. 

·   The Tāika Forest Biodiversity Assessment Report is complete and awaiting review. 

·   A planning workshop for the upcoming Ngai Takoto Predator Free 2050 nohonga was supported at Waimanoni marae, with the nohonga planned for March 2023.

·   Planning is also underway to deliver several biodiversity assessments for landowners. 

·   Two weekend (after hours) Botanical Rambles were held locally in Pukenui and Parihaka for interested staff and others.

 

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Parihaka Orchid Ramble.  Left to right:  Bulbophyllum pygmaeum (aka Pygmy tree orchid), Microtis arenaria (aka onion orchid), Thelymitry longifolia (aka white sun orchid, māikuku) & Corybas oblongus (aka spider orchid).

 

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Pukenui weekend Botanical Ramble.  Left to Right: Biosecurity staff member and her tamāhine, Rubus cissoides (tataramoa), Earina mucronata orchid (peka-a-waka).

  

Natural resources

Water Quality Operations

·   Continuous dissolved oxygen loggers were deployed in monitored lakes as part of the implementation of the monitoring network review.  This data will greatly increase our understanding of the ecosystem metabolism of the lakes and meet the National Policy Statement for Freshwater (NPS-FW) requirements.

·   Three new staff members joined the team.  Two were funded through the Long-Term Plan to deliver on National Policy Statement for Freshwater (NPS-FW) requirements and the recent review of council’s State of the Environment monitoring programmes. 

·   The third role is externally funded through the Ministry for the Environment’s Jobs for Nature.  It’s core focus is engaging with iwi and hapū to support their kaitiaki aspirations around water, develop environmental monitoring capacity and communicate and facilitate engagement with council’s monitoring programmes.  We are currently working with Ngāti Kuri (engagement with NRC programmes and monitoring capability), Ngāti Rēhia (saltwater wedge surveys, engagement with NRC programmes) and Te Rarawa (supporting their freshwater monitoring programme).

·   Staff organised and/or attended a number of training sessions designed to ensure our data collection remains consistent and highest quality.  This included a field visit with Auckland Council officers for consistency across our regions. Monitoring officers and freshwater scientists from both regional councils covered the technicalities of water quality, periphyton and deposited fine sediment.  A team periphyton session and a saltwater wedge survey session with compliance monitoring were also undertaken.     

·   Preparations for the official launch of council’s recreation bathing models on Safeswim on 1 December 2022 are progressing on schedule.  The Communications Plan involves alignment of messaging with the other Safeswim partners and will include media and social media messaging to ensure the public are fully aware of our new predictive modelling approach. 

 

Air quality

·   An expert report on the potential adverse effects of open burning of tyres was prepared, in support of council’s prosecution against an individual for the open burning of tyres and burying the remains. Open burning of tyres contravenes a National Environmental Standard for air quality and a regional rule of the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland. Burning tyres in open releases significant quantities of toxic air pollutants (carcinogenic and mutagenic) into air and produces large quantities of toxic oil, which can contaminate soil, surface, and ground water.

 

Coastal

·   A project designed to estimate how much litter is reaching Te Tai Tokerau coastal environment through stormwater drains, has estimated that over six million items are released from the Whangārei stormwater network every year - the vast majority being plastics.  A further 1.3 million items were estimated to be released from the Kerikeri stormwater network and 1 million from the Dargaville stormwater network each year.  The project was part of a multi-agency response led by NRC and involved the region’s three district councils, Northland District Health Board and local businesses.  It involved installing and auditing the contents of 51 litter traps that were fitted in stormwater grates throughout the region at a variety of places, such as schools, playgrounds and car parks. These litter traps captured a staggering 21,000 items of litter, with plastic accounting for 71.1% of all items. Litter and plastic are one of the biggest pollutants of our oceans.

 

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NRC and students from Taipā Area School undertook an audit of a litter trap that was installed in the school’s grounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Te

 

Hiku Water Study

The aerial electromagnetic (AEM) surveying of the Aupōuri aquifer commenced on 12 October 2022 and will be completed by mid to late November 2022. This aerial survey is part of the Te Hiku Water Study that aims to improve our understanding of the aquifer structure (e.g. depth, extent, shell beds), how the aquifer is connected to wetlands, lakes and streams and the boundary between groundwater and seawater (risk areas for salt-water intrusion).  The $3.3 million study is largely funded through Aqua Intel Aotearoa, a collaboration between Kānoa (the delivery arm of the Provincial Growth Fund) and GNS Science. Co-funding organisations include Northland Regional Council, Far North District Council, Ngai Takoto and Te Aupōuri.

 

The work is overseen by the Te Hiku Water Study Project Team, which includes representatives of Ngai Takoto, Ngāti Kuri, Te Aupōuri and Te Rarawa iwi, landowners and ratepayers, as well as Far North District and Northland Regional Council. The Department of Conservation is also collaborating with the study.

 

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SkyTEM Helicopter taking off

 

 

Freshwater ecology

Scoping work to determine the distribution and abundance of nationally threatened freshwater insects in Mt Taika Forest has been completed.

 

Freshwater quality

The contract for procuring a GIS-based high-resolution digital river network (DRN) model for Northland (based on regional LiDAR data) is underway. The draft GIS deliverables for the Northern Wairoa catchment have been shared with the Kaipara Moana Restoration (KMR) project team. The draft GIS deliverables for the rest of the region is being internally reviewed with the final report due by February 2023.

 

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Figure 1. An example snapshot of DRN catchments (dark grey lines) with river lines at 2ha (dark blue), and 0.2 ha (light blue) scales in Tangiterōria. Dark brown dots indicate start and end points of each river segment. The yellow jagged lines are currently available coarser catchments (i.e., NIWA river network model).

 

AgResearch has been contracted to undertake an up-to-date analysis of E. coli monitoring data to identify the key sources and underlying factors/drivers of microbial contamination in Northland Rivers and potential mitigation interventions appropriate. This work will provide valuable information to support NRC’s Freshwater Plan change. The final report is expected to be delivered by March 2023.

 

Natural Resources Data

Data Automation Project

The research and development phase of the data automation project is now complete. The output from this phase was a software scripts which detect and repair irregular stage (water level) data. For example:

·   Spike detection and removal

·   Flatline detection and removal

·   Gap detection and repair

·   Smoothing Ramping of data

·   Quality coding to NEMS

 

Hydrology

Rainfall

 

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·   Most of Northland received less than the expected rainfall total for September 2022, with a regional average of 85%, and more than the expected rainfall total for October, with a regional average of 138%.

·   In a reversal to September 2022, October 2022 saw drier areas to the west and north while eastern and southern areas received the most.

·   Kai Iwi Lakes only recorded 39% of the October 2022 median while Waipao at Draffin Road, west of Whangārei, recorded 297%. Several sites around Whangārei exceeded 200%, including Waitangi at Wiroa Road.


 

Rivers

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River flows for September 2022

 

·   River flows show a similar pattern to rainfall, with most of the Far North and Eastern catchments recording above normal or normal flow for September 2022. 

·   Central, western and southern catchments generally recorded below normal flows, with a few exceptions (such as the Hakaru at Topuni river station in the South recording above normal flow for September 2022). 

·   October 2022 flows were not available at the time of reporting.

 

Groundwater

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Groundwater Levels for September

 

 

·   Groundwater levels in our primary monitored aquifers were normal to above normal throughout Northland, except Ruawai which was lower than normal for
September 2022. 

·   October 2022 groundwater levels were not available at the time of reporting.

 

Seasonal climate Outlook

A summary of NIWA’s Seasonal Climate Outlook for October to December 2022 for Northland:

·   Temperatures are very likely to be above average (70% chance)

·   Rainfall totals are about equally likely to be near normal (40% chance) or above normal (35% chance)

·   Soil moisture levels and river flows are most likely to be near normal (45% chance)

 

 

 

 

The full probability breakdown:

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POLICY AND PLANNING

Freshwater Plan Change

The Policy and Planning Team is continuing to develop draft text for the freshwater plan change in conjunction with internal staff workshop in early December and then to Council / TTMAC workshops in 2023.

 

The Primary Sector Liaison Group has provided council staff with their final report (October) which provides advice to council on freshwater management issues pertinent to the primary sector.

 

The Tangata Whenua Water Advisory Group (TWWAG) has been working with consultants on their recommendations on the freshwater plan change from a thangata whenua perspective (Stage 2 Recommendations Report).  The report was presented to the Te Taitokerau Māori and Council to the iwi and hapu7 members of the TTMAC Working Party in October and the further presentation is to be held in November to confirm endorsement of the report. TWWAG has also begun their work on case studies (Wairua River, Aupōuri Aquifer, Poroti Springs, Hikurangi Repo, Whitikī ngā Punawai ō Hokianga, and the six Te Mana o te Wai projects funded by MfE in Te Taitokerau), with the findings due in December.

 

The next phase of communications began early November, with a focus on awareness raising, directing people to NRC’s website (which has updated information about freshwater), and asking people to share their views on freshwater and what improvements they think should be made.

 

National Policy Statement – Highly Productive Land

The government has released the NPS – HPL to address concerns over the loss of productive land throughout the country.  The NPS was released on the 19 September 2022 and comes into effect from 17 October 2022.  The key matter for regional councils is the requirement to map land within the region that is within the general rural or rural production zone, has a land use capability class of 1-3 and is not already identified for future residential development (regional councils can include other areas considered to be highly productive).  The mapping is required to be undertaken in consultation with district councils and thangata whenua.  NRC has 3 years to prepare the maps and notify changes to the Regional Policy Statement to incorporate them. Consent authorities are to apply the NPS-HPL to Class 1-3 land zoned rural production / general rural in the interim.  Once the maps are finalised, the district councils will need to adopt them and prepare supporting objectives, policies and rules.

 

Pricing agricultural emissions

In October 2022 the government released a consultation document on pricing agricultural emissions. The proposals are based on a version of the farm level, split-gas levy pricing released by He Waka Eke Noa in May 2022, but proposes modifications largely on the basis of advice from the Climate Change Commission. Proceeds from the levy are to be used for system administration, a dedicated Māori fund and for research and development with oversight by an advisory group made up of Māori and sector representatives.  The government is aiming to introduce agricultural emissions pricing from 2025 – in the event the farm level approach is not achievable by this date, an interim processor-level levy is proposed. Submission close 18 November and staff have not submitted on the proposal.

 

Proposed Regional Plan Appeals

Staff continue to work to resolve the remaining appeals on the Proposed Regional Plan for Northland. Key points arising since the last report include:

·   Topic 1 Coastal activities - Appeal parties reached agreement, resolving appeals on a number of objectives, policies and rules for managing activities in the coastal marine area (CMA). The court has accepted the proposal and issued a consent order in September. This consent order resolves approximately half the appealed provision controlling activities within the CMA. The remaining coastal appeal points are largely tied up with appeals on Outstanding Natural Landscapes and management of Significant Bird Areas / Significant Ecological Areas.  

·   Topic 1 Significant Ecological Areas / Significant Bird Areas – These appeals are centred around how the Proposed Regional Plan manages activities in mapped areas with high ecological value. Council recently circulated a revised proposal to the parties, which was well received.  Staff will continue discussions with the one appellant that does not support the proposal, with a view to resolve this matter out of court.

·   Topic 17 Outstanding Natural Landscapes – Discussions with the appeal parties are ongoing.

 

8.2.6   BIOSECURITY

 

INCURSIONS

Spring and summer are traditionally the busy period for new pests and biosecurity responses with higher volumes of people out and about, increased movement of goods and the growth lifecycles of pests and diseases. As such, the Incursions team is gearing up to ensure that we have the systems and processes in place to ensure we can respond promptly should anything occur.

 

The team met with Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) response groups and other industry partners in mid-October to foster working relationships and share response data. 

 

Special Projects 

Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) Planning Update. 

Biosecurity staff have been liaising closely with MPI as they undertake the review of the FMD ’All of Government Response Plan' to ensure that Northland Regional Council (NRC) is up to date with any developments. Consultation on a policy document is expected in the coming months. Staff met with MPI on 20 October with FMD as one of the agenda items.   

 

Wallabies

Two separate reports of wallabies were received in October. The first located in a small gravel pit in Waipoua forest, and the second at Pukenui forest. A ground search was undertaken at both locations with scat samples collected for further analysis from Waipoua. Trail cameras have been set in Waipoua to monitor the site for several weeks. A detector dog is currently being organised for additional surveillance. Signage will be set up at Pukenui forest to encourage the reporting of any additional sightings and at this stage there have been no further reports.

A staff member is attending the National Wallaby Eradication Programme annual conference this week.

 

 

 

 

 

WILD ANIMAL CONTROL

Feral Deer

A two-day wānanga based on Te Ao Māori approaches to pest animal management was held at Te Rāwhiti Marae Russell on the 6-7 October. The wānanga was well received and attended by the local hapū and kaitiaki rangers. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The delivery of the wānanga was part of the contract with NRC and Trap and Trigger with a brilliant narrator (who did the tutoring) and preceded the Russell sika faeces DNA survey work which was completed after 10 days hard graft in difficult weather conditions.  Results of the DNA analysis is expected to be confirmed in the new year.

 

Seven of the students from the wānanga joined the Trap and Trigger Crew for the survey work and all of them indicated they would like to be doing more of the mahi.  

 

Feral Deer Response

On 26 October 16 deer escaped from the Kamo Wildlife Sanctuary.  Eleven animals were destroyed by the local farmers and sanctuary staff and the remaining five deer are being traced.  

 

On 27 October a lone deer was reported in Waipū and verified via video footage. Work is underway working in partnership with the farmers in the area to establish the home range of this animal to eliminate it. 

 

KAURI PROTECTION

Kauri Museum 60th Anniversary Festiva - 15 October 2022.

The first time multi agencies have joined forces to attend an event for Kauri Protection.  Northland Regional Council was supported by members of the Auckland Council, engaging with public and answering questions.

 

 

 

 

PARTNERSHIPS

Northland Regional Council – Kiwi Coast partnership 

Kiwi Coast had a busy September and October including hosting the Northland Kiwi hui in collaboration with Save the Kiwi Trust and a new group was established, ‘Pests Off Puhipuhi’.

 

Over 120 keen kiwi savers gathered to share knowledge, research results, and discuss ideas and strategies at the Northland Kiwi Hui, October 2022.


Other key mahi included a refresh of the Northland Brown Kiwi Drought Response and Action Plan to better prepare for expected droughts and the negative impacts of these on kiwi, planning for the year ahead by the Whangārei mustelid control network, and the development of new technology with early plans in place to hold a workshop with Steve Allan for his new SA4 Ferret Trap in November, and progress continuing with Ocean Sense to develop AI software for analysing Kiwi listening device data. 

 

High Value Area (HVA) and Community Pest Control Area (CPCA) Highlights: 

Kiwi chicks have been hatching all over Northland with Whangārei Heads and Tutukaka HVAs recording their first kiwi chicks for the season and the first known kiwi chick hatched within the Kiwi Link HVA (within the Owhiwa Landcare area) in September: 

  

First KiwiLink HVA kiwi chick - Sept 2022  

 

  

CC the latest kiwi chick from Tutukākā HVA  

 

Staff and communities also conducted a significant number of toxin operations across many of the HVA and CPCA projects this month, including within the Tutukākā HVA, Piroa-Brynderwyn HVA and a range of CPCAs in Western Northland. These operations have been timed to be most effective at targeting possums and rats but also protecting hatching kiwi and other vulnerable native birds.  Staff also supported a DOC-led Waipoua Forest aerial 1080 operation in October by providing funding towards ground control for possums on the private land adjoining the forest.

 

The new Piroa Conservation Trust was successfully registered in October and the new trustees are setting their sights on the strategic direction of their organisation in collaboration with key stakeholders. Work has also started on a presence/absence survey for kiwi using acoustic devices across the Piroa-Brynderwyn HVA. Early results indicate kiwi are present as far east as Bream Tail farm to just west of Marunui Conservation Area, however this monitoring project is in its early stages and there is still a lot of area left to cover. 

 

The Whangarei Heads Weed Action Native Habitat Restoration Trust (WANHRT) completed the first phase of their Whaka Ora Reotahi project. This project has been a flagship landscape scale operation for WANHRT. Through successful funding bids the group secured $50,000 lotteries grant and $15,000 of Whangarei District Council funding. This funding has enabled pest plant control to be undertaken across the majority of the 65 hectares of Reotahi, one of Whangārei Heads iconic maunga. Large swathes of wild ginger, jasmine, queen of the night, moth plant, banana passionfruit, cotoneaster and elaeagnus have been controlled, releasing native plants and seedling. This work was undertaking by the Aki Tai Here contract team, equating to 1400 hours of control work on the maunga. WANHRT is completing further funding applications to secure follow up control work on the maunga.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fields of wild ginger being cleared on Reotahi.                          One of the Aki Tai Here team releasing natives from a wall of jasmine

 

In the far north, new relationships are being created in pest management in Te Hiku, focusing on pest eradication on the Aupōuri Peninsula. Biosecurity staff are also assisting Ngāi Takoto and Te Rūnanga Nui o Te Aupōuri to implement pest management in their rohe.  

 

Tiakina Whangārei – Urban Pest Control 

September and October were dominated with planning for the Parihaka BioBlitz which will be held in November, as well as conducting doing predator surveys in Parihaka with the support of NorthTec students. Tiakina Whangārei project staff also held a stall at the Whangārei Growers’ Market to promote urban pest control.  

 
Tiakina Whangārei project staff promote urban pest control at the Whangārei Growers’ Market – Sept 2022.
 

 

 

PREDATOR FREE

Predator Free Whangārei  

PF2050 and mana whenua representatives of the Whangārei and Pēwhairangi Whānui project areas attended a wānanga in Whakatane, hosted by Korehāhā Whakahau, an iwi led Predator Free project.  

 

Before the Whangārei Heads project moves into the Kauri Mountain and Manaia landscapes, we will be reviewing our formal engagement process with Whangārei hapū and community. This is with the objective of forming a steering group with the appropriate people from the community and mana whenua who will be more closely aligned with the project priorities and outcomes.

 

We will be seeking guidance from the NRC Māori Engagement team as well as project Tikanga field advisor. This requires careful consideration so tikanga can be respected whilst project delivery momentum is maintained. While this is being worked through, the field team will shift focus to other tasks that won’t compromise our position with mana whenua. 

 

The operational part of the project is entering an exciting phase as the team moves from knockdown to mop up in initial working blocks. This represents a huge effort by the field team who have battled pampas, gorse & bad weather to maintain weekly servicing of eradication infrastructure. Currently a detection network of 28 live capture traps and 69 cameras are active in mop up areas. Possum detections from cameras has dramatically reduced, showing that our knockdown has been successful. 

 

Predator Free Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) 

The first collective hui between all project partners from each peninsula was held successfully at The Landing. This was a meaningful way for each group to meet all key project partners involved in the development and implementation of the PF2050 Pēwhairangi Whānui kaupapa.  It was also a good opportunity to meet kanohi ki te kanohi with PF2050 Ltd 

 

 

Pēwhairangi Whānui group hui held at ’The Landing’ 

 

 

 

 

MARINE BIOSECURITY

Hull surveillance

Between 08 August 2022 and 02 November 2022, the Hull Surveillance Programme surveyed 95 vessels.  There were 12 incidents of Sabella spallanzanii (Mediterranean fanworm) and one incident of Styela clava (clubbed tunicate) found on vessel hulls. All of these incidents were detected in harbours where these species are already known to have established populations, staff work with these vessel owners to ensure that these species are not spread further.

 

Table 1:  Hull Surveillance Programme Results to 03 November 2022

Hull Surveillance Programme Results

Total this period

Total
YTD

Number of vessels surveyed this period    

95 

181 

% Pathways Plan Compliance if Moving (all vessels) *  

50.9 

57.2

Vessels found with Marine Pests    

 

 

Sabella spallanzanii (fanworm)    

12

13

Styela clava (clubbed tunicate)    

1

1

Undaria pinnatifida (Japanese kelp)    

0

0

Eudistoma elongatum (Australian droplet tunicate)   

0

4

Pyura doppelgangera (sea squirt)    

0

0

* This is the percentage of vessels surveyed that complied with the acceptable level of ‘light fouling’ as defined in the Marine Pathway Plan. Note: actual compliance is higher given not all these vessels will move from one designated place to another.

 

NRC/MPI Investigation – Goby Trapping Matapōuri Estuary 

NRC have been assisting MPI with investigations to determine if there has been a possible range extension of a non-indigenous fish species, the Australian flatback mangrove goby (Mugilogobius platynotus) in Matapōuri. The flatback mangrove goby is a small fish that was recently identified by experts from Te Papa Museum for the first time in New Zealand in Ngunguru this April. As part of these investigations, NRC has been connecting with hapū and local communities in Matapōuri to involve them in the process and gather local knowledge. 

 

NRC staff and kaitiaki have conducted several trapping exercises with no non-indigenous fish being detected. 

 

 

Hapū, MPI, NRC and Te Pūkenga representatives work together to identify fish captured in Matapōuri estuary 

 

National Workshops and Conferences  

A representative from the marine biosecurity team attended two workshop this month, the first being the New Zealand Marina Operators Association (NZMOA) annual conference and the second being a workshop to begin an operational research project the Cawthron Institute are conducting on behalf of MPI to develop treatments for marine pest eradication. At the NZMOA conference, staff from NRC and BOPRC presented to marina and haul out operators (~150 individuals) to introduce the Marine Vessel Portal (MVP) the Top of the North collaboration are developing. The MVP is a centralised vessel database that maps and records vessel movements between regional boundaries. This resource will be used by industry and Regional Councils to manage biosecurity risks and will enable operators to protect their structures.  

 

The workshop at the Cawthron Institute initiated a 4-year project that aims to identify and test operationally scalable treatment protocols for use in marine pest response situations. The researchers have agreed and are excited to trial new techniques in Ōpua such as encapsulating technologies that will compliment NRC on-going practical eradication efforts. 

 

 

Marine biosecurity managers from NRC and Bay of Plenty Regional Council present at the NZMOA annual conference  

  

Marine Biosecurity in the Pacific Workshops, French Polynesia 

One of the NRC’s marine biosecurity team went to French Polynesia to participate in a two-day workshop on marine biosecurity research and management for French Polynesia and the wider South Pacific. Representatives from New Zealand, Australia, Fiji, Spain, and French Polynesia were in attendance representing a range of industry, government agencies and scientific/research institutes. This workshop provided the opportunity to showcase the legacy and leanings of NRC’s marine biosecurity programme and also the challenges that Northland and New Zealand face in this sector with potential application to the wider Pacific. Time was dedicated to creating a plan as to better prepare French Polynesia to have marine biosecurity systems in place. Additionally, to the workshops, the delegation from New Zealand (including NRC staff) were invited to visit the port authority offices in Papeete and tour the facilities of the CRIOBE research centre in Moorea. 

Attendees from the workshop held in Papeete with the President of French Polynesia.   
PEST PLANTS

A second discovery of seedlings the eradication species bat-wing passionflower (Passiflora apetala) was found at Whangārei Heads by a resident and local volunteer. This area is outside of the known infestation area in Whangārei and the source of the seedlings remains unknown. Further sponsored Facebook posts, media coverage and mail drops are underway to try and raise the profile of this discovery in the hopes of encouraging further reports. Additional survey and door-to-door canvasing is also planned. 

 

Six other new eradication species sites were also confirmed; a large new mile-a-minute sighting in Paihia, a second site of spartina in the Mangawhai Harbour, and four Micky Mouse plant sites.

 

The only known Senegal Tea site in the region was inspected and a small area of re-growth treated.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The smothering growth form of mile-a-minute on display at the new site in Paihia Mile-a-minute

 

A weed workshop was run, in partnership with the Department of Conservation, for local iwi members and some rangitahi from Taipa Area School. A total of 17 participants attended and enjoyed a pot-luck lunch before some hands on practical in an area of dune revegetation at Ramp Rd, Lake Ohia.  

   

Workshop participants working on identification  

   

                                                                                        Taipa Area School students engaged in    

                                                                                              boneseed control on dunes at Ramp Rd. 

 

8.2.7   GOVERNANCE AND ENGAGEMENT

 

MĀORI ENGAGEMENT

Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2022

This year we celebrated that for many of our staff, every week is Māori language week.  Throughout Te wiki o te reo Māori, staff were invited to nominate from amongst their peers those were leaders and advocates for Te Reo Māori.  We received 15 nominations in total with some being recognised by as many as three of their peers.  Of course, there was the Governance and Engagement PA, who runs our weekly Speed Te Reo class, some very dedicated staff who attend every week, some who have taken it upon themselves to enrol in te reo Māori classes in their own time and those who show leadership by encouraging and supporting their teams.   Here are just a few of our champions of te reo Māori.

 

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Pōwhiri for the new council

A Pōwhiri was held on Tuesday 18 October at Te Puna o Te Tauranga Marae, NorthTec - Te Pūkenga, to welcome our newly elected councillors and their whānau to ensure that the council induction commenced with the appropriate tikanga in recognition of our commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. It was a significant occasion as many from near and afar attended to recognise and acknowledge the newly elected members, particularly the Te Raki.

 

Councillors

being called onto

Te Puna o Te

Tauranga

Marae.

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incoming

councillors

listening to

whaikōrero;

 

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The Māori Relationships Team, alongside other staff have also supported powhiri across the region for the new elected councillors for the Far North and Whangarei District Councils.

 

Far North District Council councillors and community board members

 

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Some of the newly elected Whangarei District councillors supported by two of the Te Tai o Tokerau Far North District councillors

 

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Tū i te ora Scholarships

Applications for Northland Regional Council’s Tū i te ora Scholarships have opened for 2022, with this year’s recipients set to receive paid work experience and financial assistance for the first time since the scholarships launched.   Council is awarding six scholarships, each including $4000 to assist with study costs, plus a paid full-time work experience with NRC from mid-November 2023 to mid-February 2024.

 

This is the fourth year council is awarding the scholarships, which recognise, encourage and support students to undertake study that relates to council’s environmental and regulatory functions, whilst contributing to council’s vision ‘Our Northland – together we thrive’.

 

The scholarships have a specific aim to build Māori capacity within Te Taitokerau, with three of the six scholarships earmarked for Māori who whakapapa to Te Taitokerau.  

 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Investment and Growth Reserve – Projects Report

Project

Update

Future developments/ reporting

Extension 350

Both final evaluation report and project completion report and were provided.

None. Project completed.

Grown Northland

Funding allocated to support this made at the JREDC meeting of 23 September.  Letter from CEO outlining reporting requirements and payment schedule sent to Northland Inc.  First of three tranche payments made.

Reporting for work completed in period ending 31 December due end of January. 

 

Other Work Undertaken

Ÿ Joint Regional Economic Development Committee (JREDC) – Held the final meeting of the current JREDC and quarterly workshop with Northland Inc on 23 September.

Ÿ Northland Economic Quarterly – September issue prepared, distributed and available online at https://www.nrc.govt.nz/media/twefeu13/economic-quarterly-issue-35-september-2022.pdf  The annual section reports on the tourism sector data for the year ended June 2022 while the spotlight section examines some of the recent statistics for Northland. The NEQ is available through council’s eNewsletter service, sign-up at: www.nrc.govt.nz/enewsletters

Ÿ Te Ōhanga Rautaki Whānui o Te Tai Tokerau (Regional Economic Development Strategy) – Attended the third meeting of the Steering Group and provided support in the workshop conversation. Organised the Local Government work stream meetings for the regional economic development strategy work that took place in September and October.

Ÿ Northland Walking & Cycling Strategy Forum – Organised meeting to discuss actions, updates and other issues in relation to the implementation of the strategy.

Ÿ Regional Projects Reserve – on-going discussions with Te Taitokerau Water Trust and Marsden Maritime Holdings regarding the status of projects that funding from the RPR has been allocated to.  The funding agreement in relation to the investment into the Kaipara Water Scheme is being developed in November. 

Ÿ Freshwater Management Plan – Working closely with the policy & planning team to estimate the costings of various mitigation options for improved water quality in Northland.

Ÿ Flood protection – provided economic benefit data to support the assessment of the Awanui and Whangatane spillway upgrade.

 

ONLINE CHANNELS

Most popular content on Facebook:   A post regarding Manaia Kindergarten becoming Enviroschool silver.  (25 October 2022). Reaching 4,785, with engagement 986.

*Engaged – number of people who ‘reacted’, commented, or shared the post

Key Performance Indicators

Jun-22

Jul-22

Aug-22

Sep-22

Oct-22

WEB

 

 

 

 

 

# Visits to the NRC website

26,946

50,527

57,337

24,318

41,197

E-payments made

14

77

50

25

17

# subscription customers (cumulative)

1,365

1,364

1,359

1,353

1,352

SOCIAL MEDIA (cumulative)

 

 

 

 

 

# Twitter followers

1,590

1,591

1,593

1,595

1,601

# NRC Facebook followers

10,682

10,817

10,884

11,045

11,101

# NRC Overall Facebook Reach

102,991

117,053

75,741

43,071

134,778

# NRC Engaged Daily Users

5,011

8,692

5,195

2,800

5,098

# CDEM Facebook fans

26,305

26,717

27,049

27,186

27,231

# CDEM Overall Facebook Reach

6,569

203,071

120,694

64,756

36,666

# CDEM Engaged Daily Users

147

25,258

12,890

5,482

2,318

# Instagram followers

1,547

1,557

1,559

1,568

1,575

 

ENVIROSCHOOLS / EDUCATION

Wai Fencing – Far North course held

The Enviroschools Wai Restoration project engages young people and local communities in the restoration of waterways and biodiversity. The Wai Fencing project stream develops skills and provides NCEA qualifications for building fences to exclude stock from waterways and other areas of biodiversity significance.  On 2 Sept (skills day) and 28 Sept (assessment day), senior students from Kaitaia College, Northland College, Ōkaihau College, Taipa Area School and Te Rangi Aniwaniwa took part in the Far North course at Rangiputa Station.  The assessment day culminated in fencing off a farm waterway that will be planted in native riparian species.  Council’s Education team was supported by the Land Management team, Can Train NZ and local industry.

 

Dune lakes education days – Kai Iwi and Ruakākā

On 8 and 15 September, ‘Getting to know your dune lakes days’ were held at Lakes Taharoa and Ruakākā.  Council’s Biodiversity and Education teams joined local hapu in delivering ‘action stations’ focused on water quality, pest and native fish, tuna and dune lakes.  Participating schools included:  Bream Bay College and One Tree Point, Tinopai, Tangiterōria and Aranga Schools.

 

Discovering how healthy the water is at Lake Taharoa


One Tree Point School at Ruakākā dune lake.

 

Project Pest Control – Whangārei assessment day held

Project Pest Control (PPC) develops skills and provides NCEA qualifications in controlling possums, mustelids, rodents and feral cats.  The course involves theory and in-field training, and career opportunities are investigated.  On 29 Sept, the Whangārei PPC assessment day was held at Kiwi North.  Participating schools include Bay of Islands College, Kamo High School, Mangakāhia Area School, Renew School, Ruawai College, Tauraroa Area School, Whangārei Boys’ High School, and Whangārei Girls’ High School.  Councils Education and Biosecurity teams ran the event, supported by Can Train NZ and local industry.

 

Pete Graham assesses a raised leg-hold trap set.

 

 

Manaia Kindergarten celebrates Enviroschools Silver

As schools and centres grow in their sustainability learning and actions, they move through the Enviroschools stages of Bronze, Silver and Green Gold.  On 18 October, Manaia Kindergarten (Parua Bay) celebrated becoming a Silver Enviroschool.  From trapping rats and pumping rainwater, to felting kākahu and coastal hikoi; Manaia Kindergarten is developing new projects and involving more people in its Enviroschools journey.


Congratulations Manaia Kindergarten!

Enviroschools communities facilitated

During September and October, despite the school holidays, Enviroschools Facilitators held 115 specific interactions with school and early childhood communities.

 

 

 

COMMUNICATONS

Media Liaison

In total, 23 media releases were created and distributed to media throughout Northland during the period covered. Topics included:

·    New NRC chair elected

·    Election results

·    Tū i te ora scholarship

·    Cultivation setback warning

·    Litta Traps

·    Dune Lakes

·    Orchids flowering season underway.

 

Combined, this activity helped generate 165 items mentioning Northland Regional Council as reported by media monitoring agency Fuseworks.

Top five sources of Northland coverage were:

1.    Northern Advocate (50)

2.    Northland Age (9)

3.    Kaipara Lifestyler (9)

4.    Bay Chronicle, Northern News, Whangarei leader (7)

5.    Whakaata Māori TV (6)

 

Freshwater Plan Change

The communications element of the Freshwater Plan Change continues to demand significant resourcing and is a key priority for the team. During the period, work to prepare for the launch of phase 2 (November) of the wider Freshwater Communication and Engagement Plan took place.

Phase 2 is a feedback campaign aimed at testing what we have already been told is important about Freshwater in Northland. It communicates the following:

·    provides information on what Northland’s current baseline states are for freshwater

·    communicates known public views on how they use freshwater

·    seeks feedback on values people hold for freshwater (via web tool).

 

To support this the following activity took place:

·    writing and design of 16-page brochure explaining freshwater plan and Te Mana o te Wai (to support thangata whenua engagement)

·    design and all logistics to enable an online freshwater hui for thangata whenua (14 November)

·    writing and design of one-page ad communicating key messages of phase 2

·    writing and design of social media campaign – phase 2.

 

 

 

 

MARKETING AND ENGAGEMENT

Car Free Day Campaign

Car Free Day is a global event, celebrated in cities around the world and in 2022 was held on 21 September.  A full marketing campaign was held around the event from 1- 21 September, including social media, a media release, posters, flyers, radio advertising and an ad on the digital billboard, in addition to internal communications with NRC staff via Express and the Wellbeing group.  The campaign culminated with a public event held in the Vine Street car park on 21 September 2022 that included demonstrations of e-bikes and e-scooters, a coffee cart and opportunities for the public to interact with staff from Transport, Community Engagement and Climate Change.

The following measures were achieved:

·    Bus travel in Whangārei increased by up to 25% on the day

·    Over 200 people attended the public event

·    c.78,000 people in Northland were reached via print media 

·    1,515 people engaged with CityLink Facebook content, which was displayed 4,998 times  

·    5% increase in CityLink Facebook page followers during the campaign period

 

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1.              Figure 2 NRC & NTA staff and contributors at Car Free Day 2022

 

Total Mobility Far North

This campaign is currently running, to promote Total Mobility in the Far North. Total Mobility offers subsidised travel with specialist transport providers to people who are unable to drive due to disability. Platforms used are a leaflet drop to householders, rest and retirement homes and doctors’ surgeries in the Far North, targeted advertising in Far North publications both online and offline and social media.

 

CityLink Facebook campaign

This campaign is currently running, to increase engagement with the CityLink Facebook page, providing CityLink service users with a rapidly updated, easily accessible resource for bus updates and information. Platforms used are the CtiyLink Facebook page, social media ads, posters in bus shelters and on buses and radio coverage.

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL INFORMATION (LGOIMA) REQUESTS

Total LGOIMAs

September 2020 to October 2021 (2 months reporting)

September 2021 to October 2022

(2 months reporting)

11 for September.

13 for October.

16 for September.

10 for October.

Number of LGOIMAs not responded to within 20 working days

1

 

REQ.613365 was late due to the ambiguous nature of the request, and because the same request was sent to Whangarei District Council, requiring some disentangling to determine who was responsible for which parts of the request.

CUSTOMER SERVICES

Telephone inbound call statistics and enquiries

   

August

September

October

Call volume via Customer Services 

2073

1733

1663

Average wait time 

10secs

8.8secs

9 secs

Calls answered in under 30 seconds 

2030

1707

1639

 

Telephone call volume over the last three years

 

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Call volume via Customer Services 

20812

30566

23669

 

Mailroom email processing performance

 

August

September

October

Mail processed

909

739

694

 

Satisfaction monitoring

Feedback cards, compliments, and complaints

Compliments received   September

Total

Consents – Consents Administrator

City Link

Customer service

1

1

2

Total compliments recorded

4

 

Compliments received   October

Total

Water Quality – Environmental Monitoring Office, Water Resources

Customer service

1

3

Total compliments recorded

4

 

Complaints received   September

Total

Ÿ City Link

Ÿ Car free day

Ÿ Total Mobility

Ÿ Kiwi Cab

5

1

2

1

Total complaints recorded

9

 

These complaints are all resolved or referred.

 

Complaints received   October  

Total

Ÿ Destruction of Shellfish beds along Te Oneroa-a Tōhē

1

Total complaints recorded

1

 

This complaint is open.

 

8.2.8   COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

TRANSPORT

Regional Land Transport Plan 2021/2027 

Section 13(1)(a) of the Land Transport Management Act 2003 states that “Every 6 financial years, each regional council must ensure that the relevant regional transport committee prepares, on the regional council's behalf, a regional land transport plan”. 

Section 18CA(1) of the Land Transport Management Act 2003 stipulates that “A regional transport committee must complete a review of the regional land transport plan during the 6-month period immediately before the expiry of the third year of the plan”.

 

Prior to the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021/2027 – Three Year Review, the Regional Transport Committee will be required to decide and agree if changes to land transport related government policy, legislation and funding justify a review of the existing Regional Land Transport Plan 2021/2027 or if a full rewrite be required.

 

A review would take approximately six months to complete. A full rewrite with consultation would take approximately 18-24 months to undertake.

 

Regional Road Safety Action Plan

The Regional Road Safety Action Plan (RSAP) is an evidence-based document aligning with relevant Government Policy Statements, National Safety Strategies (Road to Zero Strategy), Regional Land Transport Plans, district road safety plans and includes data from the Community Risk Register, hospital statistics, etc.

 

The above assists in determining the prioritisation of road safety focus areas in the region. Specific actions will be defined and implemented along with agreed indicators to track the results.

The RSAP will be updated annually with the issues, actions and indicators being modified as needed to maximize benefits.  

 

Bus Services

*BusLink figures are reported one month in arrears, due to the required information being unavailable at the time of the agenda deadline

Bus Link stats for August 2022  

(revenue excl GST)

Actual   

Budget   

Variance

Year / Date Actual   

Year / Date Budgeted 

Variance 

CityLink Passengers   

35,982 

30,085 

5,897 

60,689 

55,825 

4,864 

CityLink Revenue   

$44,041 

$38,810 

$5,231 

$75,738 

$72,014 

$3,724 

Mid North Link Passengers   

162 

180 

-18 

371 

340 

31 

Mid North Link Revenue   

$576 

$798 

-$222 

$1,386 

$1,508 

-$122 

Hokianga Link Passengers    

70 

54 

16 

123 

102 

21 

Hokianga Link Revenue   

$399 

$376 

$23 

$700 

$710 

-$10 

Far North Link Passengers    

400 

325 

75 

686 

610 

76 

Far North Link Revenue   

$937 

$910 

$27 

$1,677 

$1,708 

-$31 

Bream Bay Link Passengers   

30 

24 

107 

56 

51 

Bream Bay Link Revenue   

$215 

$173 

$42 

$760 

$403 

$357 

Hikurangi Link Passengers   

18 

24 

- 6 

35 

48 

-13 

Hikurangi Link Revenue   

$47 

$63 

- $16 

86 

126 

- $40 

 

Bus Link stats for September 22   

(revenue excl GST)     

Actual   

Budget   

Variance

Year / Date Actual   

Year / Date Budgeted 

Variance 

CityLink Passengers    

 34,871

28,886

 5,985

95,560

84,711

10,849

CityLink Revenue    

$41,736 

 $37,263

 $4,473

 117,473

$109,277

$8,196

Mid North Link Passengers    

205

180

 25

576

520

56

Mid North Link Revenue    

 $600

$798

 -$198

 $1986

 $2306

-$320

Hokianga Link Passengers     

82

54

28

205

156

49

Hokianga Link Revenue    

$392

$376

$16

$1,092

 $1,085

$7

Far North Link Passengers     

406

305

 101

1,092

915

177

Far North Link Revenue    

$977

 $854

$123

$2,655

 $2,562

$ 93

Bream Bay Link Passengers    

 51

30

21

 158

86

 72

Bream Bay Link Revenue    

 $229

$216

 $13

 $989

$620

$369

Hikurangi Link Passengers    

 21

24

-3

 56

72

 -16

Hikurangi Link Revenue    

$29

$78

-$49

 $115

$203

-$88

Ÿ Farebox figures include actual fares taken, the government 50% fare top up subsidy allocation and the SuperGold funding allocated to each service.

Ÿ The 50% fare subsidy is in place until 31 January when it will be replaced with Community Connect subsidy for Community Card holders.

Ÿ Passenger numbers include Adult / Child /SuperGold (where applicable)

 

Passengers Carried

The number of passengers carried on all services in September 2022 showed an increase.

 

For the Mid North Service, whilst passengers increased, the farebox revenue was below budget due to the increased number of SuperGold Card passengers carried at reduced fares.

 

Antisocial Behaviour

Unfortunately, incidents of antisocial behaviour continue at both the Rose Street Bus Terminus and on the Whangārei CityLink buses.

 

The plan to provide separate buses for school children direct from the residential areas to the relevant school in the mornings and return in the afternoons remains on hold due to the continuing driver shortage.

 

National Bus Driver Shortage

This issue continues to effect services nationwide and, while our services in the Mid and Far North can continue to operate all trips, the Whangārei CityLink have had a number of days where 2 or 3 trips have been dropped due to illness (covid) and driver shortages. Notices continue to be placed on the CityLink website, Facebook and TrackaBus advising the public of these disruptions.

 

Total Mobility (TM)

*Total Mobility Scheme figures are reported one month in arrears, due to the required information being unavailable at the time of the agenda deadline.

 

Total Clients

Monthly Actual Expend

Monthly Budgeted Expend

Monthly Variance

Year / Date Actual Expend

Year / Date Budgeted Expend

Annual Variance

Whangārei

August 2022

1277

$34,623

$28,750

$5,873

$71,231

$57,500

$13,731

September 2022

1277

$32,621

$28,750

$3,871

$97,922

$86,250

$11,672

Far North

August 2022

95

$587

$13,750

-$13,163

$587

$27,500

-$26,913

September 2022

100

$1,500

$13,750

12,250

$2,087

$41,250

$39,163

 

Client travel for the Far North Total Mobility Scheme is low due to this being a recently introduced initiative which will need time to grow.

 

Promotion and advertising of the Scheme continues.

 

 

 

Road Safety Update

Fatalities Jan – Oct 2021

Far North

Whangārei

Kaipara

Northland

National

Local roads

4

2

2

8

146

State highways

6

3

7

16

121

TOTAL

10

5

9

24

267

 

Fatalities Jan – Oct 2022

Far North

Whangārei

Kaipara

Northland

National

Local roads

2

7

0

9

163

State highways

11

4

2

17

145

TOTAL

13

11

2

26

308

 

Motorcycle Safety - Ride Forever (R4E) Rider Training Update

2022/2023 year end was another COVID affected year

Ÿ R4E – 2019/2020 – 240 riders completed courses for that financial year.

Ÿ R4E – 2020/2021 – 186 riders completed courses for that financial year.

Ÿ R4E – 2021/2022 – 182 riders have completed courses for this financial year just completed.

Ÿ R4E – 2022/2023 - Financial YTD – 50

Ÿ Bronze Course        21

Ÿ Silver Course           16

Ÿ Gold Course 13

 

ACC Ride Forever (R4E) Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month (MAM)

 

Northland events included -

Ÿ On Saturday 24 September North Coast Honda held a “Biker Safety Expo” as part of the events during Motorcycle Awareness Month.  As part of the Expo riders could:

Ÿ Chat to Ride Forever course trainers who were registering riders to courses

Ÿ View a range of motorcycles – including a 1918 Triumph, a 1924 Harley Davidson, a Harris and Honda racing bike plus a Britten V1000 racing bike

Ÿ Have a mechanic do a visual bike check

Ÿ Go in the draw for an Alpine Star air vest valued at $1,400.00

Ÿ Obtain discounts on other riding clothing

Ÿ Through-out September, and extended through the month of October, riders were able to receive a $150.00 trade-in when purchasing a new helmet.

Ÿ It is estimated that up to 300 people visited North Coast Honda for the Expo. 

Ÿ Thirty riders signed up to a Ride Forever course.  The trainers also mentioned there were a number of riders also signing up for their Basic Handling Skills or Competency Based Training Assessment course.

Ÿ Nine riders took up the opportunity to have their bike mechanically checked

Ÿ The Vintage Motorcycle Club operated a BBQ and raised $370.00 in donations for the Rescue Helicopter

Air-vest giveaway sign-up

Some of the riders

Helmet trade-in

 

Britten V1000

Harris and Honda racing bikes

 

This event was made possible by the Team at North Coast Honda, Northland Road Safety Trust, Mediaworks, Northland Regional Council, Ride Forever providers – ProRider and AA, Vintage Motorcycle Club and ACC for supporting this event.

 

Waka Kotahi & NZ Police Road Safety Promotion/Media

Themes for September / October were - Drugs, Speed, Motorcycling & Safe Vehicles, Distractions.

 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Following the flooding response of 17-18 August, a multi agency debrief was held on 22 September to capture outcomes and opportunities.  These findings will be reported to the next Northland CDEM Coordinating Executive Group (CEG) meeting to be held on 29 November 2022.

 

This month staff attended the Lifelines Utilities Forum in Queenstown, a Māori in Emergency Management Wānanga, Te Kotahitanga o ngā Tai (co-hosted by mana whenua, Ngāti Toa, Te Āti Awa and NEMA) and the NZ Emergency Communications Conference in Wellington 17-19 October.

The wānanga provided an opportunity to strengthen relationships and partnerships and identify how we can continue to build our combined emergency management capability.  There is still a lot of work to do in this space and staff are continuing to look for, and capitalise on, opportunities to ensure we are working in true partnership with iwi and hapū.

 

The previous CDEM Group and Coordinating Executive Group meetings were held on 6 September 2022.

 

 

 

MARITIME

This month, the Kioreroa Reach beacon replacement project was completed well ahead of the scheduled completion date of 31 March 2023, and within budget.  These beacons have been in situ for many decades and all ten have now been removed and replaced by more suitable plastic buoys which reduce damage to vessels in event of collision.  When these aged beacons were damaged, they were expensive to remove by contractors who were not always available or in the region.  The new buoys will be maintained by the Maritime department during their regular maintenance programme and any incidents will be able to be rectified promptly.  

 

With the return of cruise ships to the Bay of Islands, the Harbourmaster’s team has resumed pilotage services.  With New Zealand’s borders closed due to COVID for the past two seasons, cruise ships had been unable to visit.  The industry has returned strongly with two ships successfully piloted into the Bay during October.  Fifty-four ships are booked this summer and 89 are scheduled for the next 2023/24 season.

 

RIVERS

Work Streams   

Status   

Comments   

Awanui Flood Scheme Upgrade  

Year 3 of 3 year accelerated programme

Rock-stabilization Dunn Street section.  We expect earthworks – Northern Benching to begin as soon as ground conditions are favourable   

Otīria/Moerewa Flood Mitigation Spillway and Bridge

Year 3 of 3 year accelerated programme

Phase 2 Construction scheduled to start 9 January after Māori Land Court appeals period. 

Phase 3 Contract awarded.  Mobilization early November

 

CLIMATE ACTION OVERVIEW

An overview of the climate action and natural hazards team activities is attached. This was presented to incoming councillors at their induction on 2 November 2022.

 

 

 

Mitigation

Certification of our carbon inventory is nearing completion with Toitū. This is a critical first step in enabling us to baseline our emissions and plot a path forward to reduce our own footprint, show leadership and enact effective emissions reduction action.

 

Adaptation

Ÿ The Water Resilience Fund ($500k p.a.) is nearly fully allocated for the next two financial years.